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February 03, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-02-03

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0 Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, February 3, 2011

SNOWMAN SUPPORT

michigandaily.com
OFFICE HOURS
'experts:
Outcome in
Egyptis still
questionable
Vice Provost says by the Mubarak regime. Howev-
er, he added, the anti government
conflict could spur protesters also could have initi-

HANNAH CHIN/Daily
Rackham student Dan Marcin, treasurer of the Graduate Employee Organization, creates a snowman on the Diag yesterday to picket on behalf of graduate stu-
dent instructors. GEO is a union of GSIs who aim to bring attention to negotiations they are having with the University for a new three-year contract.
CITY EMPLOYMENT
Google seeks hire more
emat A2 branch

more violence in
Middle East
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
DailyNewsEditor
Protests in Egypt continued for
a ninth day yesterday as support-
ers of President Hosni Mubarak
attacked demonstrators who con-
tinue to denounce the regime.
Yesterday's conflict came after
Mubarak announced he would
not immediately resign. Instead,
he said he will not run in the
country's upcoming September
elections.
University experts say the ulti-
mate outcome of the conflict is
ambiguous at this point and that
the protests in Cairo could prove
to have greater effects by possibly
sparking riots in other countries
in the region.
Mark Tessler, the University's
vice provost of international
affairs, said in an interview last
night that the gangs attackingthe
protesters were likely being paid

ated the violence.
"The general take of people
who seem to know what they're
talking about is that this has been
adeliberate strategy on thepartof
the government to sow violence,
to try and discredit the protest-
ers, totry and make people think
that there'll be chaos if Mubarak
isn't in power," Tessler said.
He added that he doesn't think
the violence would deter protest-
ers from insisting that Mubarak
resigns. Ultimately, he said, the
uprising's success depends on
whether the Egyptian Army
decides to align with the govern-
ment or with the protesters.
"Right now the 'army has
apparently just been standing
back," Tessler said. "They could
go in and suppress the violence,
they could go in and increase the
violence and try to suppress the
protesters. They haven't done
either of those things so far. They
haven't protected the protesters.
They claim they have a right to
demonstrate and express their
views, lout so far they've just been
See EGYPT, Page 5A

Company to
increase workforce
25 percent this year
By K.C. WASSMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Though the country has faced
an ailing economy and a high
national unemployment rate
over the past few years, techno-

logical industries have managed
to weather the economic chal-
lenges, and have even displayed
rapid growth. Amongthese com-
panies is one with a branchTight
in Ann Arbor - Google.
Google announced last week
that 2011 will be one of the larg-
est hiring years for the corpora-
tion, as it begun a national search
for potential employees to match
the growth of its business. And
the upcoming hiring includes

more openings at the company's
Ann Arbor and Birmingham,
Mich. offices.
Google's Midwest Manager
Jake 'arrillo wrote in an e-mail
interview that the company has
had a successful financial period
and is looking forward to wel-
coming new members to its team
in the upcoming year.
"We have just announced a
stellar quarter, and we are pre-
paring for another year of great

success," Parrillo wrote.
According to the Associated
Press, Google intends to hire
more than 6,200 workers in 2011
- an employee increase of more
than 25 percent from 2010.
Google's Ann Arbor office,
located on South Division Street,
is a branch of the company's
AdWords advertising program
that generates most of Google's
revenue. Parrillo wrote that
See GOOGLE, Page 5A

ANN ARBOR PUBLIC TRANSIT
'U' and city officials divided
on Fuller Road station plan

Proposal would add
977 parking spaces
close to campus
By BRIENNE PRUSAK
Daily StaffReporter
Ann Arbor's plans to com-
mence the Fuller Road transit
station may be put on hold due
to a debate surrounding the
project's first phase to develop a
* STUDENT GOVERNMENT

parking structure.
While some city and Universi-
ty officials support the creation
of the parking structure, Ann
Arbor City Council members are
skeptical of the structure's con-
struction and intent.
The plans for the parking
structure will be officially pre-
sented to the Ann Arbor City
Council on March 21. On that
date, the council will vote on
whether or not to complete the
construction of the proposed

977-space parking structure,
according to Eli Cooper, Ann
Arbor transportation program
manager.
The proposed transit station
is part of the city's goal to offer
alternative transportation and
to give riders more options, Coo-
per said. The project is part of
the city's Model for Mobility -
an initiative proposed in 2006
that includes the creation of an
Ann Arbor-Detroit corridor,
See FULLER ROAD, Page 6A

MARissA MCCLAIN/Daily
Yikes, who was hit by a car a few months ago, relaxes on a sofa in the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity house last night.
Lambda Chi brothers fundraising to
pay for injured house dog's surgery

MSA and LSA- SG campaigns take
student suggestions to improve 'U'

Representatives
look to expand 'This
Sucks' and 'What to
Fix' initiatives
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
In an attempt to remedy stu-
dent problems ranging from
erratic wireless Internet con-

nections to poor lighting around
campus, the Michigan Student
Assembly and LSA Student Gov-
ernment have launched cam-
paigns in the last several years
to ensure student requests to
improve campus life are ade-
quately addressed by the Uni-
versity administration. Student
government representatives say
their "What to Fix" and "This
Sucks" campaigns have been suc-
cessful in getting students' con-
cerns heard.

MSA's Campus Improvement
Commission launched its What
to Fix campaign abouteightyears
ago, which created an avenue for
students to make University offi-
cials aware of existing issues in
facilities on campus. Campaign
initiatives include Saturday night
dining in residence halls and
extending the hours the Hatcher
Graduate Library to be open on
Friday evenings.
LSA sophomore Sean Walser,
See CAMPAIGNS, Page 5A

Brothers offer to
fix cars, serenade
students
By BRIENNE PRUSAK
Daily StaffReporter
Fraternities are founded in
brotherhood, with men helping
one another. So when a member
of the Lambda Chi Alpha frater-
nity house was injured recently,
the brothers stepped up to lend a
hand. This brother, however, is a
little hairier than the others and

has four legs.
The fraternity member is
named Yikes - the Lambda Chi
house dog. Several months ago,
Yikes was hit by a car, which
broke and dislocated his right
elbow.
Over the past couple weeks,
the brothers of the Lambda Chi
fraternity at the University have
been raising money to pay for
surgery for Yikes, who is about
eight years old. The brothers
have raised more than $250 so
far, but in order pay for Yikes's
$1,855 surgery, they've recruited
the efforts of those outside the

fraternity as well.
Engineering junior Gabe
Johnson, former president of
Lambda Chi and current house
manager, said Yikes is currently
walking with his three function-
al legs. In order to fully heal his
injured leg, he needs to have the
surgery.
To track their fundraising
efforts, the brothers created a
Facebook event titled "Help Fix
Yikes's Leg," which details a list
of services the brothers can pro-
vide in exchange for small fees,
Johnson said.
See YIKES, Page SA

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