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November 10, 2010 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-10

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IM TheSttemnt// edesdyNovmbr 1,701

I f Wednesday, November 10, 2010 // The Statement

statement
Magazine Editor:
Trevor Calero
Editor in Chief.
Jacob Smilovitz
Managing Editor:
Matt Aaronson
Deputy Editor-
Jenna Skoller
Designers:
Sara Boboltz
Corey DeFever
Photo Editor:
Jed Moch
Copy Editors:
Erin Flannery
Danqing Tang
The Statement is The Michigan
Daily's news magazine, distributed
every Wednesday during the
academic year.

THEGREENISSUE
random student interview by will grundler

elcome to the Random
Student Interview
Green Edition! We're
in the Samuel "Treehugger" Dana
Building, an environmentally
friendly place that used absolutely
NO paper during its construction.
What's your name?
Laura.
Do you think that the theory of
global warming should be taught in
public schools?
Yeah, for sure.
Please prove global warming in 10
words or less.
Um, ice melt, homeless polarbears -
There have to be verbs in there.
No coat necessary in November.
Some say the green movement was
started by hipsters. Your rebuttal?
I'd say it was started by science dorks.
But it's pretty cool to be green.
I think it's cool that it's trendy.

How do you think the concept of
sustainability goes against the spir-
itofAmerica?
Amierica's always about growth, and
bigger is better -
So it's threatening our way oflife.
I mean...threatening capitalism...peo-
ple don't take alot ofrisks into account.
I don't think Americans in the past
ordered immigrants to build this
nation of ours with the message,
"Oh, don't cut down those trees!
Hey, don't pollute those rivers!"
Do you think that nowadays we're
going against that?
Well, I thinkthat realistically you can't
just keep going at an unbridled pace.
You're going to run out of space. You're
going to run out of resources.
How wasteful do you try to be every
day?
Do I try to be? Minimally.
I see one, two, three, four, five plas-

tic things from here -
(Laughs.) I've got Wendy's in the Dana
Building. But I don't drive a car and I
recycle and -
I've heard they just throw recycla-
bles away.
I've heard that, too. But you've got to
try to think a little positively. What
about when we run out of space?
We have plenty of - I mean, Amer-
ica's the biggest country in the
world. I think. We have Alaska to
put extra people in, and Death Val-
ley. But next question: Last time I
checked, there's no animal or plant
heaven, so why should we care
about destroying other species?
I think that everything is intercon-
nected, so if you lose too many spe-
cies...
Moving on: Scientists tell us that
the level of carbon dioxide in the
atmosphere is nearly 400 parts per

million. Just how did they find 400
little molecules out of the other mil-
lions of molecules out there?
They spent a lot of time looking for
them.
Thought experiment: If we saved
all the forests and all the lakes and
all the animals and all the plants -
essentially, if we saved everything
in nature, which is the mission of
the green movement - how would
we value nature?
I think if you got to see it all the time
that you would be a happier person
and your quality of life would go up.
Well, I will say this: "Ferngully" is
one awesome movie.
I agree.
Up until the end, of course, which
is kind of a downer. You shouldn't
stop progress.

DANA BUILDING
LEED GOLD
BUDGET: $17.7 million
SQUAREFEET: 104,000 gross sq.ft.
SCHEDULE: Completed Winter 2003
SOLAR POWER: The Dana Building
employs both an active and passive
solar system. On the roof of the building, 30kW photovoltaic pan-
els provide enough energy to power the entire building. The 4,000
square-foot atrium skylight was also designed to provide natural
lighting for the interior of the building.
WATER CONSERVATION: All water faucets in the building are sen-
sor-activated and the urinals in the men's restrooms are waterless.
There are also three composting toilets, which decompose human
waste so it can be used as plant fertilizer.
RENEWABLE MATERIALS: Much of the material used in the con-
struction of the Dana Building is renewable. The countertops in the
mailroom were made from wheat straw, sunflower seed hulls, soy
flour and waste newspaper. The cork flooring in the 2nd floor con-
ference room was made from the bark of cork oak trees. And the
bamboo flooring on the 4th floor and plywood columns in the com-
mon room were made from grass.
DATA COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY

GREENING THE 'U'
A BRIEF LOOK AT THE GREENEST BUILDINGS ON CAMPUS AND
THE FEATURES THAT MAKE THEM SUSTAINABLE

f4

- Laura is an LSA junior.

The University of Michigan
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
PRESENTs a public lecture and reception
Pamela A. Raymond
Stephen S. Easter Collegiate Professor of
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

WRITING+SLC+NYC!
SERIOUSLY
INTERESTED INW
SERIOUSLY
INTO NEW YORK

With 8 million stories at your
doorstep ond 44 wooded ocres
at your feet, you'll have plenty
of material to work with.

Achieve your full potential as a writer
by enrolling in Sarah Lawrence College's
Spring Writing Semester in New York!
* Work one-on-one with SLC's distinguished
writing faculty
* Attend organized readings and literary
events on-campus and in NYC
* Receive 15 transferable academic credits
* Reside on SLC's suburban campus 30
minutes from Manhattan and interact
with SLC students and a supportive
community of successful writers

LAW SCHOOL ADDITION
BUDGET $102 million
SQUARE FEET: 116,000 gross
sq.ft
SCHEDULE: Completion
scheduled for Spring 2012
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
MEASURES: The Law School
addition has been designed
to surpass energy efficiency requirements by 30
percent. The design features to meet this goal
include: the use of infrared scans during con-
struction to check for missing insulation, gaps
in the enclosure and other deficiencies; low-flow
water fixtures; energy-efficient windows and the
use of occupancy sensors to reduce lighting levels
throughout the building.
OTHER SUSTAINABILITY FEATURES: The site is
situated near public and University bus routes and
there is no parking available on site to encourage
the use of public transportation. The landscaping
around the building uses only native plants and no
lawns, which eliminates the need for mowing.
DATA COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY-

41
t
t
r
/

HOSPITAL ADDITION
L E E D RT I FAIE D
BUDGET: $754 million
SQUARE FEET: 1,100,000 gross sq. ft
SCHEDULE: Completion scheduled for
Spring 2012
GREEN ROOF: The C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital's and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital's eco-friendly roof
is covered with sedum, a drought-resistant perennial groundcover,
which helps to reduce energy loss and insulate the building. The roof
is expected to lower heating and cooling costs by 50 percent over its
lifetime, which is three times longer than conventional roofs.
RECYCLED MATERIALS: More than 200 tons of concrete and asphalt
were collected from the site and used in the construction of the hos-
pital. In all, 93percent of the material gathered from the construction
site was used in the construction.
HOSPITAL FLOORS: Unlike in traditional hospitals, the floors are
special no-wax, no-buff floors that require less maintenance and thus
fewer chemicals to clean.
DATA COURTESY OF THEUNIVERSITY
THE BUSINESS SCHOOL
BUDGET: $145 million
SQUARE FEET 270,000 gross sq. ft.
SCHEDULE: Completed Fall2008
WATER EFFICIENCY: The irrigation systems
around Ross reduce potable water consumption by 55 percent. And the energy-
efficient features inside - automatic faucets, low-flush toilets, waterless uri-
nals - reduce potable water use by 42 percent.
ENERGY CONSERVATION: The building utilizes high-efficiency lighting and
daylight-dimming systems that reduce power requirements. Large skylights
allow natural lighting in offices and classrooms, and sensors in offices auto-
matically lower the heat when the rooms are unoccupied.
GREEN ROOF: Ross employs a similar green roof to that of the Children's and
Women's Hospital. Three separate roofs help filter rainfall and improve the air
quality of the building by trapping airborne dust and dirt. And, like the hospi-
tal, the roofs are planted with sedum to insulate the building and reduce heat-
ing and cooling costs.
DATA COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY

14
14

LESSONS FROM
FISH EYES
Thursday, November 11, 2010
4:10 pm # Rackham Amphitheater
Si For More Information Call (734) 615-6449

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