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February 11, 2010 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-02-11

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2B - Thursday, February 11, 2010

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

FOOD I° WARS

*I

BLIMPY BURGER
You might have to wait in a line out the
door or get yelled at by temperamental
employees. But all the hassle is worth it
for what's truly Ann Arbor's best slab of
meat. Other burger joints around town
have tried to emulate the formula of daily-
ground fresh beef and exotic extras like
salami or egg, but Blimpy is the original
king of greasy goodness.
SAVA'S
Maybe it was the low-lit, hip ambi-
ance, but I took my seat at the Sava's bar
expecting my burger to be pretty posh.
What I got instead was a sloppy, semi-
cooked slab, quickly prepared and care-
lessly assembled. Considering this wasn't
2 a.m. and I wasn'thammered - in which
case the burger wouldvebeen perfect - I
left feelinga little less than smitten.

CASEY'S TAVERN
With a rustic American tavern atmo-
sphere, Casey's is a great place to sit
down for a delicious burger. Offering you
a choice of three toppings among a very
long list, Casey's lets you perfect your
burger experience. But burgers are on the
slightly expensive side, and could stand to
be a bit juicier. Great burgers to be sure,
BURGERS but maybe not the best.
QUICKIE BURGER
It's quick, yes, and the proprietors are
always friendly and armed with a good-
natured quip or two. But how come I
always leave feeling abitunsatisfied with
a Major Burger? The bun's fine, the top-
pings are standard-issue and the meat is
... sufficiently meaty. There's just nothing
extraordinary here. Except for the Spe-
cial Sauce - that shit's delicious.

AND THE WINNER IS: BuMPY BURGER
CAMPUS CLASH
LAST WEEK'S RESULTS:
Phil Hanlon was just moving into his new provost office when he found it
had been infiltrated with the combatative Markley strippers. Hanlon swiftly
pulled out his accordian of death to try to cease the stripping. But the
strippers were used to the deafeningly loud music of Markley, and the
accordion had no effect. The strippers stripped on to victory.
WINNER: THE MARKLEY STRIPPERS

The Daily Arts weekly show
"Accost'd" continues with more
belligerent entertainment action.
To find out what your University
companions want for Valentine's
Day, watch the chocolatey,
blossoming episode at
michigandaily.com/section/arts.
Weekend Freebies
Because boredom doesn't end
when your cash flow does
Thursday, February 11
Masters Recital: Christopher
Turbessi
Sweet piano noises
Britton Recital Room, 8 p.m.
Poetry Reading: John Burnside y,
Multipleaward-winning poet
Helmut Stern, 5 p.m.
Friday, February 121
Their Journey: Vietnamese
Michigan'
Exhibit of rare photos
exploring Vietnamese
immigrants in Michigan
Hatcher Library Room100,8 'a.i /
Saturday, February 13
Student Chamber Music Recital
Fine Italian sonatas, fo free!
Anderson Moore Hall, 8 p.m.

WHAT'S NEW
ON THE DAILY
ARTS BLOG
. Penguin destruction
and desert ambling: If this
week's discontinued web comics
prove anything, itsthat random phi-
losophizing and poor use of MS Paint
do have a place on the Internet.
. An alternate opinion
on 'Lost': Jamie Block liked this
week's episode of 'Lost,' but appar-
ently nobody else does. Read as he
tries to defend himself against their
criticisms, and post your thoughts.
. Not buzzworthy: The not-
at-all-anticipated-or-even-known-
about Google Buzz ishere. It's like
Twitter, but for people you can
already talk to any time you want.
But you can post pictures, which
you couldn't do in ... oh, wait.

THIS WEEK'S FIGHT:

CHARLIE
WHITE ,VS

MERYL
-DAVIS

ARMED WITH:
A winning smile and
a tarantula.

ARMED WITH:
A winning smile and a
"Bop It Extreme."

VOTE ONLINE AT
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTION/ARTS

WHEN YOU APPLY TO DAILY ARTS,
AN ANGEL GETS ITS WINGS.
E-mail join.arts@umich.edu for,
information on applying.
Are You Considering a Career in Health?
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University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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particularly chronic disease.
Health and health-related industries are among the fastest-
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Statistics, and those holding Master of Public Health degrees are
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Our MPH degree provides intensive education and training in
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more information, visit our website:

'U' alum jazzes up the Michigan

Award-winning
documentary looks
at high school jazz
By TIMOTHY RABB
Daily Arts Writer
in most artistic endeavors,
there's a fine line between art
that's merely
a product of "CHOPS"
necessity and
art that extends Tomorrow
from the inner- at 7 p.m.
most reaches Michigan Theater
of the soul. For Ticketsfrom $7
competitive
young musi-
cians, such subtleties amount to
the difference between wide-
spread renown and a long bus
ride home.
In his documentary "CHOPS,"
University alum and debut film
director Bruce Broder explores
the intricacies of jazz perfor-
mance with an intimate look into
three public schools in different
parts of the country. The film fol-
lows each school's jazz band as its

members rehearse a rigorous rep-
ertoire for a competition in New
York City.
One may be tempted to chuckle
at the thought of such an under-
taking - many college students
share embarrassing memories of
sub-par high school music depart-
ments, forever doomed to fumble
through their umpteenth rendi-
tion of the "Star Wars" theme song
as musicianship is continually
forgone in favor of sports fund-
ing. Fortunately, Broder's sub-
jects occupy a young elite who are
privileged enough to attend public
schools that place a disproportion-
ate emphasis on music over sports.
While watching the film, one
begins to see distinct similarities
between the camaraderie of these
musicians and the fraternity one
might observe on a competitive
sports team. Broder saw this simil-
itude, but-also saw that the media
has been spotlighting one group
vastly over the other and wanted
to shrink the gap.
"The primary draw of this con-
cept was the fact that very few
documentarians bother with the
subject of high school jazz bands,"

Broder said. "Sportsmen are fre-
quently the subjects of documen-
taries and mass media, so it was a
great opportunity to share these
kids' unsung musical passions
with the world."
Broder also wanted to show
off just how talented these young
musicians are. The technical skill
and affinity for perfectionism that
these tight-knit groups of teenage
jazz enthusiasts share rival the tal-
ent normally expected of veteran
musicians twice their age.
"What these kids have is a pure
love of music, a love of perfor-
mance," Broder said.
Pure doesn't even begin to
describe it. The documentary's
introduction clearly demonstrates
the hard work each student invests
in his or her craft. They're sur-
prisingly humble in spite of their.
abundant talent, and equally unre-
lenting in their endeavors to win
the competition.
"As a band parent myself, I fol-
lowed these kids from middle
school through high school, and
in middle school they all shared an
incredible degree of commitment
See JAZZ, Page 4B

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www.mph.illinois.edu

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