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March 22, 2010 - Image 7

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0 The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Monday, March 22, 2010 - 7A

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Monday, March 22, 2010 - 7A

KARTJE
From Page 1A
the opposite net, an imposing nine
inches taller than Hunwick.
So as time ticked away as slowly as
it had-all season with the Wolverines
leading2-1,I started to believe.
Istarted to forget the season
sweep at the hands of Miami, the
.500 record 20 games into the season,
the three losses to Michigan State.
And more than anything, I started to
realize that Shawn Hunwick was a
starting goalie.
A starting goalie who had just
led the most frustrating Michigan
team in the Berenson era to a confer-
ence championship when everyone,
MARGOLIS
From Page 1A
experience necessary to make these
changes a reality, adding that he was
part of a group of MVP representa-
tives that "spear-headed" important
events inthe past fewyears.
Margolis cited events organized
by MVP leaders like the formation
of the "Block M" during Michigan
football games, promoting Go Blue,
Beat OSU Week, providing coffee
and bagels to students on the Diag
as part of MSA Mondays and hosting
the upcoming "AA Chillin" spring
concert featuring artists Wale,
Clipse and Big Sean.
As part of his campaign goals,
Margolis said that he wants to bring
more events to campus, like those
he's worked on in the past, in order
to make the students' time at the
University more memorable.
"Every day and every night we
need to be working on improving the
STENVIG
From Page 1A
According to Stenvig, the increase
in students seeking help from Coun-
seling and-Psychological Services at
the University is a testament to the
pressure and stress students are feel-
ingfromthecampusenvironment.
"The drop in minority enrollment
means that there is an increase in
racism and sexual assault and gen-
eral expressions of sexism," she said.
According to a petition drafted by
DAAP and the Coalition to Defend
Affirmative Action by Any Means
Necessary - known as BAMN - to
reverse the drop in minority student
enrollment at the University, from
2005 to 2009 the number of black
students in the freshmen classes fell
from 443 to 290. In the same time,
period the number of Latino stu-

including myself, said it wouldnever
happen.
Three and a half seconds
remained on the clock Saturday and
the Wolverinesstill led. The faceoff
was at the other end. It was over.
So Hunwick, with the weight of
college hockey's most illustrious
program on his narrow shoulders,
kickedback.
Arms laid atop the crossbar, Hun-
wick watched as his team won the
CCHA Championship in the most
improbable way. But he was used to
improbable at this point.
Hunwick could only watch as his
incredible story reached its climax.
"I got pretty emotional," Hunwick
said after the game. "I saw everyone
hanging over the boards, Iknew they

were coming to get me. I was just try-
ing to keep it together."
But the walk-on was used to keep-
ing it all together - he'd been keeping
Michigan together for weeks now.
And as he received honors as
CCHA Tournament MVP, he was the
only doubter left in the building.
"I don't even know if I deserve
to be MVP," Hunwick said. "I don't
even know if I deserve tobe the
starter of the game ... Six weeks ago
if you would have said I'd be sitting
here, I would have said you were
crazy."
And so wouldI. But as the Wol-
verines roll into their NCAA first
round matchup against Bemidji
State next weekend, they come inas
the hottest team in the nation. With

Hunwick, the walk-on warrior, the
nation's hottest goalie.
It's a story that seems too far-
fetched to believe. But there's no
ignoring it anymore. None of us
saw Shawn Hunwick, but he was
there all along. Just waiting for his
shot.

"I don't think any of us thought
he could do it night after night,"
Berenson said. "But good for him.
You never know. That's one thing
I've learned as a coach, you never
know about a player, you never know
what's inside him, until he really gets
a chance."

Now, a walk-on, who should've
never been there, whose teammates
were maybe the only ones who
believed in him, is Michigan's best
shot at a national championship.
- Kartje can be reached
at rkartje@umich.edu.

-------------- - - - ------------------

student experience," he said.
Margolis also said MSA needs to
be more "responsive" to students
after student government elections
end. To do this, he plans to offer more
"deliverables," which he said are stu-
dent resources, like Airbus and fund-
ing for student organizations.
"I want to oversee an assembly
that focuses on these deliverables to
students," Margolis said. "We need
to have tangible things so that stu-
dents that aren't familiar with MSA
know what they are getting back
from it."
Margolis also plans to start
"Vision projects," which he
describes as times when represen-
tatives would walk around campus
and ask students what they want
from MSA and what they think
could be changed.
"We need to continue seeing what
students' visions are and creating
resultsto go along with what they tell
us they want to see us doing," he said.
Margolis said though the cur-

rent executive board of MSA has
made internal improvements, he
and Stuckeyare stressing the impor-
tance of external reform in their
campaign.
Margolis added that he is excited
for proposed student constitution
changes, including the Students 4
Progressive Governance proposal,
which includes new regulations
like the ability to impeach an MSA
president. Margolis said, if elected,
he would like to oversee the imple-
mentation of the proposed constitu-
tion.
"We need to make a separation of
powers to make MSA more effective
for the students," Margolis said.
Margolis said the relationship
between University students and
the administration could also be
improved and his work on the Cam-
pus Governance Committee has
taught him the importance of stu-
dents having an "active voice" when
it comes to communicating with the
administration.

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For Tuesday, March 23, 2010
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You're in the mood to overhaul things
at home and make changes forshe bete.
In particular, these changes likely will
involve getting rid of what you don't
need. "Take the garbage out!"
TAURUS
(April 20 toMay 20)
Discussions with others, particularly
relatives and siblings, might get heated
today. Your knee-jerk reaction is to per-
suade others to agree with you. Is this
really necessary?
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You feel very strongly about financial
matters today. This could pertain to how
to earn money, or you might be just as
obsessed about buying something.
(Lighten up.)
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
You might be more emotional than
usual because the Moon is in your sign
today. Furthermore, it opposes big daddy
Pluto. Guard against jealousy today!
LOops.)
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Your peace of mind might be vaguely
disturbed today because something
behind the scenes is bothering you. It's
as if you're worried about something,
but you're not sure what. This will pass
very quickly.
VIRGO
(Aug. 2310o Sept. 22)
Heated exchanges with others, espe-
cially friends or people in groups, might
arise today. People are inclined to be
pushy with their opinions. (Just watch
from the sidelines.)
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Avoid disputes with parents, bosses
and authority figures today. They could

quickly turn nasty. Feelings of envy and
jealousy are running strong.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Arguments about politics, religion and
racial issues, or something having In do
with publishing and travel, might arise
today. It's far better to steer clear of all
this! Stay mellow.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
This is a poor day to discuss inheri-
lances, how In share something or how
to approach a problem with taxes and
death. People are too stuck in their
views.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Jealousy with a partner or close friend
might make relationships a bit sticky
today. You could be doing a slow burn
about something. Try to relax.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Speak up about your ideas to introduce
reforms or to improve where you work.
You also might have ideas about how to
improve your own health!
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Participants in sports will be competi-
tive today. No question! Romantic part-
ners will be jealous of one another. No
question! Don't give in to these dark
feelings.
YOU BORN TODAY You like to
study people; in part this is because you
want answers to the big questions in life.
You ab shoulders aeit eallwalks of life,
and you wantlto make sense of itall. You
are fond of children, and you're also a
bit of a risk-taker. Your year ahead will
focus on partnerships and close friend-
ships. New relationships might begin!
Birthdate of: Dane Rudhyar, philoso-
pher/astrologer; Roger Bannister, neu-
rologist/runner; Julie Holmes, figure-
skating champ.

dents decreased from 312 to 224 and
Native American students fell from
57 to 21.
The petition also states that the
University's Law School minority
enrollment dropped 31 percent from
2005 to 2009.
A leading member of BAMN,
Stenvig said MSA should lobby to
restore affirmative action.
"There are more students who
really want to fight to defend their
right tobe here and defend the acces-
sibility of the University," she said,
adding that MSA can "play a historic
role in defending education."
Stenvig said MSA representatives
must play a "central role" in defend-
ing public education and the rights
of women and minority students.
"We need a leadership on our stu-
dent government that is being really
bold and fighting to mobilize the sen-
timent of the majority of the campus

in defense of integration and defense
of affordable education for every stu-
dentin Michigan," Stenvigsaid.
Stenvig added that, if elected,
she plans to have a more open dis-
course to encourage greater student
involvement within MSA to counter
the "bureaucratic" and "elite" envi-
ronment surrounding MSA.
To increase discourse, Sten-
vig said she wants to extend the
time allotted to community speak-
ers during MSA's weekly meet-
ings. Currently, speakers are given
three minutes and must show their
MCards to speak.
Stenvig said she sees a promising
future for MSA, but that right now,
the student government is only add-
ing to the University's problems.
"MSA has got to be part of the
solution in solving the issue of cam-
pus climate," she said. "And right
now, they are the problem."

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