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November 02, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-02

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College Democrats and
Wolverines for Rick Snyder each '
~ D ELNG IE POITSmake acase for why you should
DU~lNG IEW OIN S ****"''r** o'sou' The Daily's basketball beat gives
gubernatorialpredictions for the 2010-2
candidate when you go to cast eason and breaks down the Big
your vote today. Ten competition
PAGE 4A NSIDE

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

michigandaily.com

ELECTION DAY 2010
A MAP TO CAMPUS VOTING

On election eve,
College Dems,
GOP rally to
get out the vote

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Candidates from
both parties discuss
Value of student vote
By BETHANY BIRON
Daily StaffReporter
In anticipation of today's mid-
term elections, both the University's
chapters of College Democrats and
College Republicans took part in
political rallies yesterday featuring
last minute words from candidates
highlighting their visions for the
state and encouraging students to
turn out at the polls.
The University's chapter of Col-
lege Democrats hosted an "Election
Eve Rally" at the Michigan Union

starting at 11 p.m. last night, which
included music and speeches from
candidates and their supporters.
Earlier in the evening, members
of College Republicans rallied at a
local Fix Michigan Center, which
is a state-wide organization that
promotes Republican ideologies
and has campaigned for Republican
support in the midterm election.
Republican gubernatorial candidate
Rick Snyder spoke at the College
Republicans event.
The College Democrats rally
featured talks from State Repre-
sentative Rebekah Warren (D-Ann
Arbor), who is currently running
for state Senate, Democratic candi-
date for Secretary of State Jocelyn
Benson and Debbie Dingell, politi-
See VOTE, Page 6A

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SCHOOL
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This Election Day, many local poling
locations have moved. In the map on
the left, yoa can find nhere yoa're
supposed to vote based on where you
live. Locate your residence on the map
and see what color your wardis Then
find the pollingplace of the same
color. That's where you vote.
First though, remember that voters in the
state of Michigan are required to present
valid photo identification at the polls
on Election Day in order to vote. Mcards
count asa valid form of photolD at
pollinglocations. Also the pollsopenat7
a.m.and close at 8 p.m. Voice Your Vote
says there are two key things to remem-
ber on Election Day. First, give yourself
time in casethere arelonglines. And,
second, don't let anyone tell you that
you cannot vote.
In Ward1 (again look at the map and see
whereyoulivetofigureoutwhich ward
and precinctyou're in), Precinct 7 voters
should goto PierpontCommons- not
Bursley Hall. Ward2,Precinct2vot-
ers should go to Palmer Commonsnot
Markley Hall. Voters in Precincts1 and 2
in Ward 3should head to the Michigan
League. Those votersused to go to East
Quad. In Ward 4, Precinct1, voters
shold goto the Michigan Onion - they
used to vote in South Quad.
Northwood Community Center is still the
polling locationfor Ward 2, Precinct1.
Also, Ward1, Precinctsland 2remain in
the Michigan Union and Ward 4, Precinct
3 polling is still at the Coliseum at the cor-
ner of Fifth Ave.and Hill Street.
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COMMUNIT Y H.S. L COMMUNIT Y CENT ER ~ TAPPAN MIDDLE SCHOOL
401 N. DIVISION 62S N. MAlN ST. 2251 E. STADIUM BLVD.
WARD 4-4 Fl1WARD 5-1
PIONEER H.S. ANN ARBOR DISTRICT LIBRARY
60 W. STADtUMBLVD. 343S. FIFTH AVE.

Ombuds talks concerns
over grievance process

When to cut off? Area bars
navigate rules on their own

Michael Welsh to
SACUA: Some
faculty allege
unfair treatment
By CAITLIN HUSTON
Daily StaffReporter
University Faculty Ombuds
Michael Welsh, who's also a biol-
ogy professor, discussed concerns
about the faculty arbitration pro-
cess in a speech to members of the
Senate Advisory Committee for
University Affairs yesterday.
Welsh addressed the issues he
has often seen as the University
faculty ombuds - an intermediate

who deals with members of fac-
ulty who file grievances against
their peers and the administra-
tion - at yesterday's SACUA meet-
ing.
Though Welsh told the leading
faculty governing body that the
majority of incidents he sees are
unique, he has dealt with many
complaints from faculty who
alleged that they did not receive
fair treatment from the Univer-
sity when they were faced with an
accusation. Faculty complained
they were not privy to the nature
of the accusations made against
them or to the identity of the
accuser, Welsh said.
Welsh added that he recogniz-
es the need to protect the safety
of the accuser but that the current

process may be too biased against
the accused.
"I can understand the need for
(confidentiality) in that there is a
concern for retribution, but who
are you going to go overboard in
protecting?" Welsh asked. "The
person who comes up with the
accusation? Yeah, I think you
need to protect those people, but
some people will use that protec-
tion and that shield to unjustly
accuse someone."
Ed Rothman, SACUA chair
and professor of statistics, said he
brought Welsh before the assem-
blybecause he wants the commit-
tee to play a more active role in
faculty grievances. He added that
if common issues were identi-
See SACUA, Page 3A

Unclear state laws
give little guidance'
on how to deal with
intoxicated patrons
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily StaffReporter
It's not uncommon at 1:30 a.m.
on a Saturday morning to find bar-
tenders at South University estab-
lishments politely telling certain
patrons it would be best if they
didn't take that next shot.
Though bartenders are mandated
by Michigan state law to "cut off"
these excessively drunk customers,
owners and managers of South Uni-
versity bars say they largely navi-
gate the enforcement guidelines

themselves.
Every bar and restaurant with
a liquor license is regulated by the
Michigan Liquor Control Commis-
sion. However, the commission has
no defined guidelines detailing how
bar owners and managers should
enforce liquor provisions.
Shannon Bush, Liquor Control
Commission district supervisor for
Lansing, said a commission data-
base tracks the certification of bar-
tenders and bar managers within
the state. Bush said at least one cer-
tified staff member must be in the
bar at all times, but heor she can be
certified by several different state-
approved programs.
One state-approved program is
Techniques for Alcohol Manage-
ment. David Puck, education coor-
dinatorat TAM, said thecurriculum
focuses on the clinical effects of

alcohol. Classes are taught in a
classroom, and certification must be
renewed every three years. While
there is no state-mandated cur-
riculum that teaches alcohol safety
and use, Puck said TAM teaches its
students how to enforce Michigan
state law.
"There really isn't a law that says
how to do it," Pucksaid.
Brad Wilson, the bar manager at
BTBCantina -theonly18and older
bar on South University Avenue -
said he is TAM certified. Accord-
ing to Wilson, BTB serves about
150 patrons on a busy night and the
staff cuts off alcohol service to about
a dozen of those patrons for being
intoxicated. Cuttingoff patrons is a
"touchy process,"Wilson said.
"It's my discretion," Wilson said.
"They kind of put it on my shoul-
See BARS, Page 6A

Boosting cognitive function could
be as easy as chatting with a friend

Link found between
social interaction,
cognitive tasks
By CLAIRE GOSCICKI
Daily StaffReporter
Increasing cognitive function
could be as easy as chatting with
a friend, according to a University
study released last week.
The study, led by psychologist
Oscar Ybarra, a researcher at the
University's Institute for Social
Research, measured 192 under-
graduates' performance on cog-
nitive tasks following 10-minute
conversations with one another.
The tasks measured mental pro-
cessing speeds, general knowledge
or executive functioning in the
brain.

Ybarra and his colleagues found
that friendly conversation boosted
memory, self-awareness and the
ability to suppress external and
internal distractions - essential
problem-solving skills.
The study also found that stu-
dents who conversed in a com-
petitive tone did not benefit
cognitively.
"We believe that performance
boosts come about because some
social interactions induce people
to try to read others' minds and
take their perspectives on things,"
Ybarra wrote in a University press
release.
In an interview, Ybarra said the
goal of the study was to show a
casual link between social interac-
tions and cognitive function.
"Much of the prior research is
survey-based and correlational, so
part of my motivation was to show,

with experiments, that there's a
causal influence which runs from
the social act or social connec-
tions to cognitive functioning," he
explained.
He added that he was surprised
to find that just a short period of
interaction can result in improved
mental functioning, and he plans
to continue exploring the rela-
tionship between socializing and
cognitive function, specifically
focusing on whether social inter-
actions can bring back lost cogni-
tive skills.
"One direction (for future
study) is to examine how social
connections can serve as a restor-
ative device ... such as looking at
the potential for social interactions
and social connections to help you
focus and maybe help restore cog-
nitive functioning," he said.
See STUDY, Page 6A

JAKE FROMM/Daily
Business sophornore Sam Magidsohn (left) and LSA sophomore Mitch Garnett raise a banner for the UM vs. OSU Blood
Battle outside the Michigan Union yesterday.

-------------- -.-- - -- ---

WEATHER HI:52
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