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November 10, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-10

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Noel Gordon writes that most bias incidents occur in subtle rather than overt ways. )) PAGE4A

GREEN I
, ISU 1

" How one professor's off-the-grid
house should be a model for future
construction efforts.

r.T first-person story
of on student who Ii
with waste.

P Illic i1 H1Z Hi l

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, November10, 2010

BURNING BUSHES

michigandaily.com
HE ALT H CoE VIO ATIGNE PA R T1 0F 2
Restaurants
make fixes to
address code
violations

Social Work student Sam Mast participates in a prescribed burn in the Arb coordinated by Natural Areas Manager Jeff Plakke yesterday. These burns take place every
spring, summer and fall in order to control exotic plants and promote native plant regeneration. For a photo slideshow of the burn, visit michigandaily.com.
M ENTAL HEALTH ON CAMPUS
'U' Ipands resources to address
ike in mntal health diagnoses

Several local
eateries cited for
'Critical violations'
earlier this year
By CAITLIN HUSTON
DailyStaffReporter
Would you like fruit flies with
that?
over the past six months, popu-
lar Ann Arbor restaurants and bars
have received health code viola-
tions for dirty cutlery, food cooked
at improper temperatures and the
presence of fruit flies.
But in interviews over the sum-
mer with The Michigan Daily,
local restaurant managers-and
owners of establishments with
violations said that these problems
have been corrected and their res-
taurants comply with all health
codes. A few owners permitted the
Daily to tour their cooking areas in
an effort to prove that changes had
been implemented.
Every restaurant in Ann Arbor
that is open year-round has unan-
nounced inspections twice a
year by the Washtenaw County
Environmental Health Division.
Inspection results are a matter of

public record on the Washtenaw
County Environmental Health
Department's website and are
divided into critical and non-crit-
ical categories according to the
Michigan Food Law.
There are eight sanitarians
who inspect restaurants, as well
as d4y care centers and swimming
pools across Washtenaw Coun-
ty. From Jan. 1 to June 30 there
were 1,304 critical violations and
4,473 non-critical violations in
the county, according to Kristen
Schweighoefer, an environmental
health supervisor for Washtenaw
County.
This summer, the Daily looked
into how some student hot spots
like Sava's State Street CafM, New
York Pizza Depot, Raja Rani and
Bar Louie held up to Washtenaw
County health inspection reports.
SAVA'S KITCHEN TEMP
HOTTERTHANUSUAL
In an exclusive tour given to the
Daily, Sava Lelcaj, owner of Sava's,
addressed her restaurant's previ-
ous critical violations. The res-
taurant received several counts of
food maintained at improper tem-
peratures, unclean food contact
surfaces and improper labeling of
See HEALTH CODE, Page 7A

Cause for increase
in depression,
anxiety diagnoses
still unclear
By ANNA ROZENBERG
Daily StaffReporter
In an effort to respond to a
spike in the number of students
diagnosed with depression on

campus and at colleges across
the country, University officials
are working to better accommo-
date the greater need and desire
for psychological services and
counseling.
According to the National
College Health Assessment
from Spring 2010, more than 11
percent of the 37,657 college stu-
dents from 65 post-secondary
institutions nationwide that
filled out the survey said they
suffered from depression. The

assessment reported that 18.A
percent of students reported
having anxiety, 20 percent had
trouble sleeping and 27.4 per-
cent of students surveyed said
they felt stressed.
Dr. Robert Winfield, direc-
tor of University Health Ser-
vices and chief health officer,
said data like this is pushing
University officials to work to
offer more resources to students
suffering from mental health
issues.

"I think that we in col-
lege health have all noticed an
increase in mental health issues,
and I want to be specific, I'm not
just talking about depression,
mental health issues," Winfield
said.
Winfield said he has noticed
an increase in anxiety, relation-
ship issues and attention deficit
disorders in recent years.
"We don't know if we're see-
ing more of something because
See MENTAL HEALTH, Page 7A

A GLOBAL UNIVERSIT Y
To track students abroad,
'U' launches new registry

SPEAKING OUT
-,

Website, which goes
live today, to aid in
contacting parents
in case of disaster
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
When an earthquake struck
Chile last February, a group of
University students was study-
ing abroad in the South American
country. But because the Uni-

versity had access to all of the
students' information and a satel-
lite phone, officials were able to
assure the students' parents that
they were safe.
The students' information was
available through the University's
current travel registry. But not all
students and faculty studying or
traveling abroad are registered
- something the University aims
to change with the launch of a
new online travel registry for stu-
dents, faculty and staff who travel
around the globe.
The registry, which went live

today, is located on Wolverine
Access and is accessible from
the University's Global Michi-
gan website. The new registry is
designed to centralize travelers'
data, make it easier for students
to register and for the University
to keep track of students and fac-
ulty abroad.
The University will also use
the website to more effectively
communicate travel advisories
and warnings, like the earth-
quake in Chile, to the University
community.
See REGISTRY, Page 7A

ARIEL BOND/Daily
A speaker at the SAPAC Speak Out event receives a flower and a hug after sharing her personal story at the Michigan League
last night. The event aims to give survivors of sexual violence a safe space to share their stories.

THE DOWNSIDE OF DEVELOPMENT
CVS construction forces
partial closure of State St.

Some restaurants
say roadwork is
hurting business
By SARAH THOMAS
For theDaily
For more than a week, State
Street has been blocked off with
a "Road Closed" sign between
East Washington and Liberty
Streets due to construction on a

new CVS pharmacy in the area.
Though the CVS under con-,
struction is not in the exact area
where the sign has been put in
place, the street has been sec-
tioned off to accommodate the
equipment necessary to complete
the construction.
Ralph Welton, chief develop-
ment official for the city of Ann
Arbor, said the closure is in part
due to complicated construction
necessary to preserve the front
See CONSTRUCTION, Page 7A

MSA decries use of live animals in flight course
W ith resolution, Health System's Survival Flight afterward is illegal. In addition, Varilone said the University should
Course. PETA representatives said human use simulators in the Survival
Assembly joins The Survival Flight Course has simulators are more effective Flight Course.
come under criticism lately for its training tools than animals. "The University has currently
PETA in publicly use of live animals in the training Within the University, the defended the practice and they
process for flight nurses. The most student organization Michigan haven't really addressed the objec-
condemning practice contentious aspect of the training Animals Rights Society has also tions such as why the American
course involves the use cats and protested the Survival Flight Heart Association and other ...
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR pigs for practicing medical proce- Course, advocating for the rights associations don't support the use
Daily StaffReporter - dures, including intubating. of the animals used in the class. of animals," Varilone said.
In September, People for the Public Policy junior Joseph In an October statement from
Members of the Michigan Stu- Ethical Treatment of Animals filed Varilone, a member of MARS, the Office of the Vice President
dent Assembly passed a resolution a complaint with the U.S. Depart- addressed the members of MSA for Research, University officials
nearly unanimously at their meet- ment of Agriculture against the last night about the assembly's stated that the point of using live
ing last night urging officials to Health System claiming that using need to urge the University to animals in the course isto prepare
replace live animals with simula- live animals for this type of train- change current policies that allow nurses for treating future patients.
tors in the University of Michigan ing and then euthanizing them for the use of live animals. Instead, See MSA, Page 7A

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