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March 17, 2010 - Image 2

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2A - Wednesday, March 17, 2010

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:

MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

TUESDAY:
Professor Profiles

THURSDAY: FRIDAY
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week
RONING TTP ON SAFE SEX.Y

St. Patrick's Day of yore

Many students will cele-
brate St. Patrick's Day today
by dressing in green, drink-
ing green beer and opting
to go to the bar instead of
to lecture. But the celebra-
tion of St. Patrick's Day in
Ann Arbor has been a tradi-
tion that started long before
current students were even
born.
Green beer was already
a St. Patrick's Day favor-
ite in 1950, according to a
March 18, 1950 article in
The Michigan Daily, with
students and Ann Arbor
residents crowdingthe local
bars, drinking to honor the
famous St. Patrick.
But in 60 years since, at
least one thing has changed:
whereas the bars used to
open between noon and 3
p.m. on St. Patrick's Day and

close promptly at midnight,
they have since adjusted
their hours and are open
early in the morning to well
past the stroke of midnight.
The celebrations have
continued over the years
and by 1980, there were
over 3,000 people of Irish
descent living in Ann Arbor,
according to a census at the
time. Two Ann Arbor locals
who spoke to the Daily at
the time discussed the dif-
ferences between the sym-
bolic meaning of the holiday
and how it's celebrated,
according to a March 17,
1985 article in Daily.
"In Ireland it's a holy day
- you go to Mass...It's fes-
tive the entire week, not just
one day like it is here," Tony
Paxton, an Irish immigrant
who lived in Ann Arbor in

1985 told the Daily at the
time.
Jack Foley, a store owner
in Ann Arbor at the time,
told the Daily that a big part
of the holiday is the festivi-
ties that go with it.
"It's the parties. It's just a
joyful time to celebrate. It's
an excuse for a party," Foley
said to the Daily.
In 1980, bars that now
cease to exist took part in
the day's celebratory events,
and much of the green beer
that was served left a linger-
ing color on students' teeth.
Even the University got
swept up in the spirit of the
day as the University Club
hosted Gaelic dancers and
served Irish whiskey, cof-
fee and corned beef sand-
wiches.
- LINDSAYKRAMER

University alum Michael Balkin and Business sophomore Andrew Eisbrouch, co-
founders of Educating Students About Safe Sex, set up an information table on the
diag on yesterday.

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms bystudentsat theuniversity of Michigan.One copyis available freeofchargeto all
readers.Additional copiesmaybepickedupattheDailystoffiefor$2.Subscriptionsforfaliterm,
starting in September, viaU.S.mail are $110. Winter termJanuarythrough April)is$115, yearlong
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CRIME NOTES

Trespassing in
hospital
WHERE: 1300 Catherine St.
WHEN: Monday at about 4 p.m.
WHAT: A former female
employee was found trespass-
ing at the University hospital,
University police reported.
The woman had not been an
employee at the hospital for
several months.
Cars crash in lot
WHERE: 1211 Kipke
WHEN: Monday at about 4:50
p.m.
WHAT: Two vehicles col-
lided when one vehicle that
was backing up crashed into
another vehicle in the parking
lot, University police reported.
There were no injuries.

Pot found in
residence hall
WHERE:South Quad
WHEN: Monday at about11:30
p.m.
WHAT: A female student was
found with marijuana, Univer-
sity police reported.
Man crashes
meeting
WHERE: Student Activities
Building
WHEN: Monday at about10:40
a.m.
WHAT: A 39-year-old male
was found trespassingin the
building and was tryingto
attend a student orientation
meeting, University police
reported. The man was arrest-
ed and later released pending a
warrant.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Concentration Public Policy
Week fair work showcase

WHAT: As part of Concen-
tration Week, an event that
will feature advisors from
different LSA departments
in addition to other schools.
WHO: Newnan Advis-
ing Center
WHEN: Today from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
WHERE: Union Ballroom
Jazz Orchestra
and Wynton
Marsalis
WHAT: The Jazz at Lin-
coln Center orchestra
with Wynton Marsalis
will perform. Tickets are
$10-$54 dollars and stu-
dent tickets are available.
WHO: UMS
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Hill Auditorium

WHAT:'The Gramlich
Showcase Showcase of
Student Work will feature
Public Policy students' work.
WHO: Public Policy
WHEN: Today from
4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
WHERE: Weill Hall,
first and second floors
CORRECTIONS
. A Feb. 24,2010 article
inthe Dailytitled "MSA
boosts fundingfor student
orgs this semester" incor-
rectlystated the amount
of money requested from
and allocated to student
organizationsby MSA
this semester. $260,000
was requested, and
$100,000 was allocated.
* Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Research has shown that
wearing Ugg boots may
lead to ankle, knee, hip
and back problems, because
the shoes don't provide
enough support, Telegraph.
co.uk reported. It is believed
that these problems are espe-
cially prevalent in teenage
girls, whose bones are still
developing.
In 2005, Ann Arbor
Mayor John Hieftje chal-
lenged the city to derive
30 percent of its energy from
renewable sources by the end
of 2010. So far, that number is
only at 16, but the mayor still
thinks the goal will be reached.
FOR MORE, SEE THE STATEMENT
Men who have erec-
tile dysfunction may be
twice as likely to die from
heart disease, abcnews.go.com
reported.

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MORE ONLINE
Love Crime Notes? Get moreonline at michigandaily.com/blogs/the wire

FBI: No evidence Mexico
F F^F hit men targeted Americans

Q Enter Class of 2010 T-Shirt Design Contest
and Win $250 Cash!

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Hit men thought
to be involved with
Juarez drug cartel
CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico
(AP) - Confused hit men may have
gone to the wrong party, the FBI
said yesterday as it cast doubt on
fears that the slaying of three peo-
ple with ties to the U.S. consulate
shows that Mexican drug cartels
have launched an offensive against
U.S. government employees.
Gunmen chased two white
SUVs from the birthday party of a
consulate employee's child on Sat-
urday and opened fire as horrified
relatives screamed. The two near-
simultaneous attacks left three
adults dead and at least two chil-
dren wounded.
The attack drives home just
how dangerous Ciudad Juarez has
become - and just how vulnerable
those who live and work there can
be, despite the Mexican govern-
ment's claims that most victims
are drug smugglers.

According to one of several
lines of investigation, the assail-
ants - believed to be aligned with
the Juarez drugcartel - may have
been ordered to attack a white
SUV leaving a party and mis-
takenly went to the "Barquito de
Papel," which puts on children's
parties and whose name means
"Paper Boat."
"We .don't have any informa-
tion that these folks were directly
targeted because of their employ-
ment by the U.S. government or
their U.S. citizenship,"FBI spokes-
woman Andrea Simmons told The
Associated Press by phone from El
Paso, just across the Rio Grande
from Ciudad Juarez.
The FBI is still investigatingthe
backgrounds of the victims.
Experts cast doubt on the idea.
that drug cartels would be inter-
ested in turningtheir guns on U.S.
government employees.
"A systematic, nationwide shift
to the use of such tactics would
work against drug traffickers'
interests," said Allyson Benton, an
analystwith the Eurasia Group. "It

would dramatically raise the level
of both Mexican and U.S. govern-
mental involvement in the fight
against organized crime."
The wife of one of the victims, a
13-year employee of the consulate
named Hilda, described to a friend
how she watched in horror as hit
men pumped bullets into her SUV
with her husband and children
inside. She had been trailing her
family in a second car when the
attack occurred.
She leapt screaming from her
car, begging the men to stop and
telling them her children - ages
2, 4 and 7 - were inside, the
friend said. But they continued
until her husband, Jorge Alberto
Salcido, was covered in blood,
slumped dead behind the steer-
ing wheel.
All three children in the car
were treated for injuries and
released - the older children
grazed by bullets and the youngest
hit by shards of glass, the friend
said. His account differed from
authorities who said two children
were in the car.

Holder: bin Laden won't be captured alive

The Alumni Association is sponsoring a T-shirt design competition to
celebrate the Class of 2010. Picture your design on the backs of your
classmates!
The T-shirts will be for sale in April and May on our Web site, with
all proceeds benefiting student programs like Welcome Wednesdays,
30-Minute Mentors and free memberships for new graduates.
Deadline: Monday, March 22.
Prizes: Winning design: $250 cash 2nd place: $150 cash
and your design produced 3rd place: $75 cash
by the Alumni Association
Complete rules and entry details at umalumni.com/classof2010tshirt.

Attorney General
says bin Laden will
never face trial in
the U.S.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Attor-
ney General Eric Holder told
Congress yesterday that Osama
bin Laden will never face trial in
the United States because he will
not be captured alive.
In testy exchanges with House
Republicans, the attorney general
compared bin Laden to mass mur-
derer Charles Manson and pre-
dicted that events would ensure
"we will be reading Miranda
rights to the corpse of Osama bin
Laden" not to the al-Qaida leader
as a captive.
Holder sternly rejected criti-
cism from GOP members of a
House Appropriations subcom-
mittee, who contend it is too dan-
gerous to put terror suspects on
trial in federal civilian courts as
Holder has proposed.

The attorney general said it
infuriates him to hear conserva-
tive critics complain that terror-
ists would get too many rights in
the court system.
Terrorists in court "have the
same rights that Charles Man-
son would have, any other kind
of mass murderer," the attorney
general said. "It doesn't mean
that they're going to be coddled,
it doesn't mean that they're going
to be treated with kid gloves."
The comparison to convicted
killer Manson angered Rep. John
Culberson, R-Texas, who said
it showed the Obama adminis-
tration doesn't understand the
American public's desire to treat
terrorists as wartime enemies,
not criminal defendants.
"My constituents and I just
have a deep-seated and profound
philosophical difference with the
Obama administration," Culber-
son said.
Holder, his voice rising,
charged that Culberson's argu-
ments ignored basic facts about
the law and the fight against ter-

rorists.
"Let's deal with reality," Hold-
er said. Bin Laden "will 'never
appear in an American court-
room."
Pressed further on that point,
Holder said: "The possibility of
catching him alive is infinitesi-
mal. He will be killed by us or he
will be killed by his own people
so he can't be captured by us."
Much of the hearing centered
around the Obama administra-
tion's stalled plan to put the
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the
professed mastermind of the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on trial.
Last year, Holder announced
the trial would take place in fed-
eral civilian court in New York
City, not far from the site of the
destroyed World Trade Center.
In the face of resistance from
New York Mayor Michael Bloom-
berg and other local politicians,
that plan was shelved and the
White House is now considering
putting KSM and four alleged co-
conspirators into a military com-
mission trial.

facebook.com/AAUMstudents

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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