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March 15, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-03-15

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S 0PINION FROM THE DAILY: By mismanaging funds for a new website, MSA's president and other representatives have betrayed students' trust in the assembly. PAGE 4A
Between the basketball team's season ending and hockey's sweep of
Michigan State, two frontpages in this week's SportsMonday, inside.

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, March 15, 2010

michigandaily.com

RETOOLING MICHIGAN'S ECONOMY
In Granholm
plan, limited
help for small
businesses

SALAM RIDO/Daily
Engineering senior Urvashi Sharma (right) paints a henna tattoo on Engineering graduate student Davina Widjaja at the second annual Malaysian Cultural Night at
Angell Hall on Saturday. The event was hosted by the Malaysian Student Association and featured henna, or Indian body art, among other activities.
UNDER REPR ESENT ED MINORIT IES AT T HE ',
'U'officia s, students discuss
It minority enrollment at event

Business leaders,
experts say more
help is still needed to
transform economy
By CHRISTOPHERPHOTIADES
For the Daily
Democratic Gov. Jennifer Gra-
nholm unveiled new plans last
month to stimulate Michigan's
economy by providing financial
assistance to small business own-
ers - and local business owners
and experts say they think her
plans will be beneficial, but more
assistance is still needed.
One of Granholm's new pro-
grams is the Michigan Small
Business Financing Alliance, a
consortium of 30 credit unions
that have agreed to make $43 mil-
lion in capital available to small
businesses. In addition to the
Financing Alliance, Granholm also
announced that the state would
provide funding for the FastTrac
program, which offers aspiring
entrepreneurs the opportunity to
learn how to start their own busi-
nesses.
The Financing Alliance intends
to help current small business

owners and aspiring entrepre-
neurs by giving out loans that aver-
age about $20,000.
State Sen. Liz Brater (D-Ann
Arbor) said in an interview last
month that she thinks the Financ-
ing Alliance will bringsome much-
needed help to small businesses in
Washtenaw County during a tough
economic time.
"I think at this point in time it is
a very important proposal," Brater
said.
Tom Porter, adjunct lecturer
of Entrepreneurial Studies in the
Ross School of Business, also said
he believes the program will be
beneficial for businesses because
many small businesses are having
trouble obtaining credit in the cur-
rent financial crisis.
"Throughout the country in
the last couple of years, allbusi-
nesses have found it difficult to
obtain credit," Porter said. "(This
program) seems like a program
designed to help smaller business-
es get the kind of credit that they
probably used to get from their
banks."
Brater said she has heard from
many small business owners in her
district who are having problems
obtaining loans.
"(Small business owners) have
See BUSINESS, Page 3A

Students voice
concern over impact
of statewide ban
By JENNIFER DOMINGUE
For the Daily
University administrators spoke
to students and discussed their
concerns about the impact of a

statewide civil rights initiative
passed in 2006 called Proposal 2,
which banned the use of affirma-
tive action in admissions for public
universities in Michigan, on cam-
pus at an event on Friday.
The open panel discussion,
called "The Rise and Fall of Affir-
mative Action," was hosted by the
National Society of Black Engi-
neers and outlined the history of
affirmative action, its impact on

the University and how it may
shape the future of academics.
The panelists - including Uni-
versity deans and vice provosts
- addressed a crowd of about 70
individuals and invited an open
dialogue with students in the
audience about their undergradu-
ate experiences at the University.
Ted Spencer, associate vice
provost and executive director
of undergraduate admissions,

told those at the event that Pro-
posal 2 caused a lot of controversy
because it led people to believe
that when the University was
using affirmative action in admis-
sions decisions it was accepting
unqualified students.
"One of the misconceptions
of Proposal 2 was that we were
admitting unqualified people," he
said. "That simply wasn't true."
See EVENT, Page 3A

A DIFFERENT KIND OF MEDICAL SCHOOL
More students picking
holistic medical schools

CLOVER-CLAD CARDIO

Officials: Decreased
stigma contributed to
increased interest in
osteopathic medicine
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
LSA senior Elyse Rosenthal
always intended to apply to a tra-
ditional - or allopathic - medical
s hool. It wasn't until months into
her senior year at the University
That she discovered an alternative
way to pursue a medical career:
stiudying osteopathic medicine.
- Now Rosenthal is scrapping her
Original plans in favor of going to
a different type of medical school
that takes a more holistic approach
W5 medicine, focusing on the mind
and spirit as well as the body.
Rosenthal said she considers her
discovery of osteopathic medicine
a "twist of fate" because, for her,
it is an ideal way to practice medi-
cine.
"(The) philosophy and mission
statements of all the osteopathic
schools are exactly how I think
practicing medicine should be,"
0 Rosenthal said.
Each year, hundreds of students
at the University - and hundreds
of thousands of students nation-
wide - apply to medical school.
Only a fraction of them pursue
WEATHER HI: 57
TOMORROW L LO 33

osteopathic medicine, a relatively
new practice that emphasizes
the role of the muscular skeletal
system in overall patient health.
Though the University doesn't
have a osteopathy program, it is
among the top feeder schools in
the nation in the number of stu-
dents who enter the field.
However, in recent years the
percentage of students interest-
ed in osteopathic medicine has
increased substantially, according
to medical school experts.
Gina Moses, associate direc-
tor of application services with
the American Association of Col-
leges of Osteopathic Medicine
(AACOM), said more students are
applying to osteopathy schools
across the nation every year.
"We've seen about an 11.9-per-
cent increase, while interest in MD
schools is pretty much flat-lining,"
she said.
According to the AACOM, the
University is the second highest
feeder school in terms of students
applying to and matriculating at
osteopathic medical schools.
David Brawn, associate direc-
tor for continuing student services
and pre-health advisor at the Uni-
versity, wrote in e-mail interview
that within the last three years,
the number of students interested
in osteopathic medicine at the Uni-
versity has increased.
"The number of UM students
See OSTEOPATHY, Page 2A

BY THE NUMBERS
Studying osteopathy in the U.S.
11.9%
The increase in the number of students
applyingto osteopathy schools across
the country last year.
Te195
The number of University of Michigan
students who applied to Doctor of
Osteopathy schools in 2007.
T388
The number of University of Michigan
students who applied to Doctor of
Osteopathy schools in 2009.
29
Number of Doctor of Osteopathy
degree-granting schools in the United
States, compared to more than
100 Medical Doctor degree-granting
schools, accordingto the
American Association of Colleges of
Osteopathic Medicine.
25
Average MCAT score of Doctor of
Osteopathy students, comparedto an
average score of 30for MD students,
according toMariella Mezcozzi, senior
assistant director of pre-professional
services at the University.

MIA MARINO/Dainy
Participants run on Main Street Saturday as part of the Shamnrocks and Shenanigans 5k Run & Walk benefittingfthe Congenital
Heart Center at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. The event, sponsored by Conor O'Neill's, had more than1,500 participants.
MICH IGA N'S BR AIN DR AIN
Websites respond to concerns
over lack ofj ob s in M ichig an

Sites match job
seeking students to
in-state employers
By SARA BOBOLTZ
For the Daily
When LSA senior Philip Austin
began his job search, he started
looking for a position in Michi-

gan. But much to his dismay, it
was difficult to find a paying job
in the state - a challenge many
graduating seniors looking to
secure employment in Michigan
are facing.
"As my job search has pro-
gressed, it has become much
more likely that I'm going to end
up working somewhere out-of-
state," Austin said.
To counter this problem, many

in the state are developing web-
sites that aim to connect gradu-
ates of Michigan colleges with
employers here.
Lynne Sebille-White, senior
assistant director of the Univer-
sity's Career Center, said Austin
isn't alone in his difficulty with
finding a job in the state. She said
she sees both Michigan natives
and out-of-state students who
See WEBSITES, Page 3A

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news@michigandaily.com and letusknow.

NEW ON MiCHIGANDAILY.COM
Adventures Abroad: Studying students in Spain.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE WIRE

INDEX NEWS.................................2A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
Vol. CXX, No.D109 SUDO KU....... ....... ............3A ARTS........ ......... .. .....7A
62010TheMichiganDaily OPINION..........................4A SPORTSMONDAY......t..........1B
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