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November 01, 2010 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-01

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How the outcome of tomorrow's gubernatorial election will determine the future of Michigan's film tax incenti%

iC iga1T 4:)atlg

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 1, 2010

michigandailycom

S MICHIGAN STID NT A f3BLY
Armstrong
" seeks possible
disbarment of
assistant AG

MSA pres., attorney
allege Shirvell
violated professional
conduct code
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily News Editor
Michigan Student Assembly
President Chris Armstrong and
his attorney filed a pair of com-
plaints Friday against Andrew
Shirvell, a Michigan assistant
attorney general, seeking an
investigation and possible dis-
barment for attacks Shirvell
made against Armstrong.
The complaints, filed with the
Michigan Attorney Grievance
Commission, allege Shirvell vio-
lated multiple rules and guide-
lines in the Michigan Rules of
Professional Conduct - a set of
ehics standarcds th at everv attor-
ney in Michigan agrees to abide
by as part of becoming licensed
to practice in the state.
Armstrong and his attorney
Deborah Gordon each filed sepa-
tate complaints with the board.
"I felt that I could not stand
by and let Mr. Shirvell continue
his reckless, bullying behavior,"
Armstrong said in a statement.
The allegations stem from

an ongoing controversy sur-
rounding a blog, Chris Arm-
strong Watch, on which Shirvell
accused Armstrong of promoting
a "radical homosexual agenda"
and being an "elitist." Shirvell
also showed up at several events
on campus where Armstrong was
in attendance, including an MSA
meeting at which he called for
Armstrong to resign.
When contacted for comment
on the complaints, Shirvell's
attorney, Philip Thomas, said
he had not been notified about
them being filed, but said he was
"shocked" by the news.
"I don't understand it, I don't
understand what they're trying
to accomplish. I think they fear
that they're striking out because
they think that they're losing
ground," Thomas said, citing the
recent resolution of a personal
protection order against his cli-
ent and denial of a stalking com-
plaint against Shirvell.
"My client is the victim in all'
of this," Thomas said. "The only
thing this poor guy everdid, the
only thing Andrew ever did was
exercise his Constitutional right
to protest. And he did that. And
I just think this smells to high
heaven, I really do."
Gordon told The Michigan
Daily in an interview Friday that
See ARMSTRONG, Page SA

ARICL BOND/Daily
Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez at Beaver Stadium during Michigan's 41-31 lass to Penn State Saturday night.
Rodriguez'1notshowing
any progress this Season

STATE COLLEGE -
ack in August, when talk
surroumding the Michigan
football
season was
merely spccu-
lation upon
speculation
upon more
speculation,
brand new ath-
letic director RYAN
David Brandon KARTJE
was bombard- _
ed with ques-
tions about his football coach's job
security.

Rich Rodriguez, after all, had
won just eight games in two years,
including a measly three Big Ten
games.
So Brandon did his best to
deflect these questions - each
reporter wondering the same
thing: How many wins would it
take for Rodriguez to keep his job?
In an interview with long-time
radio host Jim Brandstatter at the
Detroit Economic Club, Brandon
said that "progress" will ultimate-
ly be what measures Rodriguez
or any other coach's job security,
according to the Detroit Free
Press.

"This crap about what's the
record got to be, it reduces those
decisions to something so simplis-
tic, it's almost insulting," Brandon
said.
"You get a variety of inputs
to measure the health of that
program and the leadership that
program is receiving and, based
on a variety of inputs, you make
decisions. That's what I do and
anybody in my job does. But it
isn't this, 'If you're 7-5 ....'That's
nonsense."
But watching the offense con-
stantly reeling was painful as its
defense probably couldn't shut

down a single Division-I team,
let alone a Big Ten one. Then, as
I watched Rodriguez push his
maligned defensive coordina-
tor out of the way to chastise his
defense per-.snally, it became
increasingly clear that there has
been very little semblance of any
so-called progress.
Sure, Rodriguez uncovered a
diamond in the rough in quarter-
back Denard Robinson, a super-
star who should be the face of the
Michigan football program for
his remaining years in Ann Arbor.
With Robinson at the center of
See KARTJE, Page 2A

Takin' it to the streets: Local
candidates hear riders' take

Ra
Im

andidate Yousef County Board of Commissioners,
this was no ordinary bus ride - it
bhi to bus riders: was a stop on the last leg of his cam-
paign.
What issues are Standing in the middle of an
, Ann Arbor Transportation Author-
iportant to youT ity bus, Rabhi introduced himself to
the surprised-looking passengers as
By DYLAN CINTI a political candidate eager to engage
Daily StaffReporter the community.
"I want to know what issues are
d in a smart blazer and crisp important to you," Rabhi told the
-down shirt, LSA senior passengers.
f Rabbi looked out of place on Rabbi's unconventional pre-
illed with otherwise casually- sentation was part of a week-long
d commuters heading home series of on-board "office hours"
day afternoon. in which local political candidates
for the 22-year-old Demo- rode AATA buses to raise awareness
candidate for the Washtenaw about a long-term, city-sponsored

planto improvebusingcountywide.
The plan - which is still in its
development phase - is an attempt
to gain community feedback in
order to implement concrete chang-
es to public transit, according to
Mary Stasiak, manager of com-
munity relations for the Ann Arbor
Transit Authority.
"We're not in this business just to
run buses," Stasiak said in an inter-
view on an AATA bus Thursday.
"We're really in the business to try
to enhance the quality of life in the
community."
According to Stasiak, short-term
changes could include adding stops,
extending routes and increasing
See AATA, Page SA

Read more at k University Police temporarily closed Hill Street between East University and Tappan early this morning
V MiChigan iDa after a suspicious package was found outside the Business School at 12:45 a.m. The police called in the
' Michigan State Police Bomb Squad to handle the situation. Forthe full story, see MichiganDaily.com.
ELECTION 2010
Schauer to supporters: 'We
understand what's at stake'

Cia
button
Yousef
a bus f
dresse
on Fri
But
cratic

Groups unite to fight Islamaphobia

In
elf

ref
V

final push before gressional district, rallied a small
group of Sierra Club supporters
ection day, U.S. on campus yesterday afternoon.
introduced by Sierra Club
. stresses youth President Robin Mann as a "prin-
cipled and great leader," Schauer
ote on campus took to the podium in the Michi-
gan Union Pond Room amidst
By MIKE MERAR applause from the Sierra Club
Daily StaffReporter members.
Schauer, who is running to
th Tuesday's election fast represent parts of Washtenaw
aching, Rep. Mark Schauer County as well as other areas in
ich.) of Michigan's 7th Con- southeast Michigan, immediately

told the crowd there is still time
to convince voters, and that the
last 48 hours are the most impor-
tant in determining the outcome
of the election.
"We understand what's at
stake," Schauer said.
Starting as a canvasser for a
citizen action group in college,
Schauer said his whole life has
been devoted to politics, and that
the problems of today cannot he
solved by the agenda of his oppo-
See SCHAUER, Page SA

Organizations from
across campus host
events aimed at
facilitating dialogue
By SARA BOBOLTZ
Daily StaffReporter
In light of recent anti-Islamic
sentiment around the country,
some student groups are working
in Ann Arbor to promote under-
standing and appreciation for one

another - with the ultimate goal
of eliminating "Islamaphobia" on
campus.
The groups have been organiz-
ing events - like I Love Muslims
Day and Pink Hijab Day - to help
facilitate a dialogue between stu-
dents of all religions at the Univer-
sity.
Last Monday, the Harvest Mis-
sion Community Church's Cam-
pus Ministry organized I Love
Muslims Day, which took place in
North Quad. About 60 members
of the Muslim Students' Associa-
tion attended, along with about 60

Christian students from12 campus
Christian organizations, like New
Life Church and Campus Crusade
for Christ.
After breaking into groups of
six - each with three Muslim stu-
dents and three Christian students
- the students participated in an
icebreaker and watched a presen-
tation called "Top 10 Reasons Why
We Love Muslims." A Halal din-
ner followed, along with a group
discussion.
Mark Vanderput, a former
pastor for HMCC who regularly
See ISLAMAPHOBIA, Page SA

Wit
appro
(D-M

WEATHER HI: 52 GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
TOMORROW news@myichigatidaily.comand let us know.

Nw WON MICHIGANDAILY.coM
Daily scavenger gets candy from 'U president.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLoGS/THE TABLE

INDEX NEWS...........
Vol. CXXI, No. 38 SUDOKU.......
c010TheMichiganDaily OPINION.......
michigondoily.com

.2A ARTS..............
.3A CLASSIFIEDS.......
.4A SPORTSMONDAY,

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