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November 30, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-30

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RUNNING WITH IT 0 C
James Fran
Sophomore quarterback Denard
ks tnny Boyl
Robinson was named the Big Ten's adsturbin
Offensive Player of the Year. ))PAGE 7 rue story.
Tuesday, November 30, 2010

of
ly
5

Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.com

UNIVESITYADMIISTRAIO
May says U'
ftndraisingto
help students
afford tuition

At SACUA meeting,
Hanlon also talks
'self-help' financial
aid programs
By CAITLIN HUSTON
Daily StaffReporter
Jerry May, the University's vice
president for development, spoke
about how his office is working to
raise money to help students deal
with the burden of rising tuition
at a meeting of the leading faculty
governing body yesterday.
Addressing a question from
Gina Poe, vice-chair of the Senate
Advisory Committee on Univer-
sity Affairs, May said that though
his office has not been pressured
to pay any of the University's
operating costs, development offi-
cials have been working with the
administration to prevent addi-
tional increases in tuition.
"We've been cognizant of the
need to try to figure out how to
reduce the pressure on raising
tuition," May said.
May added that his office is
trying to do this through raising
more money for need-based schol-
arships. May also said that with
every tuition increase, develop-

ment officials raise more scholar-
ship money to offset the financial
burden for some students.
Speaking about donor contri-
butions to scholarships, May said
donors often want to support stu-
dents hailing from their hometown
or country, which often leads to
some students being overlooked in
the scholarship process.
Associate Prof. of Architecture
Mojtaba Navvab, who is also a
SACUA member, expressed con-
cern that international students
aren't receiving as much scholar-
ship money as native students and
therefore do not have the same
opportunities in the workplace.
May said there is a gap of at least
$11,000 in aid between native stu-
dents and international students.
However, May also noted in his
talk that his office recently created
a scholarship fund to help support
students studying abroad and to
fund international students admit-
ted to the University.
Ed Rothman, SACUA chair and
professor of statistics, also raised
a question about how to garner
more money from faculty for an
undergraduate scholarship offered
to one student that is supported
almost entirely through faculty
contributions.
May said that though faculty
See SACUA, Page 3

Columbia University Prof. Jeffrey Sachs discusses climate change and sustainable development at Rackham Auditorium yesterday.
UN advi sor to A2 crowd:Politics
slowing ciaecag rrs

In talk at Rackham,
Jeffrey Sachs says
media, lawmakers
ignoring issue
By SABIRA KHAN
Daily StaffReporter
When Professor Jeffrey Sachs
of Columbia University's Earth
Institute introduced himself to a
crowd of about one thousand Uni-
versity community members in
a dimmed Rackham Auditorium

last night, he immediately let the
audience know where his loyal-
ties lie.
"I'm a Michigander through
and through," he said.
Sachs, who is the special advi-
sor to United Nations Secretary
General Ban Ki-Moon and the
president and co-founder of the
Millennium Promise Alliance. He
addressed the issue of global cli-
mate change during his talk yes-
terday, and called the debate over
global warming "unintelligible
and unimaginable" to the scien-
tists who study the topic.
He was invited to the Univer-

sity by the Gerald R. Ford School
of Public Policy in collaboration
with the International Policy
Center to give the 2010 Citigroup
Foundation Lecture. The Citi-
group Foundation established the
lecture series in 2000 as part of an
endowment to the Ford School.
Susan Collins, dean of the
Ford School, told the crowd that
Sachs's ability "to infuse theo-
retical insight with practical
engagement" made him an ideal
candidate to deliver the lecture.
Sachs began his speech by dis-
cussing the lack of coverage that
sustainability and conferences

dealing with climate change
issues receive in the media.
"How puzzling it is that as
important as this issue is, the
only time really its got notice in
the United States in the recent
months is to defeat (policymak-
ers) who voted for doing some-
thing about it," he said.
Sachs went on to explain that
while elected officials can under-
mine environmental issues when
it benefits them, the damage to
the planet is real and ongoing.
"The climate does not really
care about our politics, it's not
See SACHS, Page 3

COSBY HONORS

FINANCING YOUR EDUCATION
Experts: No relief in sight for
climbing rate of student debt

Level of debt for
students is worst its
been in 15 years
By HALEY GLATTHORN
Daily StaffReporter
Student debt is at its worstlevel
in nearly 15 years and financial
experts agree that in the future,
students won't be in a better posi-

tion to payoff loans and cover col-
lege costs than those facing them
currently.
The $23,000 that the average
college graduate owes in loans
is a product of state legislatures
cutting higher education fund-
ing and universities increasing
tuition, according to Christine
Lindstrom, director of the Higher
Education Project for the Public
Interest Research Group. And
Lindstrom says students' aver-

age debt is actually higher than
reported.
"There's more debt out there
because more and more students
are relying on private student
loans, but that data isn't collected
in any way so we don't know,"
Lindstrom said. "I wish I could
say it's the current economic situ-
ation, but this is a problem that
we've been seeing over the last10
to 15 years."
See DEBT, Page 3

Students play "musical chairs"during an ugly sweater'party in the Perlman Honors Commons yesterday.
Daily electsnew editor class, first
female editor in chief in a decade

MICHIGAN MEN'S SOCCER
Meram enlists Ultras to find lost jersey

New leadership plans
to promote section
collaboration in 2011
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
The Michigan Daily editorial
staff recently elected a team of 14
new editors to manage the paper
for the 2011 calendar year.

Every year, writers, editors,
photographers and designers vote
in a staff-wide election to choose
the paper's editor-in-chief and
editorial page editor. Each section
holds a similar election to choose
its managing editor. In addition,
the paper's senior editors appoint
some editorial positions, including
the managing editor, the Daily's
second in command.
After an election that lasted for
several hours, LSA junior Stepha-

nie Steinberg was elected editor in
chief last month. Steinberg - who
is currently a senior news editor -
is the Daily's first female editor-in-
chief since 2000.
"I'm honored to be in this posi-
tion," she said. "I really hope I
can set an example for all the
future women reporters who walk
through the Daily."
Steinberg said that though she
has a number of plans to improve
See EDITORS, Page 2

Jersey disappeared
while forward was
'crowd surfing'
after win over UCF
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
As time expired on the Michi-
gan soccer team's 2-1 overtime
victory over University of Central
Florida in the second round of the
NCAA Tournament on Nov. 21,
the players and the student sec-
tion converged on the sideline in
jubilant celebration.
Senior forward Justin Meram,

who scored the tying goal in the
second half of the game, took off
his shirt to celebrate the dramatic
come-from-behind victory. But
in the heat of the moment, Meram
lost his white number nine jersey
and he's calling on the Michigan
Ultras - the exuberant fan group
that's been a fixture on the side-
lines at all the men's soccer home
games this season - to help him
track it down.
LSA freshman and Ultras
Vice President Nate Hoff said
in an interview that Meram lost
his jersey while "crowd surf-
ing."
"After the game (Meram) was
waving (his jersey) around, and
then he stopped and just had it

in his hand. He ended up crowd
surfing, almost," Hoff said. "At
that point I'm pretty sure he just
had it in his hand and I guess it
got dropped or someone grabbed
it."
Meram wrote on the Ultra's
Facebook wall Monday morning
to notify the group of his missing
jersey.
"ULTRAS. PLEASE START
THE SEARCH FOR MY JERSEY
:) I KINDA NEED IT," Meram
wrote.
After Meram's Facebook post,
Hoff sent out an e-mail to the
Ultras listserv and a Facebook
message to the members of the
Ultras group requesting the jer-
See SOCCER, Page 3

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INDEX NEWS ...............
vol. CXXI, No. 57 A P NEWS ...........
@200 The Michigan Daily OPINION............
michigondoily.com

.2 A R T S ................................. 5
3 CLASSIFIEDS. ..........6
.4 SPORTS..............................7

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