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November 29, 2010 - Image 2

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2A - Monday, November 29, 2010

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

TUESDAY:
Michigan Myths

WEDNESDAY:
Professor Profiles

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JACOB SMILOVITZ KATIE JOZWIAK
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-41a-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-41ia eat. 1241
smilovitz@michigandailycom tmdbusiness@gmsailtcom

0

Razor blades mailed to prof. as threat

The Justice Department
of UCLA, an anti-animal
research extremist group, is
suspected of sending multi-
ple threats to David Jentsch,
a University of California,
Los Angeles neuroscientist
and researcher, including
a package filled with razor
blades allegedly contami-
nated with AIDS, according
to a Nov. 24 article in The
Huffington Post.
Police say that they are
investigating the group,
which criticized Jentsch
for injecting addicting
drugs into primates for his
research on tobacco addic-
tion, according tothe report.
A note sent to Jentsch
read, "How would Jentsch
like the same thing he does
to primates to be done to
him? That would be justice.
CRIME NOTES

Stop your sick experiments
or hell awaits you."
AFTER $500 FEE,
STUDENTS DROP OUT
OF HONORS PROGRAM
Enrollment in the Honors
College at the University of
Arizona dropped almost 19
percent after students were
required to pay a $500 year-
ly fee, according to a Nov.22
article in the Arizona Daily
Wildcat.
The article reported that
some students felt that grad-
uating with honors wasn't
worth the fee, while others
said it wasn't clear where
the extra money would be
spent.
"I still agree that they
are vague with where the
money is going, and I think

that's something students
deserve to know because
$250 is steep for a semes-
ter," University of Arizona
senior Ryan Kreisberg, who
dropped out of the college,
told the Wildcat.
However, some students
said in the article that the
benefits of the Honors Col-
lege, like smaller classes,
were worth the extra fee.
PROF. HAS CAMERA
IMPLANTED IN HEAD
WafaaBilal, a visual artist
and professor at New York
University's Tisch School of
the Arts, had a small digi-
tal camera implanted in the
back of his head, according
to a Nov. 23 article in The
Huffington Post.
The article reported that

Bilal decided to undergo the
procedure as an art project
for a new museum in Doha,
Qatar.
As part of Bilal's project,
called "The 3rd I," the cam-
era will capture his every-
day activities at one-minute
intervals for one year, and
the images will be transmit-
ted to the museum.
Bilal said in the article
that the project will illu-
minate "important social,
aesthetic, political, tech-
nological and artistic ques-
tions."
The article also reported
that Bilal chose to implant
the camera in the back of his
head as an "allegorical state-
ment" about the things that
people don't see.
- ALYSSA ADLER

CONTACT INFORMATION
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onineads@michigandaily.com

TONY DEJAK/AP'
Sheldon Lovejoy, 45, celebrates as he enters Bese
Buy on Friday in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. Lovejoy
came into the store early to shop,

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

No more patience
for ex-patient
WHERE: University Hospital
WHEN: Friday at about 12:30
a.m.
WHAT: A 50-year-old man
unaffiliated with the Univer-
sity was escorted out of the
University Hospital when he
refused to leave after being
discharged, University Police
reported. Police subsequently
escorted the man out without
incident.
Angell roamers
WHERE: Angell Hall
WHEN: Friday at about 5:30
p.m.
WHAT: Two men unaffiliated
with the University were dis-
covered roaming Angell Hall,
University Police reported.
One of the men was arrested
on an outstanding warrant.

Triple offender
WHERE: Campus Safety Ser-
vices
WHEN: Friday at about 1:15
p.m.
WHAT: A subject was
arrested for driving under the
influence of drugs, violating a
controlled substance and driv-
ing with a suspended license,
University Police reported.
Woman roaming
in 'U' hospital
escorted out
WHERE: University Hospital
WHEN: Yesterday at about
12:55 p.m.
WHAT: A 20-year-old woman
unaffiliated with the Universi-
ty was discovered roaming the
halls of the University Hospi-
tal, University Police reported.
She was escorted out.

Papyrus exhibit
WHAT: An exhibit fea-
turing highlights from
the University's extensive
papyrus collection. The
event will also focus on the
work of papyrologists.
WHO: University Library
WHEN: Today from
8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
WHERE: Harlan Hatcher
Graduate Library, Audubon
Room
Lecture by UN
special advisor
WHAT: Columbia Uni-
versity Prof. Jeffrey Sachs,
who also serves as a spe-
cial advisor to the United
Nations, will answer ques-
tions about his work.
WHO: International
Policy Center
WHEN: Today from
4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
WHERE: Rackham Gradu-
ate School Auditorium

Free HIV tests
for students
WHAT: An opportunity to
get anonymously tested for
HIV. The test is available
only to University students.
WHO: Spectrum Center
WHEN: Tonight from
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
WHERE: Spectrum
Center, Room 3200
CORRECTIONS
" An article in Wednes-
day's edition of The
Michigan Daily ("'U'
official says open hous-
ing unlikely to be an
option for fall") incor-
rectly stated the cost
of Saturday night din-
ing. University Housing
would have to re-allocate
$350,000 to successfully
implement the program.
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

According to a recent
study, marijuana may
increase the risk of can-
cer, dailymail.co.uk reported.
Researchers found that THC -
the chemical in marijuana that
gets people high - also com-
promises the immune system
over time.
If the Wolverines win its
upcoming bowl game,
Michigan will have fin-
ished 25-25 in the past four
years. It is also head coach Rich
Rodriguez's first bowl game.
FOR MORE, SPORTSMONDAY, INSIDE
Denver's happy hour
crowd is not so happy
about an impending
measure that will prevent tav-
erns from selling some lower-
alcohol beer, The Denver Post
reported. The restriction,
which goes into effect some-
time next year, stems from a
long debate between liquor
stores and bars.

Finance finance@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Matt Aaronson Managing Editor aaronson@michigandaily.com
Jillian Berman Managing News Editor berman@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Nicole Aber, Stephanie Steinberg, Kyle Swanson, Eshwar
Thirunavukkarasu,Devon Thorsby
SSSTAN Es EITORS: ethanBiron, Dylan CintiCaitlin Huston, Lindsay
Krae,,JoephLichtera, Veroie naldsi, lyass5Twiggs
RachelVanGilder EditorialPageEditor vangilder@michigandaily.com
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS:MichelleDeWitt,Emily Orley, LauraVeith
ASSISTANTEDITORIALPAGEEDITORS:WillButler,WillGrundler,HarshaPanduranga
Ryan Katje ManagingSports Editor kartje@miigandaily.com
S " a" "RSS E D T oS , 0rBr,,nichaelFlorek, Chanlennings, TimRohan,
Nick Spar, Joe Stapleton
ASSISTANTSPORTSEDITORS: Ben Estes,Stephen Nesbitt, Luke Pasch, Zak Pyzik,Amy
JamieBlock ManagingArtsEditor block@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Carolyn Klarecki, Andrew Lapin, JeffSanford
ASSISTA RSEDITORS:Kristyn Acho, LeahBurgin,Sharon Jacobs,KaviShekhar
Pandey, DavidTao
Max Collins and photo@michigandaily.com
Sam Wolson ManagingPhoto Editors
SENIORPHOTOEDITOR:ArielBond,MarissaMcClain
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: JakeFromm,Jed Moch
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Julianna Crim Sales Manager
SALES FORCEMANAGER:StephanieBowker
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Zach YancerWeb Project Coordinator
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at theUniversity of Michigan.One copy isaavailable free of charge toall
readers. Additionalcopies maybe pickedupat theSaiys soffiefors$2.Subscriptionsforfallterm.
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6

"

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WED. DECEMBERDE5EEFOR

FORECLOSURES
From Page 1A
month of October.
Washtenaw County Treasurer
Catherine McClary said one of the
principal reasons for foreclosures
in Ann Arbor is that there are too
many houses for the number of
people living in the city.
McClary said the demand for
student housing has motivated
developers to build more high rises
and condominiums in the city.
"(The) private sector has put up
a lot of new apartments lately," she
said.
McClary said these new devel-
opments could be detrimental
to Ann Arbor because the city is
already crowded with housing
units.
The North Quad Residential
and Academic Complex opened
this fall - and made available for
roughly 460 students. McClary
said the new residence hall didn't
impact foreclosure rates in the city
and emphasized it is the private
sector building housing for Uni-
versity students that is having an
effect.
In 2009, two high rises - Zara-
gon Place on East University Ave-
nue and 4 Eleven Lofts on East
Washington Street - opened.
Combined, the buildings made
590 spaces available for residents.
Developers are currently con-
structing Zaragon Place 2 on the
corner of East William and Thomp-
son streets, which is expected to
house 200 to 350 residents.
Before the housingbubble burst,
McClary, who has been work-
ing with foreclosures since 1999,
started noticing foreclosure trends
around 2005.
McClary said that foreclosure
rates in the eastern part of Washt-
enaw County - like in Ypsilanti -
are currently the highest, but the
number of tax delinquencies, or
unpaid taxes, in the area was sta-
bilizing. While delinquenttaxes do
not directly affect a foreclosure,

McClary said they are a leading
indicator of foreclosure trends.
Tax delinquencies in Ann
Arbor are rising faster than those
in other parts of the county. As a
result, McClary said foreclosures
in Ann Arbor will likely continue
to increase.
Nancy Bowerbank, foreclosure
and short sale manager for Charles
Reinhart Company Realtors, said
the number of foreclosures in Ann
Arbor has been historically low,
but that the city has experienced
an uptick in foreclosures over the
last few years.
However, Bowerbank said the
presence of the University and the
student housing market has helped
keep down the number of foreclo-
sures in Ann Arbor.
Though accommodating Uni-
versity students is what motivated
the private sector to build more
housing, ultimately creating a sur-
plus, McClary said Ann Arbor ben-
efits from the University because
the school significantly contrib-
utes to the city's service and entre-
preneurial sectors. McClary said
these are two key sectors that
have kept Ann Arbor from heav-
ily relying on the auto industry,
the collapse of which has left some
Michigan towns in financial ruin.
According to McClary, the city
is entering the third phase of the
foreclosure crisis in which people
are leaving their homes and pur-
suing job opportunities in other
states.
The first phase began in the mid-
2000s, with predatory lending and
subprime loans. It was during this
time that McClary's office set up a
program that allowed Ann Arbor
homeowners to modify loans.
McClary said the program took
away some of the more predatory
aspects of loans, and that the pro-
gram was adopted in some other
parts of the state.
The second phase began when
massive numbers of Ann Arbor
residents began losing their jobs,
McClary said. During this time,
home and commercial values were

hit hard, as many people lost their
homes because they couldn't pay
their mortgages.
McClary added that the prob-
lem was exacerbated when Pfizer
Inc. moved its employees and offic-
es out of Ann Arbor in 2007.
According to McClary, Pfizer
promised to give its employees up
to $100,000if they sold their homes
and moved locations to remain
with the company. McClary said
Pfizer was a large employer that
contributed to the abundance of
houses for sale in the city.
October foreclosure rates were
astronomical in some other parts
of the state. Monroe county's 48145
ZIP code, home to La Salle Town-
ship, saw a 1,425-percent increase
in foreclosures from last year -
with one in every 12 properties in
foreclosure. In Van Buren County,
one in every 24 households was in
foreclosure in the city of Breeds-
Ville.
Oakland County, one of the
nation's wealthiest counties, also
experienced rises in foreclosures
- with one in every 53 house-
holds in foreclosure in South Lyon
Township.
Cities home to universities are
not immune to foreclosures. The
area surrounding Eastern Michi-
gan University saw a 4.2-percent
increase in foreclosure filings
from September to October - a
54.3-percent jump from October
2009.
In Detroit's 48202 ZIP code,
home to Wayne State University,
there was a 19.1-percent increase
in foreclosures from October last
year, though there was no increase
in filings from Septemberto Octo-
ber of this year.
Despite the University's positive
impact on Ann Arbor, it has not
guarded the city from Michigan's
economic problems. McClary said
there is a stereotype that the Uni-
versity protects Ann Arbor on all
economic fronts.
"There's not a brick wall
between Ann Arbor and Washt-
enaw County," she said.

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