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November 11, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-11

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E HE WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
An up-close look at the hidden work PR EV IEW
that goes into bringing'U' productions Michigan women's hoops returns just one 3
to the stage. senior (Veronica Hicks, right) and will have
to count on youngsters to step up. PAGE 8A

michigandaily.com

IAnn Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, November 11, 2010

IHE ALT H CODE VIOL ATIONS, PART 2 OF 2
With in-house
inspectors, few
violations for
the Big House

SLIP, SCORE AND SUBMIT

.
£ yTh
H
y

Violations like
handling ice with
bare hands have
been corrected

By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
Each game day, in stainless steel
kitchens and concrete concession
stands, University health inspec-
tors work to protect Michigan
sports fans from potential food-
borne illnesses.
Stadiums across the country
rely on county-run inspectors to
investigate potential health code
violations, but the University has a
unique team of inspectors from the
Occupational Safety and Environ-
mental Health department. This is
a self-contained bureau within the
University that monitors health
practices at Michigan Stadium,
Crisler Arena, Yost Ice Arena and
all food venues on campus.
Before eachseasonstarts, OSEH
inspectors evaluate all permanent
stadium vendors. Each game day,
they inspect temporary food ven-
dors before the concessions begin
selling products to fans.
University spokesman Rick
Fitzgerald said temporary vendors

who fail inspections before games
aren't allowed to open their stands.
"There is a strong incentive to
do things right," he said. "Because
if they can't open on a game day,
they miss an entire day of revenue."
Inspectors also examine per-
manent stadium vendors during
games, monitoring employee prac-
tices and possible equipment mal-
functions.
According to health officials,
one of the advantages of separat-
ing University health inspections
from Washtenaw County inspec-
tions is that inspectors are able to
fix most violations immediately.
For example, when employees do
not wear hair restraints, they are
corrected on site.
Eastern Michigan University
uses county inspectors to check its
stadium, and according to Larry
Gates, director of EMU Dining
Services, the inspectors come a
few times a season.
Gates said even when dealing
with a smaller venue, he can relate
to the stress felt by the health
inspectors.
"The worry can cause you to
have a heart failure," he said.
"We've got 8,000 people, food
everywhere and 6,000 hot dogs
that need to be cooked at the exact
right temperature. It's a food ser-
See HEALTH CODE, Page 5A

SALAM RIDA/Daily
TOP LEFT: Work created by students sitting in the Residential College pottery workshop. TOP RIGHT: One of the students in the workshop throws on a wheel. BOTTOM:
LSA senior Christina Anger (left), Business senior Kelsey Brunette and LSA junior Megan Mulder participate in the Residential College Arts 289 pottery class yesterday.
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY MEMORANDUMS
Internal 'U' memo: Comped ticket
policy for AD staff contained errors

Editor's Note: This article is the memorandums written from 2006
first in a series of reports pub- to 2009.
lished by the Daily based on
management advisory memo- By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
randums obtained from the Uni- Daily StaffReporter
versity through the Freedom of
Information Act. A management A former University policy
advisory memorandum is an audit for granting complimentary
performed by the Office of Uni- football and basketball tickets
versity Audits that is not made to Athletic Department employ-
immediately public - unlike the ees included multiple errors,
other audits the office performs. according to an internal Univer-
The Daily's request, filed last fall, sity memorandum acquired by
yielded 119 management advisory The Michigan Daily through the

Freedom of Information Act.
A management advisory
memo from the Office of Uni-
versity Audits, dated July 24,
2009, informed then-Athletic
Director Bill Martin that com-
plimentary season tickets and
individual game tickets given to
Athletic Department employees
should be counted as part of the
employee's taxable income. At
the time, the Athletic Depart-
ment was counting complimen-
tary season ticket packages as

part of an employee's taxable
income, but individual game
tickets were excluded. The
memo also informed Martin of
errors on a form that employees
were required to fill out to get
the tickets.
The memo was sent to Mar-
tin as a precautionary measure
after an annual audit of the Ath-
letic Department. It was not sent
as a response to any National
Collegiate Athletic Association
See TICKETS, Page 6A

MY FIRST TIME...

CAMPUS PARTY CULTURE
Following concerns, Michigan
bans party favorite Four Loko

SAMANTHA TRAUBEN/D 4y
Art & Design senior Shifra Whiteman shares a first time experience at 'First Time!' - a storytelling event last night at Work Gal-
lery on State Street. The event was organized by MothUP Ann Arbor, a "group of people who love hearing and telling stories."
LSA STUDENT GOVERNMENT
In IT revamp, LSA student
gov. votes to endorse Google

One student says she
has stocked up 60
cans ofthe beverage
By ANT MITCHELL
Daily StaffReporter
Students looking for a "black-
out in a can" may soon have to
take their search to Ohio.
The Michigan Liquor Control
Commission banned the alcoholic
energy drink Four Loko and other
alcoholic energy drink brands
earlier this week. Manufactur-
ers now have a month to get the
drinks off the shelves. Though
Four Loko has become a popu-

lar beverage choice on campuses
nationwide, it garnered much
negative attention after nine
Central Washington University
students were hospitalized last
month after consuming the drink.
Sharon Martin, the director
of Licensing for the Michigan
Liquor Control Commission, said
concerns over the beverage stem
from two major problems - its
misleading label and the oppos-
ing effects of mixing stimulant
and barbiturate, a depressant.
"I don't think (if) a law
enforcement person or a layman
... saw someone walking down the
street with one of these products,
they would know if it was one that
contained alcohol or one that did

not," Martin said.
Martin added that she
wouldn'tbe surprised to see more
states ban the drink in the future.
The state of Washington, where
the drink first garnered media
attention for its health risks, has
already followed suit banning the
drink.
"There are other states that I
see (which) are starting to step
forward and are looking at the
same course of action that Michi-
gan has," Martin said. "In fact, a
number of universities across the
nation have specifically banned
the alcohol energy drink from
their campuses."
Mary Jo Desprez, the Universi-
See FOUR LOKO, Page SA

UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL
'U' to partner with Indian Law School

Reps. say Google is
more collaborative
than Microsoft
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
At last night's LSA Student Gov-
ernment meeting, members voted
to pass a resolution, endorsing

Google as the future of Informa-
tion Technology collaborative ser-
vices at the University.'
The resolution, which passed
with11votes in favor, none against,
and seven abstaining, will allow
LSA-SG to send a letter to the
University's IT Steering Commit-
tee, which is responsible for the
the ultimate decision in adopting
either technology vendor.
In an effort to streamline the

University's IT services, the IT
Steering Committee launched a
plan in September to overhaul the
campus communication system.
As part of the initiative, the steer-
ing committee sent a survey to the
campus community asking them
to gauge hovbest to address issues
with campus computing, like a lack
of cohesiveness in terms of e-mail
and calendaring systems.
See LSA-SG, Page 3A

Center, housed in
Delhi, to study
financial regulation
in both countries
By SABIRA KHAN
Daily StaffReporter
University Law School officials
announced the launch of a joint

institute earlier this week with an
Indian law school to study issues
surrounding financial regulation
in both countries and around the
world.
The Joint Centre for Global
Corporate and Financial Law
& Policy is being launched with
the Jindal Global Law School
in Delhi, India as part of an ini-
tiative for greater cooperation
between the two schools.
The proposal, detailed in a

memorandum of understanding,
was signed by Evan Caminker,
dean of the Michigan Law School,
and C. Raj Kumar, dean and vice
chancellor of Jindal Global Law
School.
According to a press release
issued by the University's Law
School on Monday, the memoran-
dum of understanding "provides
the framework for Michigan and
Jindal to develop collaborative
See INSTITUTE, Page 3A

WEATHER HI: 64
TOMORROW LO 40

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