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October 20, 2010 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-10-20

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Wednesday, October 20, 2010 - 5A

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Wednesday, October 20, 2010 - 5A

PROJECT
From Page 1A_
"very helpful."
"The DDA has been giving us
parking stickers to give our cus-
tomers to pay for their parking,"
Hackett said.
The stickers give custom-
ers a free hour of parking any-
ACT
From Page 1A
approved loans for 36 Michigan
small businesses.
Despite the loans, some Ann
Arbor business owners don't
think the bill does enough to help
the types of small businesses that
are most commonly found in the
city.
Nicola Rooney of Nicola's
Books, an independent bookstore
located on Jackson Avenue, said
she doesn't believe the bill will
do anything to help her with her
business.
"I would be surprised if it
could do anything for retail,"
Rooney said. "My business is con-
strained by lack of people buying
books."
John Boyle, the owner of Ann
DINING
From Page 1A
mel color."
Whiteside added that two
or three years ago, seeking out
this information would have
required students to talk to hall
service members, adding that
though they have offered nutri-
tional counseling to students
with allergies for years, this is a
new way to offer students their
own tools to monitor their nutri-
tion.
"What we're trying to do with
this is make it easier for them to
identify and be connected," she
said.
In order to make information
as accessible as possible, White-
side said she is working with the
developers of the next Michi-
gan smart phone application to
include the same information
available on the website for stu-
dents on the go.
"We're always trying to,
improve the communication
pathway and give the iiforma-
tion to the students in their

where in Ann Arbor, which
allows Afternoon Delight to
offer a cheap parking alterna-
tive despite the construction, he
said.
Hackett added that while
so far the loss in business has
been gradual, he believes it will
increase in the wintertime.
Though his business has also
been affected by the construe-
Arbor's Orbit hair salon on State
Street, said he thinks larger busi-
nesses that are geared toward
manufacturing are more likely to
be eligible for the funds.
"We're probably less in the
position to take advantage of (the
bill)," Doyle said.
State Street Barbershop owner
Bill Stolberg also said that based
on past experience, he thinks his
business is too small to be eligible
for the aid.
"I've been in this business
37 years and I haven't received
a dime from any government,"
Stolberg said.
While many business owners
remain skeptical, Kyle Mazurek,
vice president of Government
Affairs & Administration at the
Ann Arbor / Ypsilanti Regional
Chamber of Commerce, said inan
e-mail interview that he remains

tion, Herb David of Herb David
Guitar Studio says online busi-
ness has made up for the lack of
walk-up customers.
Susan Pollay, executive direc-
tor of the DDA, said that even
though the construction hurts
local businesses now, it will help
them in the end. According to
the DDA, the goal of the project
is to strengthen the connection
hopeful that the act will have a
positive impact on small busi-
nesses.
. "One of the issues most fre-
quently cited by small businesses
seeking to grow inthis economyis
a lack of access to capital," Mazu-
rek wrote. "The Small Business
Jobs Act seeks to remedy this to
a certain degree by, for example,
extending ,and enhancing SBA
lending programs, by creating a
$30 billion fund for local commu-
nity banks to lend to area small
businesses, by channeling $79
million into the MEDC's State
Small Business Credit Initiative,
by providing small businesses
with some favorable tax treat-
ment, etc."
Mazurek added that he thinks
the act will be effective in help-
ing small businesses because it
addresses the issues they face

between the campus and Main
Street areas and have more
overall activity downtown, by
doing things like adding extra
parking spaces.
"It's never easy to be near
construction," Pollay said.
"Construction has a short-term
(negative) impact, but the long-
term goal is to strengthen this
situation."
comprehensively.
He wrote that the bill doesn't
just give small businesses access
to capital, it also deals with small
business tax treatment, support
services, exporting and contract-
ing.
But Donald Grimes, a senior
research associate at the Uni-
versity's Institute for Research
on Labor Employment and the
Economy, wrote in an e-mail
interview that it is still too soon
to determine which types of busi-
nesses will benefit from the bill,
adding that he doesn't have an
idea at this point of how effective
the bill will be.
"My guess is that'it would be a
very small positive impact (with
the emphasis on small), but I
don't have any solid foundation
to base that analysis on," Grimes
wrote.

BEATTY
From Page 1A
purchased cocaine, according to a
July 8 Daily article.
Before handing downthe sentence,
Shelton asked Beatty when he'd
last used narcotics, to which Beatty
replied that he hadn't used any drugs
since his arrest - a claim Beatty said
he'd be willing to prove with a drug
test.
Shelton then sent Beatty to consult
with an in-court probation officer
before sentencing.
In the elevator down to the court-
house probation office, Beatty
remained silent as his lawyer Thomas
Moors declined to offer any comment
on the case.
Beatty met with a probation offi-
cer for about fifteen minutes before
returning with Moors to the court-
room for sentencing.
In defending his client, Moors said
he's known Beatty since Beatty was

12 years old and has complete faith
in his ability to bounce back from a
drug-related problem.
Just prior to his sentencing, Beatty
briefly expressed remorse to Shelton
in a quiet and halting voice.
"At this point I just seek for-
giveness ... from the court, the law
enforcement community and more
importantly from the University of
Michigan Department of Public Safe-
ty," Beatty told Shelton.
In passing down the sentence,
Shelton said Beatty's personal losses
- including the loss of his job after
16 years of employment - would
outweigh any punishment the court
would hand down.
"You're personally goingto be pun-
ished far beyond this court," Shelton
said before sentencing Beatty to pro-
bation.
In addition to serving probation,
Shelton ruled that Beatty must. pay
over $500 in court costs and continue
attending an outpatient substance
abuse treatment program.

WANT TO WRITE FOR
DAILY NEWS?
E-mail berman@michigandaily.com
to get started.
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hands in the way that they want
it," she said.
The online menus, which have
traditionally labeled healthy,
"vegan" and "vegetarian,"
entrees now have two new labels
- Halal and gluten-free.
Whiteside said recent height-
ened awareness about glu-
ten allergies didn't prompt
the change in campus dining.
Instead,'the availability of more
gluten-free products made it eas-
ier for the dining halls to accom-
modate students' allergies.
"Five years ago it was real-
ly difficult to find gluten-free
bread products," she said. "You
could purchase them at the gro-
cery store, you could purchase
them online, but as large scale
purchasers, we couldn't find a
source to bring gluten-free prod-
ucts to campus."
Today, every dining hal offers
gluten-free hot dog buns, slider
buns, pizza crusts and sandwich
breads.
Even with the new program,
students can still opt for one-
on-one counseling. Additionally,
brochures are offered on site

with information on healthy eat-
ing and specific diets.
Whiteside said the variety of
options allows students to man-
age their allergies in their own
ways.
"Students do different
things," she said. "Some of them
don't want anyone to know
about their allergy, and they
manage it themselves and that's
perfectly fine, but others come
to us for assistance and we help
them."
University Housing spokes-
man Peter Logan said the pro-
gram is extremely specific and
designed to aid every student
with allergies based on his or her
need.
"I find it interesting that a
school as large as Michigan, that
is basically approaching 10,000
meal plans, can provide that per-
sonal contact and counseling,"
he said.
Whiteside said she has found
the student response to the
online ingredient listings to be
enthusiastic. Since the nutrition
website has launched, there has
been a decrease in the number of

students seeking nutrition coun-
seling, she said.
"I find that most students
explore the website," she said.
"Most of the calls I get are from
parents."
For students like LSA sopho-
more Benjamin Cassidy, who
'didn't report his gluten allergy to
the University initially, the new
website provides a more discreet
way to manage food allergies.
"I've always been kind of
private about my allergy, and I
wanted my college experience
to be as normal as possible," he
said.
Though Cassidy said he ulti-
mately opted for a counsel-
ing session with Whiteside to
receive more information, he
said he thinks the website will
be helpful to students in his situ-
ation.
"I think anything that bet-
ter informs students about what
they're eating is a positive thing,"
he said.

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