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September 17, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-09-17

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R Michael Florek: With the addition of Penn State to Division I hockey, will the CCHA crumble to make room for the Big Ten?>) PAGE 7A
LING UNDER A BIG SHADOW
How a trio of lifetime Ann Arbor boys
made it across Stadium Boulevard.
a SEE FOOTBALL SATURDAY, INSIDE
711 Ahclpan 4:IalIj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, September 17, 2010

BACKPACKING 101

michigandailycom
UNIVERSiTY RESE ARCH
Even after
record year,
U' research
funds grow

Jeannette Stawski, program director for Outdoor Adventures, teaches a Backpacking101 clinic yesterday. In the class, Stawski discussed the benefits of camping includ-
ing leadership skills and better understanding of environmental impact.
UNIVERSITY'S BOARD OF REGENTS
Regents OK Big ouse lights

At meeting, board
also condemns
character attacks in
campus community
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
During its monthly meet-
ing yesterday, the University's
Board of Regents unanimously
approved a proposal to install
permanent field lights at Michi-
gan Stadium.
In the past, temporary light-

ing has been brought in to illu-
minate the Big House for late
afternoon games. With an out-
door hockey
game at the sta- NOTEBOOK
dium slated for
December and a football game to
be played at night next season,
advocates of the project - that
has a $1.8 million budget - said
the lights would be used fairly
regularly.
In an Athletic Department
press release, distributed yes-
terday, Athletic Director David
Brandon said the new lights
will greatly improve fans' and
players' experiences at the Big

House.
"The addition of permanent
lights will improve the qual-
ity of viewing experience for
our fans," Brandon wrote in the
release. "We take great pride in
having the best game day expe-
rience in college football and
this will further enhance that
position."
The permanent lights will
also result in both short-term
and long-term dollar savings,
according to Brandon's state-
ment.
"Short term there will be a
cost savings on the rental fee
associated with bringing in

lights for the Big Chill and long-
term it eliminates the need for
lights to be brought in every
time we play a 3:30 p.m. football
game," Brandon wrote.
The lights are expected to be
installed in time for the Big Chill
at the Big House, which will be
played on Dec. 11, according to
the press release. And the Sept.
10, 2011 football game against
Notre Dame will be the first
home night game in the history
of the Michigan football pro-
gram. The University has previ-
ously played 33 night games at
away or neutral sites.
See REGENTS, Page 6A

Research spending
for fiscal year 2010
increased 12.1
percent over last year
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily NewsEditor
After breaking the billion-dollar
mark in 2009, research spending at
the University continued to climb
over the last year, setting a new
institutional record.
University research spending
rose 12.1 percent last year, increas-
ing from $1.02 billion in fiscal 'year
2009 to $1.14 billion in fiscal year
2010, Stephen Forrest, the Univer-
siky's vice president for research,
announced at yesterday's Board of
Regents meeting. The 2010 fiscal
year ended in June.
And while theincreaseis impres-
sive, Forrest explained that 1.1
percent of the increased research
funding was the result of stimulus
funding, while the remaining 7 per-
cent was from conventional funding
sources.
Funding from federal govern-
ment sources rose 14.7 percent over
the past year. The National Insti-
tutes of Health increased research

funding to the University by about
20 percent and the Department of
Energy increased its funding by 25
percent.
Funding from the Department
of Homeland Security also jumped
dramatically from last year, from
$L6 million in 2009 to $2.5 million
in 2010. Similarly, funding from
the Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion and the Agency for Interna-
tional Development also increased
by more than 50 percent in the past
year,increasing by 57 percent and 78
percent, respectively.
However, the University lost
ground in the research funding it
received from non-federal sources,
which include industry organiza-
tions, non-profits and state and
international governments.
Gifts from public charities rose
by approximately $2.5 million last
year, a 20-percent increase from
2009. And while support from inter-
national organizations rose by 76
percent; from $140,000 in 2009 to
$246,00 in 2010, the increase was
outpaced by a 67-percent loss in
revenue from foreign governments,
which resulted in a $498,000 drop
in research funding.
Overall, research funding from
non-federal sources fell by 4.7 per-
cent between the 2009 and 2010
See FUNDING, Page 6A

MICHIGAN IN WASHINGTON
Morrison: Sen. panel 'owes it' toy
patients to fund stem cell work

Panel votes to
temporarily revoke
injunction that
blocked funding
By LILLIAN XIAO
Daily StaffReporter
Sean Morrison, director of the
University's Center for Stem Cell
Biology, appeared before a Sen-
ate subcommittee in Washington
D.C. yesterday to testify in favor
of continuing federal funding for
e9bryonic stem cell research.

At the hearing, titled "The
Promise of Human Embryonic
Stem Cell Research," the Senate
Appropriations Subcommittee
on Labor, Health and Human
Services, Education and Related
Agencies decided to continue
federal funding for stem cell
research until further legislative
decisions can be made. The sub-
committee ruled to temporarily
revoke the injunction established'
in August by U.S. District Court
Judge Royce Lamberth, which
blocked federal fundingofhuman
embryonic stem cell research.
Lamberth ruled that the
Obama administration's deci-

sion to expand federal funding
in March 2009 was illegal under
the Dickey-Wicker Amendment,
which restricts the use of tax-
payers' dollars to fund research
involving the destruction of
human embryos.
In 2007 President Bush issued
an executive order, which lim-
ited the number of stem cell
lines available to researchers. In
a statement last night, U.S. Sen.
Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) wrote
that Obama's repeal of the ban
brought hope that stem cell
researchers could expand their
work without fear of legal rami-
See MORRISON, Page 6A

ALUMNI IN THE NEWS
Former Apollo 15 astronaut discusses

Patrons enjoy the atmosphere of Studio 4 in March 2008. The club, which is now facing a lawsuit, suddenly closed in June
With lawsuit pending, future
of hot spot Studio 4is unclear

importance of math at campus event
'U' alum Alfred man of the Astronaut Scholarship career areas.
Foundation, retired astronaut and The foundation - a non-pr.
Worden awards University alum, as he awarded established in 1984 - has awar
LSA senior David Montague a $3 million in scholarship mor
LSA senior $10,000 $10,000 scholarship yesterday. to date. Since 2007, $40,000

ofit
ded
iney
of

scholarship
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
"You cannot get to the moon
unless you do your math."
So said Alfred Worden, chair-

Montague, a mathematics
major with a 4.0 GPA, was chosen
partially because of his research
in prime number theory. As Wor-
den presented the award in East
Hall, he emphasized the impor-
tance of mathematics as the
underlying basis for everything
in the space program and in other

this total has been awarded to the
University.
The ASF aims to maintain the
United States's strong position as
a leader in science and technol-
ogy by encouraging students with
a strong interest in the field. The
scholarship, which was awarded
See ASTRONAUT, Page 3A

Club known for
Thursday night
scene closed doors
suddenly in June
By BRIENNE PRUSAK
Daily StaffReporter
For some students, Thursday
nights in Ann Arbor may now be
changed forever.
Local nightclub Studio 4 -
located at 314 South Fourth Ave.

- abruptly closed on June 3, and
the once solid black front has now
been painted orange, with no clear
physical signs to indicate what
may become of the space.
City attorney Kristen Larcom,
who's managing the case, said
the closure comes in connection
with a pending public nuisance
lawsuit filed against Papa Chulo's,
the company that subleases the
address, in addition to the club's
operator, Vickash Mangray of
V.R. Entertainment Network, Inc.,
and Dennis Serras, the property
owner. The lawsuit was finalized

on Feb. 19, 2010.
According to a June 21 AnnAr-
bor.com article, a fight occurred
at Studio 4 the day before the club
closed. Three people, including
one in possession of a handgun,
were arrested on June 2, the arti-
cle states.
According to the lawsuit, which
was provided to The Michigan
Daily by Larcom, there have been
more than 200 logged calls to the
Ann Arbor Police Department
regarding Studio 4 since Septem-
ber 2007. The majority of these
See STUDIO 4, Page 6A

WEATHER HI: 73
TOMORROW LO: 53

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INDEX NEWS.................................2A SPORTS.. . . .A.........7A
Vol CXXI, No. 9 O PIN IlO N -........................... 4 A A R T S ..................,............ .. 8 A
'0201The Michigan Daily CLASSIFIEDS...................... 6A FOOTBALL SATURDAY..........11
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