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October 20, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FEEDER SCHOOL TURNOVERS,
Where do the students that mae LAPSES AND
up the University student body
come from? As it turns out, largely, LETDOWN
the same places. PAGE1Cu

Full coverage of Michigan's
38-28 loss to Iowa on
Saturday in the Big House as
the Wolverines head into a
eweek.
&I, . PAGE 1B

belllidjigan&iaIVj

Ann Arbor, Michigan
STORES NEAR CONSTRUCTION
Fifth Ave.
lot project
said to drop
sales 20%

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

michigandaily.com

Jerusalem Garden,
* Earthen Jar owners
complain of blocked
traffic through area
By K.C. WASSMAN
For the Daily
Restaurants on and around the
300 block of South Fifth Avenue
are losing business because of con-
struction on the lot near the Ann
Arbor District Library, owners say.
The block between East Liberty
and East William streets has been
closed since August due to the
construction of an underground
parking structure in the space and
is scheduled to reopen to through
traffic in mid-to-late 2011.
In the mean time, the owners
of Jerusalem Garden, Afternoon
Delight and Earthen Jar estimate
they've lost anywhere from 10-
to 20-percent of their customers
because of the construction, which
has caused a lack of traffic flow and
limited parking for the block.

While some of the business
owners on the street said they
believe the construction is worth-
while, Ali Ramlawi, owner of
Jerusalem Garden, said he thinks
the construction is somewhat of a
waste.
"It definitely does not even come
close to being worth it, unless
they're digging for gold," Ramlawi
said.
Sim Sethi, manager at Earthen
Jar, has a different take on the con-
struction. Sethi said he knew when
the city announced the closure
of Fifth Ave. business would be
adversely affected, but he thinks
the construction is for the best
because in the end it will provide
more access to businesses in the
area by providing extra parking.
Tom Hackett, owner of After-
noon Delight, a diner located
on the corner of Liberty Sreet
and Fifth Avenue, said he thinks
the lack of parking on the street
affects his business, though he
said the Ann Arbor Downtown
Development Authority, which is
spearheading the project, has been
See PROJECT, Page 5A

Michigan Student Assembly President Chris Armstrong talks to supporters after the Ann Arbor City Council meeting on Monday night.
A 2
2Council s pp rt rsouio
conde-mning Shirvell, bullying,

Res
Ar
e
,At
attend
Assem
strong
Counc

olution criticizes a resolution that condemns
the actions of Michigan Assis-
adrew Shirvell's tant Attorney General Andrew
Shirvell.
'mployment in Shirvell - currently on a leave
of absence from his post in the
Lich. AG s office attorney general's office - has
been the subject of recent national
By DYLAN CINTI attention for his blog Chris Arm-
Daily StaffReporter strong Watch, on which he pub-
licly accuses Armstrong of having
a meeting Monday night a "radical homosexual agenda."
led by Michigan Student The resolution, passed by the
bly President Chris Arm- Michigan Civil Rights Com-
the Ann Arbor City mission on Oct. 12, criticizes
il unanimously backed Shirvell's continued employment

in the Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral, according to an Oct. 13 press
release from the MCRC.
"The Commission is ... con-
cerned about the scope and nature
of the involvement of (Shirvell) in
the execution of the work of the
Officeof the Attorney General,"
the press release stated.
The resolution also seeks to
prevent "the trauma of bullying
and other dangerous abuse," the
press release stated.
At Monday night's council
meeting, Armstrong sat in the
audience and watched as several

supporters addressed council and
voiced opinions in favor of the
resolution.
Andre Wilson, a member of the
city-sponsored Ann Arbor Human
Rights Commission, urged coun-
cil members to support the reso-
lution because it conveys a strong
message against intolerance.
"The ongoing harassment of
anyone is a cause of concern,"
Wilson told the council members.
"When Chris is targeted, we're all
targeted."
Wilson, who's openly gay, said
See COUNCIL, Page 3A

CONSTRUCTING A COMMUTE FEDERAL POL Y SLOCAL IMPACT
Small Business Act will have little
effect on area business, owners say

Despite praise from
politicians, local
shopkeepers wary
of new policy
By JENNA SIMARD
Daily StaffReporter
The Small Business Jobs Act
passed by Congress last month
aims to help small businesses by
lending up to $300 billion nation-
wide and $18 million in Michigan
to small business owners. But

despite the efforts of politicians
in Washington, business owners
in Ann Arbor are skeptical of the
bill's ability to help them.
Though the act would pro-
vide credit and funding for all
states, Michigan politicians are
especially supportive of the bill
because of the state's economic
woes. In a press release issued
earlier this month U.S. Reps.
John Dingell (D-Mich.), Sander
Levin (D-Mich.) and Gary Peters
(D-Mich.) said the bill is one of
the keys to promoting economic
development in Michigan.
"It is our small business-

men and women who will make
Michigan's economic engine
hum again," Dingell said in the
press release. "I expect our state
officials to take quick action and
make sure we have the increased
access to capital that this bill will
provide. The new funds provid-
ed, as well as tax cuts created by
this Congress, will spur growth
and hiring on Main Street."
According to a separate press
release by U.S. Senators Debbie
Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Carl
Levin (D-Mich.), the U.S. Small
Business Administration has
See ACT, Page 5A

Isaiah Ford works on the final stages of construction on the Central Campus Transit Center yesterday.

/Daiy

CAMPUS CRIME
Former DPS officer sentenced
to probation for cocaine charges

CAMPUS CAFETERIAS
'U' dining website to help manage allergies

Ch
arr
"My
an abri

iarles Beatty III said former University police officer
Charles Beatty III as he prepared to
ested in January receive his sentence from Washt-
enaw County Court judge Donald
while off-duty Shelton yesterday afternoon.
Shelton sentenced Beatty to 18
By DYLAN CINTI months of probation stemming
Daily StaffReporter from his January arrest for cocaine
possession.
'transgressions have brought Beatty was arrested on Jan. 13
upt end to a 16-year career," in Ypsilanti when cocaine and an

open container of alcohol were
found in his car, according to an
article last month in The Michigan
Daily. Beatty was off-duty at the
time of his arrest.
Beatty's arrest came after a
months-long investigation by the
Washtenaw Narcotics Enforce-
ment Team's Major Case Team
into allegations that Beatty had
See BEATTY, Page SA

New website allows
students to search
meals by ingredient
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
For students with gluten aller-
gies and other unique eating
circumstances, more specific
information about the ingredients
in the food available in the dining
halls is now at their fingertips.

University Dining Services
is currently continuing devel-
opment of the University din-
ing website to make nutritional
resources as accessible for view-
ers as possible.
The website, which contains
a section titled "My Nutrition,"
allows students to check for aller-
gens and caloric content of dining
hall entrdes. Website users can
view menus, click on a specific
allergen and then apply filters to
show a list of all of the foods that
do not contain the allergen speci-

fied.
Kathryn Whiteside, University
menu and nutrition information
manager, said the benefit of the
program is that it allows students
to view every single ingredient
in a given dish - out of the more
than 4,000 options available.
"There are students who are
allergic to very specific things,"
she said. "For example if you are
allergic to caramel color, you can
search our ingredient list and
find the foods that have the cara-
See DINING, Page 5A

WEATHER HI: 58 GOTA NEWS TIP?
T W L:48 Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
TOMORROW news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Cross nets co-Big Ten freshman of the week.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/TH E GAME

INDEX NEWS ...................
Vol. CXXI,No.30 OPINION..............
c2OO The Michigan Daily ARTS ...................
michigondailycom

..2A CLASSIFIEDS......................6A
..4A SPORTSWEDNESDAY........... 1B
.6A THE STATEMENT.................1C

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