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January 11, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-01-11

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ALF SLIDE MYSTERY MESS
tern gave Michigan a Sherlock's got plenty of
comeback medicine. abrawn, not enough brains.
E SPORTSMONDAY, PAGEBSEE ARTS, PAGE 5A
7 4cIfte Mii an Ba Ily

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, January 11, 2010

michigandailycom

DRUMMING IN THE NEW YEAR
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U :Pay raise
shift not the
result of LEO
grievance

MIA MARINO/Daily
Caren Sole and her father, Brian Sole, play the drums in Raoin Taiko, a traditional Japanese drumming group, during the Mochitsuki Japanese Cultural Fair at the School
of Social Work on Saturday. The fair was hosted by the University's Center for Japanese Studies in honor of the Japanese New Year.
IIN IaN Te RESIn-NCpHAL
Houigcagssg-pplc

Lecturers' union
accused 'U' of using
fuzzy math to avoid
giving pay increases
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily News Editor
A significant shift in the funds
used to determine faculty raises is
drawing different responses from
University administrators and the
lecturers' union on campus.
Documents obtained by The
Michigan Daily through a Freedom
of Information Act request detailed
dramatic changes to the four funds
used to fund pay raises for faculty,
which directly impact the size of
THE ABC'S OF LSA SALA
60
50
to 40
aro 30
U 20
10

pay raises for lecturers.
The Lecturers Employment
Organization - the union that
represents lecturers on campus -
contends the shift in funds came
as a result of a grievance they filed
with the University in November
2008. But University officials say
the change is simply part of the
University's cost-cutting strategy
given the down economy.
LEO and the University were
at odds last year when the union
accused University adminis-
trators of moving money from
faculty salary funds that would
obligate the University to give
larger pay raises to lecturers into
See LEO, Page 3A
See FOIA documents for this
I story on
RIES
Funds:
A
C+
..

Residents who have
been living in 'U'
Housing the longest
will have priority
By OLIVIA CARRINO
Daily StaffReporter
In an effort to make the Univer-
sity Housing system fairer, Hous-
ing officials are implementing a
new policy initially proposed in
October that eliminates the option
for students to request the same
room or hall that they currently

live in for next year.
Instead, Housingis instituting a
campus-wide pool in which prior-
ity is given to residents who have
lived in the residence halls the
most consecutive terms. As anoth-
er change, the entire process will
now be completed online.
Lastweek, Housing officials sent
an e-mail to students currently liv-
ing in University residence halls
that included links to informative
tutorials on how to sign up.
University Housing spokesman
Peter Logan said the new process
will be more fair for all current
residents who want to live on cam-
pus next year.

"This year we've eliminated the
same room and same hall selec-
tion," Logan said, "and essentially,
we've broadened this, really, to
be more equitable in providing
residential choices to all students
across the board."
In the new policy, students will
be able to request to live in a single,
double, triple or quad. They will"
also still be able to sign up to live
with a particular roommate or
group of friends.
However, there are a few excep-
tions to the new policy because
some residence halls are only
open to first-year or second-year
students or reserved for learning

communities.
Logan said that rooms will first
be set aside to accommodate the
various learning communities, and
then the selection process will be
opened campus wide.
He added that ifa student living
in a learning community this year
is readmitted to the program next
year, they will most likely be in
the same hall, but he doesn't know
if they will be able to request the
same room.
He added that there will be some
adjustments made to the location
of certain learning communities
due to the closing of Couzens Resi-
See HOUSING, Page.7A

2009 2010
SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

OBITUARY
'' prof. who used numbers
to fight against war dies

A former Navy
sailor, Singer spent
his life quantifying
the dangers of war
By CAITLIN HUSTON
Daily StaffReporter
M
University Prof. Emeritus J.
David Singer, an internationally
renowned teacher, researcher

and scholar of international poli-
tics, died in Ann Arbor on Dec. 28
at the age of 84.
Singer, who had been hos-
pitalized since last September
when he was involved in a car
accident, is survived by his wife
Diane Macaulay, who currently
resides in Ann Arbor, his daugh-
ters Annie and Katie Singer and
his two grandchildren.
Singer joined the Political Sci-
ence Department at the Univer-
sity in 1958, where he remained

a professor until 2007. As a pro-
fessor and researcher, Singer
focused on finding ways to eradi-
cate war through a scientific
approach.
While at the University, he
founded the Correlates of War
project in 1963, which collects
scientific knowledge about war.
David Gellar, professor and chair
of the political science depart-
ment at Wayne State University,
described the project as "the
See SINGER, Page 7A

New A2-based rail line in the works

MIA MARINO/Daily
Former presidents of the campus chapter of the National Society Of Black Engineers hold a panel discussion on Friday.
At event, former NSBE presidents
. .
emphasize com-mumit outreach

System would Arbor and Detroit could soon
alleviate transportation frustra-
include stops in tions.
Last month, the United States
Ypsilanti, Metro Senate budgeted $331 million for
the state of Michigan, including
Airport and Detroit $3.5 million for a proposed rail
service between Ann Arbor and
By MIKE MERAR Detroit that would include stops
For theDaily in Ypsilanti, Dearborn and the
Detroit Metro Airport.
Traveling to the airport and Carmine Palombo, director
downtown Detroit can be a of Transportation Programs for
nightmare for students with- the Southeast Michigan Council
out access to cars, but a newly of Governments, said the budget
proposed rail line between Ann for the new service is not yet set

in stone. But, he said a number of
aspects of the project would be
completed by October 2010.
From Ann Arbor to Detroit,
the service is expected to take
around 50 to 55 minutes. Palom-
bo said exact prices have yet to
be determined, but the cost for a
round-trip ticket will be competi-
tive with other comparable ser-
vices and will most likely range
between $6 and $7.
While many officials have
voiced support for this new ser-
vice, additional funding for the
See TRANSPORTATION, Page 7A

Panelists stress
mentoring students
from local schools
in the sciences
By MICHELE NAROV
For the Daily
A panel from the National Soci-
ety of Black Engineers spoke to
about 100 Engineering students

on Friday night about the group's
efforts to reach out to elementary,
middle and high school students in
Southeast Michigan.
The meeting - held in the
Industrial & Operations Engi-
neering Building on North Cam-
pus - featured five panelists, four
of whom were past NSBE presi-
dents at the University. The panel-
ists - Damaune Journey, Jolene
Ferguson, Erin Teague, Maurice
Telesford and Deandre Reagins -
addressed the organization's role

at the University and in the com-
munity.
NSBE, the largest student-run
organization in the country, pro-
vides academic and professional
opportunities for African-Amer-
ican engineers at the University
and across the nation. In recent
years, the University's chapter has
put an emphasis on reaching out
to students in the Ypsilanti school
districts.
Teague told the audience that
See PANEL, Page 7A

WEATHER HI:23
TOMORROW LO:19

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INDEX NEWS................
Vol. CXX, No. 70 SUDOKU...........
)2010The Michigan Daily OPINION...
michigondailycom """""

...2A ARTS.............5A
...3A CLASSIFIEDS.. ..A...........6A
...4A SPORTSMONDAY............ .1B

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