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October 20, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-10-20

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C Wednesday,c 00 /

FEEDER SCHOOLS
From Page 5
high yield rate.
But the numbers remain incon-
sistent for Malaysia. In 2009, a total
of only four students enrolled in
the University from the country. No
students from Universiti Teknologi
Sara even applied.
A combination of small decreases
in the numbers of enrolled students
from other countries and a higher
yield rate of students accepted has
made students from these four coun-
tries, primarily Malaysia in 2008, a
majority of international students
enrolling in the University.
-According to Stanford University
Sociology Professor Mitchell Ste-
vens, one cause of the shift is that
American universities are going
abroad more often to find interna-
tional students not only for their
academic ability, but as an economic
strategy as well.
"The entire elite sector of U.S.
higher education is moving toward
rucruitment of greater numbers
of students from abroad," Stevens
wrote in an e-mail. "The reasons: tal-
ent and revenue."
Stevens, who specializes in the
organizational sociology of higher
education, academic accomplish-
ment and alternative schooling,said
that the appeal of international stu-
dents to universities in the United
States increases with the growing
ease of receiving higher education
abroad.
"Steadily decreasing real costs of
transportation and communication
make international study ever more
feasible for ever more students," Ste-
vens said via email, "and U.S. schools
remain high-prestige destinations
for people from all over the world."
The growing desire to bring in
more international students has
brought about an increase in recruit-
ment from American universities in
sigh schools abroad.
Sanders attributed much of the
recruitment work done internation-
ally to alumni who live abroad and
are looking to expand knowledge of
and interest in the University.
"We have alumni clubs that will
host events that will ask if they can
volunteer," Sanders said. "So we have
an alumni student recruiter net-
work."
Abdul said that while she has
heard of other colleges coming to her
high school in Malaysia, the Univer-
sity had yet to be one of them, and
that in her experience, the Univer-
sity of Michigan was not necessarily
a popular school choice for students
from Malaysia. Abdul said Pennsyl-
vania State University, Purdue Uni-
versity and Drake University were
popular choices among the students

she knows.
"Although U of M isn't as popular
in Malaysia," Abdul said in an email,
"knowing in the back of my mind that
I'm going to a good school, get a good
education and excel in my field of
study is all that I need."
Sanders said international stu-
dents are a vital part of the growing
global awareness on campus.
"In terms of thinking of the Uni-
versity as a whole it's a community.

so wanting to create an atmosphere
that fosters education, part of that is
about a global community."
Stevens said that the increase in
international students in American
universities will notbe fadingout any
time soon.
"We will only see more recruit-
ment of international students, and
more initiatives abroad by U.S. uni-
versities in the coming years," Ste-
vens said.

TOP 20 ADMITTED, CONT'D
ANDOVER ............. .. . 69.80
DETROIT COUNTRY DAY ..... 69.20
GROSSE POINTE SOUTH ...... 67.00
WYLIE E. GROVES ............62.60
N. FARMINGTON ............62.20
TTROY ATHENS............ ...61.80
OKEMOS ....................61.00
SALINE ......................56.40
ROCHESTER ADAMS ..........55.60
CASS TECH .... ..............54.80
J-
SOURCE: OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
TOP 20 MATRICULATED, CONT'D
INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY ... 45.60
ROCHESTER ADAMS .......... 45.00
TROY ATHENS...............44.16
14 } DETROIT COUNTRY DAY ......42.00
14 SALINE ....................42.00
CRANBROOK ................40.33
17 OKEMOS .....................37.83
17 SEAHOLM ..................37.83
- ROCHESTER HIGH............33.83
RENAISSANCE ................33.30
*BOLD NUMBERS INDICATE A TIE
SOURCE: OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

TOP 10 OUT-OF-STATE HIGH
SCHOOLS: ADMITTED
AVERAGE NUMBER OF STUDENTS
ADMITTED / AVERAGE MATRICULATED
NEW TRIER 79.60 / 27.60
WINNETKA ILL.
S204 MILES TO THE UNION
HIGHLAND PARK 46.40 / 20.80
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL.
268 MILES TO THE UNION
3 HARVARD -WESTLAKE 45.20 /11.00
NORTH H OLLYWOOD, CALIF.
2,249 MIL ESTO THE UNION
3 ADLAI E. STEVENSON 45.20 / 14.60
LINCOLNSHIRE, ILL.
274 MILES TOTHE UNION
HORACE GREELEY 44.60 / 12.40
CHAPPAQUA, NY
633 MILES TO THE UNION
6 JERICHO SENIOR 43.20 / 13.80
JERICHO, NY
638 MILES TO THE UNION
7 STUYVESANT 42.20 / 11.80
NEW YORK, NY
609 MILES TO THE UNION
a BRONX H.S. OF SCIENCE 40.80 / 9.80
BRONX, NY
619 MILES TOTH E UNION
WALT WHITMAN 38.60 / 9.40
BETHESDA., MD
487 MILES TO THE UNION
WINSTON CHURCHILL 36.00/14.20
POTOMAC, MD

M I L

UNION

*BOLD NUMBERS INDICATE A TIE
SOURCE: OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

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