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6A - Friday, September 24, 2010
FLAGSHIP
From Page 1A
new online courses for students
who have reached an advanced
language level will be offered in
the winter semester.
As part of the program's initial
three-year grant, from 2008-2011,
the University's program operates
in partnership with the University
of Texas at Austin and Michigan
State University.
However, Rammuny wrote in
an e-mail interview that the pro-
gram will apply to become an
independent center for the next
academic year.
Rammuny added that though
the application process is "com-
petitive," he feels the large enroll-
ment numbers in the program, as
well as its development of creative

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

research studies and language
courses, will work in the pro-
gram's favor.
Rosenberg echoed Rammuny's
optimism, saying she is confident
the program will become an inde-
pendent center.
As the flagship program pro-
gresses, students are also strongly
encouraged to spend a year or
summer studying abroad at the
flagship sites of Alexandria Uni-
versity in Egypt and the University
of Damascus in Syria, Rosenberg
said. Students with a high level of
proficiency are able to attend the
yearlong curriculum, while those
with lower proficiency levels can
take part in the summer program.
Rosenberg said this is the first
year that University students in
the program traveled abroad for
the summer program. Two stu-
dents participated in the yearlong

program after completing courses
in the program's first year.
Students can also take part in
an extracurricular Arabic cultural
club, in which they can practice
speaking or receive tutoring.
When students graduate from
the program, they receive a certifi-
cate stating that they have reached
an L3, or professional proficiency
level. Rosenberg said this desig-
nation is an important resource
when looking for a job, as a vari-
ety of employers want employees
who can speak critical world lan-
guages.
Rosenberg added that because
the flagship program is govern-
ment-funded, many students are
able to find jobs in the public sec-
tor.
LSA senior Valerie Montes, who
is in her third year of the program,
said she feels her experience in

the program will make her a more
employable job applicant.
"I think it will be pretty easy to
find opportunities," Montes said.
"I just have to decide what direc-
tion I want to go in."
Montes, who studied abroad ina
yearlong program, added that her
experience overseas was invalu-
able to helping her achieve fluency
in Arabic.
The University has also applied
to the International Institute of
Education to establish a Chinese
Flagship Center, which will be
housed in the Department of Asian
Languages and Cultures. The
status of the application will be
determined in December, however
department and University offi-
cials declined multiple requests
for comment on the center, veri-
fying only that an application has
been submitted.

EARTHFEST
From Page 1A
tips include using refillable water
bottles, closing windows when air
conditioning is on, using energy
saving computer settings and pur-
chasing "green" products.
The event was designed to
publicize the University's new
approach toward conservation,
dubbed "integrated assessment"
by its organizers. Since the offi-
cial creation of the University's
Office of Sustainability by Univer-
sity President Mary Sue Coleman
in October of last year, the new
initiative has aimed to employ
all available campus resources to
achieve the goal of a greener cam-
pus.
Andrew Berki, manager of the
University's Office of Sustain-
ability, said EarthFest improved
upon an event called Energy Fest,
which the University held for the
last ten years.
"Energy Fest was focused
mainly on energy reduction and
the operational programs that we
have on campus," he said. "This
year we wanted to make it a broad
sustainability event instead of just
about energy reduction, and we
wanted to include other groups as
well as operational units."
The University drew from
every possible resource to achieve
a broader approach for the event,
Berki said.
"It complements a holistic
view of campus," he said. "Not
just operations, but teamwork
between operational efforts, aca-
demic efforts, research efforts and
student involvement and activity."
As a result, 32 organizations,

TWITTER
From page 1A
investors by tweeting," a press
release about the study distribut-
ed last week states.
Scott Hirth, manager of The M
Den, said the retailer uses their
Twitter account, @TheMDen, to
announce new products and infor-
mation about in-store events to
their 1,655 followers.
"We've been around for a lot of
years, using a variety of different
advertising mediums, but using
Twitter to let a lot of people know
about something instantaneously
has been successful," Hirth said.
Jim Millan, owner of Bella
Italia Pizza and Pasta of Ann
Arbor, located at 895 West Eisen-
hower Pkwy., said he uses the
restaurant's Twitter account, @
BellaItaliaA2, to hold contests and
announce the restaurant's deals of
the day.
"Last summer we did a contest
where almost every day we would
give away a free pizza to people
who 'followed' us on Twitter,"
Millan said. "The first five people
who came in and mentioned the
tweet got a free slice or free pizza.
We got a good following out of it."
Along with the benefit of inter-
acting with the restaurant's 705
YOGA
From Page 1A
lived as a freshman - giving free
lessons to students. Because stu-
dents are often on a tight budget,
Kest said his yoga studio offers stu-
dent discounts.
The Center for Yoga, which has
three other locations around south-
east Michigan, offers Hatha-based
yoga, a style of yoga that dates back
to 15th Century India. The East
William location currently offers
two types of classes - hot Vinyasa
and Vinyasa flow.
Juliana Khalifeh, an instructor
at multiple locations of the Center
for Yoga who was previously a stu-
dent at the yoga studio, said she's
glad tobe teaching at the new loca-
tion, because she says teaching stu-
dents is a unique experience.
"I love it. There's nothing quite
like it," Khalifeh said. "Teaching
up here is really great because you
get to teach to students that are
a little bit younger and a little bit
more open and looking for spiri-
tuality, and I think it's something
important in these years of a young
person's life to have this kind of
spiritual grounding and element."

Twitter followers ina more engag-
ing way, Millan said he likes that
Twitter is fast and free to use.
"Instead of spending money on
advertising, I am spending money
on the customers for the promo-
tion," Millan said.
Another local business, the
Produce Station, uses their @
producestation Twitter account
to inform customers when they
get unique and fresh ingredients
in the store, located at 1629 State
Street.
According to Andrew Gorsuch,
the gourmet market's general
manager, tweeting about seasonal
produce to their 549 followers has
proven to be "an effective way to
communicate quickly with cus-
tomers about cool products with-
out having to spend a lot of time."
Being able to connect with their
followers and posting pictures
of new produce on Twitter has
"attracted customers for sure,"
Gorsuch said.
Chris Hanrath, a University
alum who graduated in 2009, said
he often uses Twitter to learn
about discounts and promotions.
"I go to places for dinner
because they tweet something like
50-percent off your meal," Han-
rath said. "I look at Twitter and
use pretty much any discount if it's
worth going to the business."
LSA senior Ashley Musiker
started taking classes at the Center
for Yoga's West Stadium Boulevard
location in August, but has since
switched to the East William loca-
tion. She said that so far, her experi-
ence has been very gratifying.
"It's been really great physically
and mentally," Musiker said. "I feel
stronger and more in shape and it
helps with mental clarity and deal-
ing with stress."
Business School senior Sandra
Fadel, who just finished her first
class at the Center for Yoga, said
she's taken yoga classes at the Cen-
tral Campus Recreation Building
before, but much prefers the atmo-
sphere of the new studio.
"(There were) less people, a dif-
ferent environment, not as crowd-
ed, I would say," Fadel said. "Plus I
have to say the instructor is young-
er so you relate to her more."
LSA senior Pranadhi Koradia
asked another student who came
out of the studio about her experi-
ence, as Koradia said she's inter-
ested in taking a class sometime in
the future.
"This is a really good location,"
Koradia said. "I haven't attended a
class yet but I hear it's really good.
It's a good break from routine."

0

MARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily
Architecture senior Michael Herrick signs a pledge to protect the environment at Earthfest on the North Campus Diag yesterday.

including the Michigan Animal
Rights Society, the Michigan Sus-
tainable Foods Initiative, U-M
Green It and Strategies for Ecol-
ogy Education and Development,
participated in the event.
Sarah Romanski, senior admin-
istrative assistant at the Graham
Institute, said EarthFest also pre-
sented an important opportunity
for environmental action groups
to recruit members and to get peo-
ple involved.
"Undergraduate applications
for the Graham Institute are com-
ing out in a couple of months,"
Romanski said. "And we have a
town hall meeting coming up that
we are trying to advertise."
O4both Tuesday and Thursday,
a massive pile of trash sat on the
pavement of the venues as volun-

teers sorted the recyclable materi-
als from landfill trash.
LSA sophomore Cydney Sieg-
erman worked at the trash sort
and recycling booth. She said her
activity showed students that dis-
posing of trash properly is an easy
way to play a part in the greater
movement toward environmental
action.
"We should make sure as indi-
viduals and as a group to be envi-
ronmentally safe and to make the
University a more environmental-
ly-friendly campus," Siegerman
said.
Berki said the trash-sorting
booth, which sorted through
one day's worth of garbage from
Mason and Angell Halls, helped
show students the impact of their
actions. 17 trash bags out of the

42 total bags - about 40 percent
- that were collected contained
recyclable content, he said.
"We viewed that as a teachable
moment for the campus commu-
nity," Berki said.
In the wake of EarthFest's
success, Berki said students and
other members of the Ann Arbor
community should look out for
more environmentally-friendly
messages and changes around
campus as a result of the Inte-
grated Assessment sustainability
movement.
"We want to continue work-
ing with students and groups on
campus to spread the word about
being a green Wolverine," Berki
said. "It's a growing program at U
of M, and it's something everyone
ought to be proud of."

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RELEASE DATE- Friday, September 24,
Los Angeles Times Dc
Edited by Rich Norris a
ACROSS DOWN
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brothers inlaw flier
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messengers logo feature
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connected have 5 Pilot's"E"
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t6 Unconvincing or brown
t7Choose deli 7 Volleyball star
platter items? Gabrielle
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Cyprus 10 Baseball's
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23 See 21-Across 11 Bleach
24 Oater camp sight 12 Roots
25 Beef marinated in 13 British : trainer::
Jim's bourbon? American: -
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21 Chrpslerdivision22 CampDaidd
30 Shooting gadget Accords signer:
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33 Dutch physics 25 Upscale imports
Nobelist Simon 26 Source of ticking
van der__ 29 Verbal thumbs-
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spread? 31 Maker oftthe
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against 32 _ Dhabi
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probably 14
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nightclub 17 18
income?
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tliler? 27 28
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the 58-Acrosses 31
all end in
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Acrosses in this
puzzle end in 41 42
types of them
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skeletons in the
closet?: Abbr
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63 Place to keep 60
stook?
64 Grammywinner 43
6 orm
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2010
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and Joyce Nichols Lewis
34 Advertising 44 Take-home
notice 46 Like some
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37 Albania's capital series
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Highway 57 Wire svc.
42 Chip maker involved in many
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Pointe 59 Egg opening
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
D O S E B A T H P A S S E
I N CIA E C H O A L K Y D
G R O G E R O S T B I R D
S U R E A B O U T T H A T
U S E R S E H S T A P
P H D L I A B LIE M I R O
S E I N E M I S E R
I L I K E I T L I K E T H A T
T U L I P A R E T E
C A ILM V O Y A G E B S A
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I R E M E M B E R T H A T
H E M A N N O O K R A V I
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09/2010t

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