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January 14, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-01-14

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ANIMANIACS
An exploration of the role
anime culture plays in A2.
SEE THE B-SIDE, INSIDE

(1ieC ff1iI a aImj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, January 14,2010

michigandaily.com

ONE PERSON'S TRASH IS ANOTHER'S ART

PROVOST PICKED AS PRESIDENT
Sullivan
'surprised'
by UVA
pres. offer

MARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily
Art & Design freshman Paris Glickman peruses the shelves at The Scrap Box for recycled materials for an art project yesterday. The Scrap Box sells materials that local
businesses would have otherwise discarded. "The old junk is sometimes more interesting than new stuff because it has more character and personality," Glickman said.
THE 2010 GOVERNORS RACE
Source: Regent litch could
enter gubernatorial race

'U' provost said she
wasn't interested in
the job to start
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily News Editor
It was a surprising announce-
ment to many on campus when
University Provost Teresa Sullivan
was named the University of Vir-
ginia's next president on Monday,
one that even Sullivan said she was
surprised by.
":t's a little surprising to me
too," Sullivan said.
In an interview with The Michi-
gan Daily yesterday, Sullivan out-
lined the circumstances thatled up
to her being chosen as the Univer-
sity of Virginia's eighth president,
what she needs to finish before
leaving Ann Arbor and the tasks
she will face when she arrives in
Charlottesville.,
Sullivan is set to take the helm
at the University of Virginia on
August 1, something she said she's
excited for. But despite the excite-
ment that was obvious in her voice,
Sullivan said this wasn't a job she
originally sought out or was overly
interested in.
Sullivan said she was first con-

tacted by an executive search firm,
something she said wasn't out of
the ordinary.
"To tell you the truth, whoever
is the provost at the University of
Michigan gets contacted by head-
hunters three or four times a
week," she said. "It's just because
of the product of Michigan. It
actually doesn't matter who the
provost is."
Because the occurrence is so
common for Sullivan, she said she
didn't have any particular interest
when she was first contacted.
"A headhunter contacted me
for the first time in the middle
of 'August," she said. "I basically
didn't respond."
Sullivan said her initial apathy
about the job was driven, in part,
by the fact that she didn't know
whether the search firm was actu-
ally interested in her or just con-
tacting her because of her position
at the University of Michigan.
Once the search firm continued
to contact her, Sullivan said she
decided to talk with them about
the position.
"They kept coming back to me
over and over again," she said.
"Finally, somewhere toward the
end of October, they said 'Well
look, you don't have to apply. You
See SULLIVAN, Page SA

Dems looking for
frontrunner after
Lt. Gov. left field
By ELYANA TWIGGS
Daily StaffReporter
A source close to University
Regent Denise Ilitch (D-Bingham
Farms) with knowledge of the

situation told The Michigan Daily
in an interview yesterday that
though she hasn't made up her
mind yet, Ilitch is considering a
run for governor.
With the announcement last
week that Lt. Gov. John Cherry
will not be entering the 2010 race
for Michigan governor, many
are speculating as to who the
Democratic front-runner for the
position will be - and one of the

University's own may be stepping
in to fill the void.
According to the source,
Regent Ilitch, who has served on
the University's Board of Regents
since 2008, has not yet formed an
exploratory committee --the first
formal step toward candidacy.
The source said that though
Ilitch is unsure whether she'll
pursue the candidacy, Ilitch is
"very humbled" by the many peo-

ple reaching out and encouraging.
her to run.
Those supporting a possible
run by Ilitch say the state of Mich-
igan is in dire need of a fresh per-
spective, the source said. Because
Ilitch is not from Lansing, many
believe she would appeal to vot-
ers.
Ilitch's supporters believe that
her past and present business
See ILITCH, Page SA

FORMING A GREEK GUILD
New council to
unite campus
prof. fraternities

HEELS OVER HEAD

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
'U' study finds lack of
diversity in stem cells

Eight professional
fraternities work
on new group to
combine resources
By VERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
Students interested in get-
ting involved in Greek life will
now have one more council to
choose from.
Eight business, law and other
professional fraternities are
uniting to form the Professional
Fraternity Council in an effort
to collaborate on a more regular
basis.
The councils that represent
social fraternities and sororities
on campus currently act as gov-
erning bodies above the individ-
uals houses. But officials from
professional fraternities said
it's unclear if the new council
would fulfill a similar oversight
role or whether the body would
simply be an organization to
unite the groups.
The idea of forming the coun-
cil has been floating around
since December 2008 when
a few professional fraternity

members contacted each other
and suggestedthey work togeth-
er on a more regular basis, said
Samantha Greenberg, an LSA
junior and the rush advisor for
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity.
"At that point we were really
decentralized and only met
together for one week a year,"
she said. "Why not just continue
it?"
Danielle Wong, an LSA senior
and former secretary of Phi Chi
Theta, a business and econom-
ics fraternity, said all the profes-
sional fraternity members had
always thought a council was a
good idea because the fraterni-
ties have had limited interaction
with one another in the past.
"We thought a council will
give every fraternity an equal
say," she said. "It's the next step
in helping all the fraternities
grow and it allows all members
to unite under one roof"
Business senior and for-
mer president of Phi Chi Theta
Cory Rosenfield, who has been
heading up the effort to cre-
ate the council, said forming
the organization will indicate
the importance of professional
fraternities to the campus com-
See COUNCIL, Page 5A

Research finds most
stem cells used for
research are of
European origin
By LILLIAN XIAO
Daily StaffReporter
The much-heralded potential
benefits of stem cell research
could be limited to certain ethnic
groups, according to a recent Uni-
versity study.
In a recent University study
of 47 commonly used stem cell
lines, most were found to be of
European origin, with only two of
East Asian origin, a few of Middle
Eastern origin and none of recent
African origin.
Several hundred embryonic
stein cell lines exist worldwide,
but only a small group of those
are readily available to research-
ers and are widely disseminat-
ed to the research community,
said Jack Mosher, an assistant
research scientist at the Univer-
sity's Life Sciences Institute.
Mosher, who worked on the
study, said it's important to study
stem cells from different origins
because genetic background
leaves individuals more suscepti-
ble to certain diseases. He added
that it is important to evalu-
ate how cells of distinct origins

respond to medications as well.
Associate Prof. of Human
Genetics Noah Rosenberg worked
alongside Mosher on the study.
Rosenberg said the lack of diver-
sity they found in the lines could
result in some groups benefiting
more than others from stem cell
research.
"There's the potential that the
work currently being done will
lead to benefits only for subsets
of the human population," Rosen-
berg said.
Mosher said their research
began in 2008, when voters in
Michigan passed a ballot initia-
tive that allows researchers to
derive stem cell lines from donat-
ed embryos.
"As far as we know, there
wasn't much diversity in the exist-
ing lines," Mosher said. "Many of
the lines originate from a specific
clinic, but no one had really test-
ed what the diversity of the lines
'actually was."
The embryos from which stem
cells lines are derived are mostly
discarded from fertility clin-
ics, according to Sean Morrison,
director of the Center for Stem
Cell Biology at the Life Sciences
Institute, who also worked on the
study. He said a big reason for the
disparity in ancestral roots is the
disproportionate number of cli-
ents of European descent who use
fertility clinic services.
See STEM CELLS, Page SA

TOREHAs SHARMAN/Daiy
Members of Element 1, the hip-hop freestyling group, practice neot to thesposting mall
in Angell Hall yesterday. The group regularly practices on Mondays and Wednesdays
offering workshops for new members and anyone who is interested. They are involved
in competitions and charity events throughout the year.

WEATHER HI:36
TOMORROW LO 27

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