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October 13, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-10-13

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I LIKE IT NOT IN MY NEWS FEED: Why Noel Gordon thinks the breast cancer awareness campaign on Facebook is an ineffective fad. 2 P
H "W OSWHOSE MONEY?
th Pae rs" n College basketball and football players
a egenerate millions for their universities
every year. How come they see none of it?
Ube ic41yan 0aiI

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

michigandaily.com

LjNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL
Law School to
launch clinic to
fight trafficking
in Mexican city

Ora Pescovitz, the University's executive vice president for medical affairs, speaks at a ceremony celebrating a $14 mllion partnership between the University's Medical
School and Peking University Health Science Center in Beijing. At the event, Pescovitz re-affirmed the importance of University partnerships with chinese institutions.
P scovit mphasizs
value of ' China tis

'U' received grant
from State Dept. to
open similar clinic to
one in Ann Arbor
By SARA BOBOLTZ
Daily StaffReporter
The University Law School
recently received a $300,000 grant
to expand its work fighting human
trafficking to the international
arena.
The grant comes from the U.S.
Department of State's Office to
Monitor and Combat Trafficking in
Persons and it will be used to help
the Law School opena clinic in
Zacatecas, Mexico that will accept
cases dealing with human traf-
ficking. The clinic's structure will
be modeled after the University's
existing Law School Human Traf-
ficking Clinic, which was launched
in 2009 as the first clinic of its kind,
according to a press release distrib-
uted last week.
Bridgette Carr, the clinic's
director, said in the press release
that the grant will enable the clinic
to extend the work law students do
in Ann Arbor to the international
level.
"By awarding us the grant, the
State Department acknowledged
that the success of our clinic could
be replicated elsewhere," Carr said
in the press release. "We're excited

about this new venture and look
forward to helping victims in Mex-
ico."
Establishing the clinic will
require a combined effort from the
University of Michigan, the law
school Unidad Acaddmica de Dere-
cho at the Universidad de Aut6no-
ma de Zacatecas and Centro de
los Derechos del Migrante, Inc., a
non-governmental organization
that aims to promote awareness
of workplace rights in the United
States for migrant workers.
Stephen Warnath, director of the
NEXUS Institute, an anti-human
trafficking organization based in
Washington D.C., will also act as
a partner on the project. Warnath
will help analyze the success of the
project at its completion, according
to clinical fellow Meredith Weill,
who is assisting with the project.
Several University law students
will accompany Carr and Weill to
Mexico, where the group will train
students and faculty from the Uni-
versidad de Autonoma de Zacate-
cas and help with various cases.
Weill said that though the group
will draw on lessons learned from
the University's human traffick-
ing clinic, the new clinic won't be
identical. Instead the clinic will be
largely in the hands of the Mexican
institutions.
"We're not exporting Ameri-
can clinical education," Weill said.
"The idea is that we have expertise,
we'll be a resource for them, we'll
See CLINIC, Page SA

As critics looked
on, 'U' rep. read
freedom of speech
statement to crowd
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily News Editor
At a ceremony on campus to
formalize a new joint partnership
with a leading Chinese Univer-
sity yesterday, University officials
strongly reaffirmed their support

for interna-
tional collabo-
ration.
The signing
ceremony was
meant tobe an
opportunity
for represen- KYLE SWANSON
tatives from Covering the
the University A . ion
of Michigan Admmistrat
Health System and Peking Uni-
versity Health Science Center to
formally sign an agreement to
establish a $14-million partner-
ship to focus on cardiac, liver and

pulmonary diseases. However,
throughout the event, officials
from the University focused on
the importance of partnerships
with Chinese institutions.
The defense of the Univer-
sity's Chinese partnerships came
while a small group of critics who
oppose the University's involve-
ment with China sat among the
audience. And while the critics -
including some who have spoken
publicly before the University's
Board of Regents about their con-
cerns in regards to the University
giving too much attention and

preference to China while issues
confront the University at home
- didn't publicly protest during
the event, University organizers
read a statement at the start of the
ceremony to warn against inter-
rupting the event.
Speaking at the event, Ora
Pescovitz, the University's execu-
tive vice president for medical
affairs, emphasized the impor-
tance of partnering with Peking
University Health Science Center.
"This partnership provides
us with a unique opportunity to
See CHINA, Page SA

MEDICAL MARIJUANA SERIES, PART TWO OF FOUR ULTIMATE FALL AFTERNOON
Who is eligible for medical
pot? Debate is far from over

'U' doctors made
guide detailing
drug's effects on
different conditions
By SUZANNE JACOBS
DailyStaffReporter
Though medical marijuana was
legalized in Michigan in 2008,
debate is still raging over which
patients are eligible to use the

treatment.
According to the Michigan
Medical Marijuana Act, medical
patients in the state of Michigan
who want to use marijuana to treat
their conditions must first obtain
registry identification cards from
the Michigan Department of Com-
munity Health - a process that
has ignited controversy over who
should be allowed to use the drug.
And with limited research on the
drug that is backed by the federal
government, many physicians are
hesitant to suggest it asa treatment

option, though patients and advo-
cates swear by the drug's medical
efficacy.
Between April 6, 2009 and Oct.
8, 2010, the department received
65,816 new or renewal applications.
So far it has approved 35,802 and
denied 7,938 of those applications.
Most of the denied applications
were incomplete, according to the
department's website.
To apply for a card, a patient
needs written certification from a
licensed physician verifying that
See MARIJUANA, Page 6A

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Supporters: Open housing may be
an option for students by next fall

LSA freshman Mary Bridget Welch relieves midterm stress by playing frisbee in the Law Quad yesterday.
Service organization to launch declaration
in honor of Peace Corps's 50th anniversary

Group to present
report to Housing
brass in December
By ROBIN VEECK
Daily StaffReporter
Members of the Open Housing
Initiative were optimistic at last
night's Michigan Student Assem-

bly meeting about the possibility of
making gender-neutral housing an
option available to students next
fall.
Allison Horky, co-chair of the
Spectrum Center Student Advisory
Board, spoke at last night's meet-
ing about the Open Housing Ini-
tiative's progress and goals for the
coming months. The student group
is currently assembling a report to
present to residence hall adminis-

trators this December.
"We needed a more detailed
report, we needed logistics, we
needed survey data, all of these
variable things that show, a varied
amount of different kinds of sup-
port," said Horky, who's a Social
Work student.
Horky said in an interview after
the meeting that the goal of estab-
lishing an open housing option isnto
See HOUSING, Page 5A

ServiceWorld aims
to send 100,000
volunteers abroad
By LEE SOVA CLAYPOOL
For the Daily
Fifty years ago, then-presiden-
tial candidate John F. Kennedy
encouraged University students

to pursue international service
opportunities in an unscripted
speech delivered at 2 a.m. on the
steps of the Michigan Union. This
speech, along with the subsequent
efforts of many Michigan stu-
dents, ultimately led to the forma-
tion of the Peace Corps.
The organization ServiceWorld
is harnessing this memory and
aiming to take ita step forward by
launching its International Ser-

vice Declaration tonight as part of
the University's 50th anniversary
celebration of the Peace Corps.
ServiceWorld representative Jack
Sibley said the group chose to
launch the petition in conjunction
with the Peace Corps celebration
because they wanted to begin cir-
culation of their declaration in a
similar atmosphere to the one in
which the petition that started the
See SERVICEWORLD, Page SA

WEATHER
TOMORROW

HI: 63
LO: 42

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INDEX NEWS. ..............
Vol. CXXI,No.27 OPINION...............
02t1tThe MichiganDaily CLASSIFIEDS.
michiyvvdeily.cvm

.2A ARTS...................
.........4A SPORTS ...............
.........6A THE STATEMENT.

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