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March 23, 2010 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-03-23

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2 - Tuesday, March 23, 2010

MONDAY: TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers Professor Profiles Before You Were Here
A forum for dialogue

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week

Afroamerican and African
Studies lecturer Scott Ells-
worth said he started teach-
ing at the University three
years ago as a way to thank
the University of Michigan
Health System for detecting
and curing his prostate can-
cer.
"I teach here because of
cancer," Ellsworth said. "The
University of Michigan Hos-
pital saved my life."
Ellsworth's courses range
in topic from Southern lit-
erature to African-American
history to crime and justice
in the United States, and he
said he tries to promote lively
discussion in the classroom.
He is currently working on a
novel about race and basket-
ball, set in the 1940s.
"I try to -get a cross-racial
dialogue going because in

America we tend to talk
about race with people who
look like us," Ellsworth said.
"I try to have honest con-
versation in a diverse class-
room."
Originally from Tulsa,
Okla., Ellsworth said watch-
ing the civil rights movement
unfold sparked his interest in
race relations.
"In American society,
race is both the source of
our greatest failings but also
of some of our greatest art,"
Ellsworth said.
And though Ellsworth
said he has seen much of the
civil rights movement first-
hand, he said he likes to keep
his classroom environment
informal so that he can learn
as much from his students as
they learn from him.
"I'm really still a rookie

teacher," Ellsworth said.
"The students and I are
exploring a lot of this stuff
together."
He added that he hopes to
keep teaching at the Univer-
sity so that he can continue
to work with engaged stu-
dents and colleagues.
"The students here are
all so sophisticated," Ells-
worth said. "I am so deeply
impressed with them."
While Ellsworth enjoys
his time teaching, when he's
not in the classroom, he can
usually be found cooking for
his wife Betsy and his twin
sons. Ellsworth - who was
a stay-at-home dad - said he
estimates he changed about
"10 million diapers" during
his five years at home with
his sons.
- LIZZYALFS

ANNA SCHULTE/Daily
Lecturer Scott Ellsworth says that overcoming prostate cancer, being a stay-at-
home dad to twin boys and meeting his wife Betsy have all made him the man
and professor he is today.

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The Michigan Saily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
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CRIME NOTES
Stolen gym bag Wallet and

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Social skills 8-ball billiards
building tournament

WHERE: Central Campus
Recreation Building
WHEN:Sundayatabout6p.m.
WHAT: A man reported that
his green gym bag and its con-
tents were stolen from the main
gym, University police report-
ed. The bag was left unattended
for between 6 and 6:10 p.m.
There are no suspects.
Repeat trespass
WHERE: Michigan Union
WHEN: Saturday at about 1
p.m.
WHAT: A caller reported that
a man who had trespassed in
the Union before was in the
building again, on the 4th floor
couches, University Police
reported. The 50-year-old male
was escorted from the building.

laptop stolen
WHERE: Hatcher Graduate
Library
WHEN:Saturday at about 4 p.m.
WHAT: A caller reported her
wallet and laptop were sto-
len from a study carrel in the
Grad. library, University Police
reported. She had left her item
unattended between 3:50 p.m.
and 3:52 p.m.

workshop
WHAT: Workshop sessions
aimed at helping students
establish stronger
relationships.
WHO: Counseling and
Psychological Services
WHEN: Today 1:15 p.m.
WHERE: Room
3100, CAPS office

Canoe graffiti Discussion

WHAT: A billiards 8-ball
tournament, featurimg
teams with six students
each. Registration is free.
WHO: Michigan Union
Billiards
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Billiards
Room, Michigan Union
Talk on same
sex marriage
WHAT: A discussion on
the role of religion in-the
same-sex marriage debate.
WHO: UM Center foir
Ethics in Public Life
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Weill Hall
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

According to msnbc.com,
researchers are able to
understand the personality
of an octopus by display-
ing images of other animals on
an HDTV screen and observe
its reaction. Scientists say this
is the first successful attempt
to imitate real animals with
an octopus because with other
images the animals knew the
picture was not real.
The Michigan Economic
Development Corpora-
tion awarded $9.1 million
in tax breaks to a convict-
ed felon.
>> FOR MORE, SEEOPINION, PAGE 4
According to ABC News,
a North Carolina woman
won $9 million in damages
from her husband's mistress for
breaking up her 33-year mar-
riage. The women sued under
old case law for "alienation of
affection" because the women
knew he was married.

WHERE: Elbel Field
WHEN: Friday at about 2 p.m.
WHAT: A caller reported that
canoes were damaged with red
paint on the night of March
17, University Police reported.
The words "Lou Lou" were
written on the canoes.

on working
with youth
WHAT: A talk geared
toward teaching students
the skills necessary to work
with "at-risk" youth.
WHO: The Ginsberg Center
WHEN: Tonight from
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
WHERE: Room 4448, East
Hall

MORE ONLINE
LoveCrime Notes? Get more online at michigandaily.com/blogs/the wire

FAN THE DAILY ON FACEBOOK

GOP makes final
stand on health care

hoosing the right career requires equal parts
knowledge, insight, and planning.
If you are weighing your career options, consider
this: US. News & World Report places pharmacy on
its 2009 short list of Best Careers
--and ranks the University of
Michigan College of Pharmacy
.1 J one of the best in the nation.

(AP) - In a defiant last stand
against a newly passed health care
overhaul, opponents are trying
everything they can to stop it from
becoming the law of the land.
Republicans in the Senate are
planning parliamentary maneu-
vers to keep a companion bill from
reaching the president's desk. And
lawmakers in at least 30 states are
working to prevent what they say is
an unconstitutional mandate forcing
Americans tohave health insurance.
Experts say none of it is likely
to work, but it will keep the issue,
and the outrage, alive until Election

Day.
"I am surprised by the mobiliza-
tionofthe states. It does strike me as
a kind of civil disobedience, a dec-
laration that we're not going to fol-
-low the law of the land," said Mark
Hall, a professor of law and public
health at Wake Forest University.
"It doesn't make sense. The federal
Constitution couldn't be any clear-
er that federal law is supreme," Hall
added.
The House passed the plan late
Sunday, sparking a variety of pro-
tests and threats less than a day
later.

yuU U lear ntrea ouuut ate taty excttng car eer
opportunities pharmacy can offer you. .
Join us at:
Career Options for Michigan PharmD Graduates:
Wednesday, March 24, 2010; 6-8 p.m.; Room 1544,
C.C. Little Building.

"PROMINENCE TO PRISON:
WHY SMART PEOPLE DO
DUMB THINGS"
Guest Speaker: Patrick Kuhse
Patrick will share his journey from prominence as
a successful stock broker to his involvement in a
financial fraud scheme, life as an international
fugitive, and his subsequent incarcerations.
Tuesday, March 23, 2010
4:30 p.m.
Blau Auditorium
Ross School of Business
FREE
Sponsored by the Ross Community Values Committee,
Ross BBA Council and The Office of Student Life
MICHIGA NM
ROSS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

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