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February 09, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-02-09

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iC i 9 a Yt ailm

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

mIchigandailycorn

(RE)MODELING THE MOTOR CITY

UNIVERSITY FACULTY
Records
outline 'U'
sanctions
for prof.

'. r
ANNA SCHULTE/Daily
Members of a School of Art & Design studio class taught by Assistant Prof. Beth Diamond make project proposals and present models for installations that will
be added to the Heidelberg Project in Detroit in April. Rackham student Nick Lavelle (left) presents his group's project titled "Full Circle."
UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
New drug could reduce death
rates of bone marrow disease

Amid scandal,
Yaron Eliav forced
to step down from
committee posts
By CAITLIN HUSTON
Daily News Editor
Yaron Eliav, an associate pro-
fessor of rabbinic literature at the
University, has finished his court-
ordered probation after pleading
no contest to the charge of using
a computer to commit a crime
in 2008. However, e-mail con-
versations and court documents
obtained by The Michigan Daily
show the University initially
imposed restrictions on his pro-
fessorship after the incident.
Eliav was involved in an inci-
dent in April 2008 when he
responded to advertised sexual
acts on Craigslist that were post-
ed by a 22-year-old University
Law school student. Eliav paid
the student $300 for sexual acts.
During the incident, the student
allowed him to slap her buttocks
but became concerned when he
slapped her twice on the face. The
student pursued Eliav in court
after their encounter.
Eliav received a deferred sen-

tence on Dec. 30, 2008 after
pleading no contest to the charge
of using a computer to commit a
crime.
The student involved also
received a deferred sentence after
pleading no contest to the charge
of using a computer to commit a
crime.
Steve Hiller, deputy chief pros-
ecuting attorney for Washtenaw
County who was not involved
in the lawsuit, said the case was
dismissed in November 2009.
He added that Eliav and the Law
student successfully completed
their probationary periods and
"no longer have a public record of
conviction."
Eliav wrote in an e-mail inter-
view this week that he and the
Law student currently have no
legal repercussions as a result of
the situation.
"I wish to emphasize that the
incident concluded without any
legal consequences, for me or the
woman involved; the only charge
that was eventually brought to
court against us - illegal use of a
computer - was dismissed with-
out conviction and without any
criminal record," Eliav wrote.
"In other words, I was not found
guilty of any wrongdoing."
Eliav returned to teach on
See SANCTIONS, Page 3A

In mice, drug
prototype prevents
graft-versus-host
disease
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
University researchers have
developed a prototype drug that
may positively impact the future
of bone marrow transplants and

the treatment of autoimmune
diseases.
The collaborative research of
Gary Glick, the Werner E. Bach-
mann Collegiate Professor of
Chemistry at the University, and
James Ferrara, director of the
Blood and Marrow Transplant
Program at the University's
Comprehensive Cancer Center,
focuses on the metabolism of
cells and aims to stop the devel-
opment of graft-versus-host dis-
ease known as GVHD.
GVHD can be a major com-

plication during bone marrow
transplant procedures, Ferrara
said. According to a Jan. 26 Uni-
versity press release, the new
findings could potentially create
new ways to fight immune dis-
eases.
Glick and Ferrara, among oth-
ers, recently co-wrote a study on
the effectiveness of the proto-
type drug Bz-423 in stoppingthe
onset of GVHD, accordingto the
press release. The findings of the
study, which was performed on
mice, was published in Science

Translational Medicine maga-
zine on Jan.26.
Ferrara explained that the
research on Bz-423 initially
began with Glick's "long-stand-
ing interest in the bioenergetics
or the metabolism of cells."
According to Ferrara, Glick
first discovered Bz-423 through
the screening process of com-
pounds and also found it could
"get activated cells to die in a test
tube," preventing the contrac-
tion of GVHD in the test animals.
See DISEASE, Page 3A

PANEL DISCUSSION
Public health experts talk
potential of nanotechnology
Professors discuss School of Public Health, Mark Seventy people also watched

pros and cons of
nano use
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily StaffReporter
Three University experts
gathered yesterday to discuss
the risks and benefits of nano-
technology use in a panel titled
"Nanotechnology-Unplugged."
Martin Philbert, dean of the

Banaszak-Holl, a professor of
chemistry and macromolecu-
lar science and engineering
at the University and Shobita
Parthasarathy, an assistant
professor of public policy at
the University, spoke before
an audience of about 20 faculty
members and students at the
School of Public Health's Risk
Science Center about the con-
troversial use of nanotechnolo-
gies in the fields of science and
public policy.

a live stream of the event online
at the Risk Science Center's
website.
Andrew Maynard, director
of the University's Risk Sci-
ence Center and the moderator
of the panel, began the discus-
sion by asking Banaszak-Holl
to explain what nanotechnol-
ogy is.
A nano is about three to five
times bigger than an atom,
Banaszak-Holl explained. He
See PUBLIC HEALTH, Page 3A

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
MSA passes resolutions to improve
campus resources, budget reports

ANNA SCHULTE/Daily
Janice Inwood, a registered nurse at the University Health Service, and LSA freshman Hailey Steinhauser, a UHS work-
study student, demonstrate the process of getting a flu shot at UHS yesterday.
Less students seek fliu
vaccinations this year
After H1Nt hype, scant notice from the University flu season compared to last year
community. has contributed to a decrease in
virus garners little Robert Ernst, medical director demand for the vaccine.
of University Health Service, said "There is a lot more vaccine
attention low demand for the flu vaccine available this year than there
this year was troubling since the was last year ..." Ernst said. "This
By SARAH ALSADEN vaccines available in Ann Arbor year, there's been less demand
Daily StaffReporter could have protected the stu- but widely available vaccines, so
dents, staff and faculty who have there are people sitting on sur-
After the deluge of attention come into UHS with the flu. pluses of vaccines."
on the H1N1 virus last year, this According to Ernst, the lack The emergence of the HINt
year's flu season has received of media attention on this year's See FLU, Page 3A

Six total resolutions
pass, two involve
MSA budget
By ROBIN VEECK
Daily StaffReporter
The Michigan Student
Assembly addressed internal
and campus problems at its

meeting last night.
The MSA approved six reso-
lutions at the meeting, which
took place in MSA chambers.
Three of the resolutions amend-
ed MSA's governing documents,
and the other three proposed
potential improvements to cam-
pus life.
The assembly passed a reso-
lution amending MSA's Com-
piled Code that is intended

"to address the lack of clar-
ity" regarding MSA's process
of addressing student organi-
zations' potential violations of
student rights, according to the
resolution. Twenty represen-
tatives voted for it, two voted
against it and nine abstained.
The resolution was written
by MSA Student General Coun-
sel Timothy Bekkers, Engineer-
See MSA, Page 3A

WEATHER HI: 15
TOMORROW Lo.5

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INDEX AP NEWS..
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dettTheMichiganDaily OPINION...
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..2A ARTS.. . ..A........A
..3A SPORTS ......................7A
.4A THE STATEMENT..........1B

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