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February 17, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-02-17

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Hot three-point
o shooting carried
' the men's hoops
team over Iowa in
an overtime thriller
last night.
PAGE 8A

L7bIe ,1kii an 40aig

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, February 17,2010

michigandaily.com

IT1E [J)UATIONAL EXPERIENCE
Lecturer pool
size outaces
increasesIn
tenure faculty
Provost says greater BY THE NUMBERS
increase in lecturers Hiring instructors at the University
hasn't hurt 9%
classroom experience increase in the numberottenuredand
tenure-trackfaculty at the University
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN over the last five years.
Daily Staff Reporter 40 %
The number of lecturers working
at the University increased 40 per- The Uncrese in the number of lecturers at
cent over the lastfive years - a num-
ber that far outpaces the 9-percent
increase in the number of tenured
and tenure-track University faculty Number of undergraduates and graduate
over that same period of time. students enrolled in thefall 2000.
But Provost Teresa Sullivan says
that discrepancy hasn't hurt the
education experience offered by the 41r674
University, arguing instead that lec- Number of undergraduates and graduate
turers are often in unique positions students enrolled in fall 2009.
to better teach underclassmen in
lower-level classes. members whose primary occupa,
According to the Integrated Post- tional responsibility is teaching;
secondary Education Data System, Individualswith courtesytitles wh
an internal system for keeping Uni- are unpaid or faculty whose primary
versity data, the number of Univer- appointment is administrative, but
sity professors - including those still have some teaching responsi-
who have tenure and those on the bilities, are not counted in the data.
tenure track - increased about 9 Likewise, the University's
percent, from 1,263 in 2004 to 1,373 Human Resources department has
last year. Meanwhile, the number of compileddata that shows a similar
lecturers increased by about 40 per- trend. But, unlike the IPEDS study,
cent, from 546 lecturers in 2004 to the Human Resources data includes
766 in 2009. all faculty members, regardless of
IPEDS data only counts faculty See HIRES, Page 7A

JAKE FROMM/Da itsMore photos at
Members of the men's soccer team perform at Hill Audtorium last night as part of Murk tRk 2010. The fundraiser features skits phto a
performed by Michigan varsity athletes. The women's cross country and track teams won the talent competition.
MICH IGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
MSA bA
MSAbegins process of picking
student health in1,1surance lvendor

Aetna plan is the
frontrunner for
MSA endorsement
By ELYANA TWIGGS
Daily StaffReporter
At last night's Michigan Stu-
dent Assembly meeting, the
assembly began the process of

choosing a student health insur-
ance vendor to endorse.
This year is a bid year, which
means differ-
ent insurance NOTEBOOK
providers will
be bidding for the opportunity to
provide studenthealthinsurance.
MSA will have the opportunity to
endorse one of the companies.
Four members of University
Health Service's Student Insur-

ance Committee lobbied for their
proposed insurance provider
option to MSA at last night's
meeting. The Student Insurance
Committee includes Chief Health
Officer Robert Winfield, students
and other parties. At the meet-
ing, the committee introduced
Aetna Student Health - the same
health plan that has been avail-
able to University students for
the last 10 years - as the most

compatible option for students.
Karen Klever, student insur-
ance manager at UHS, said Aetna
Student Health was the best
option out of 14 potential compa-
nies.
"Our choice (was) determined
by what other schools in the Big
Ten are doing in terms of insur-
ance plans," Klever said.
Mahanti said the assembly
See MSA, Page 7A

MICHIGAN PROMISE SCHOLARSHIP
'U' students skeptical of
revamped Promise grant

In proposed budget,
scholarship would
0 become $4,000
tax credit
By TORREY ARMSTRONG
Daily StaffReporter
After the fate of the Michigan
Promise Scholarship experienced
a rollercoaster ride of ups and
downs before ultimately being
cut in the state's final budget for

the 2010 fiscal year, the fate of
the grant program has now taken
another turn.
Democratic Gov. Jennifer Gra-
nholm unveiled a plan to restore
the Promise Scholarship in a
new form in her budget proposal
released Thursday. Under Gra-
nholm's plan, the scholarship
would reappear in the 2011 fiscal
year budget, but this time as a tax
credit given to graduates of state
universities who stay in Michigan
to work for a year or longer after
completing their education.
Students interviewed over the

last week said that while Gran-
holm's plan to reinstate the Prom-
ise Scholarship is a good initiative,
some expressed skepticism as to
whether legislators will actually
follow through with the proposal
since it's in the form of a tax cred-
it. In addition, students voiced
concern that a $4,000 tax credit
may not be enough of an incentive
to keep graduates in Michigan.
The original Promise Schol-
arship program - which 6,096
University students were eligible
for this academic year, accord-
See PROMISE, Page 7A

CAMPUS SAFETY
Greek community uses workshops
to battle sexual assault statistics

EMILY CH iU/Dai
Dr. Tachi Yamada spoke yesterday about child health care in developing nations in the Biomedical Science Research Building.
Global Health Program pres. talks
health care in developing nations

Official: One-in-five
students will be a
victim of sexual
assault at college
By VERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
In an effort to combat the prev-
alence of sexual assault on cam-
WEATHER HI 32
TOMORROW LO: 25

pus, the Greek community has
been holding chapter workshops
with the Sexual Assault Preven-
tion and Awareness Center and
campus organizations to inform
fraternities and sororities about
sexual assault and discuss ways to
prevent it.
Aimee Nimeh, SAPAC assistant
director for education and train-
ing, said there are no statistics
regarding sexual assaults at the
University and within the Greek
GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
newssmichigandaily.com and let us

community. However, according
to the Department of Justice, 10.3
percent of sexual assaults take
place in fraternity houses across
the country. In addition, nearly 60
percent of sexual assaults occur in
a victim's living quarters.
Nimeh said one-in-five students
will be a victim of a completed or
attempted sexual assault during
his or her time at a university.
Nimeh added that, with those
See SEXUAL ASSAULT, Page 7A

At campus event, Dr.
Yamada challenges
University students
By CAITLIN HUSTON
Daily StaffReporter
Tachi Yamada, president of the
Bill and Melinda Gates Founda-
tion's Global Health Program,
encouraged students and faculty
to think ofuniversities as the place
to solve tomorrow's health care
problems, at a speech he delivered

on campus yesterday.
Addressing a crowd of about
250 physicians, medical students
and undergraduates in the Bio-
medical Science Research Build-
ing's Kahn Auditorium, Yamada
spoke about the program's pri-
mary goal, "to reduce the number
of unwanted deaths among chil-
dren."
The Global Health Program
has several grant initiatives like
Grand Challenges Explorations,
which provides $100,000 to pro-
fessional researchers or students
who come up with a new idea

for treating health conditions in
developing nations.
Yamada said one invention that
came out of this program was the
Kangaroo Mother's Care, a strap
that a human mother can wear so
that she has skin-to-skin contact
with her baby. This allows low-
birthweight infants to be warmer,
promotes bonding and provides
protection against infections.
He added that ideas for the
Global Health Program' could
come from University students,
adding that he noticed,. "young
See GLOBAL HEALTH, Page 7A

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MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE TABLE

INDEX NEWS
Vol.CXX,No.96 OPINION.....................
(02 The Michigan Daily ARTS ....................
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..2A CLASSIFIEDS....................6A
.4A SPORTS. . .... .....8A
.5A THESTATEMENT........1B

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