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February 01, 2010 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-02-01

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AN IN-STATE PI IT

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* I 10vBMsa - Why Austin indie-rock underdogs
After dropping n in East Lansing Friday, Spoon might just be the best band
'M' came back to stun State at the Joc. of the last decade.
i PAGE1B ) PAGE 8A

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, February 1,2010

UPWARDb OVER AT HTLLT

michigandaily com
U IVERSITY L AW SCHOOL
In Lawyers
Club, access
to recycling
bins limited

Mi A MARNO/Daily More photos from the show
Iron and Wine performs at the 33rd annual Ann Arbor Folk Festival at Hill Auditorium on Friday. The festival, which ran through Saturday, °ii oo rmteso
featured performances by Doc Watson and Richie Havens, among others. The Folk Festival is a benefit for local performance venue The Ark. at
2010 CENUS
Expert: College towns hurt
by students' census confus-ion

Res
ci
Lam
LawyE
withir
foul o
ing vo
in the
Unl
camps
bins
or rat
Instea
walk t
to rec
studer
recycl
in the
Sec
Mao,N
yers C
recycl
dence
"Th
bins i
Mao

-idence hall only walk to a lounge that's separate
from the residential building."
has recycling Mao said residents were more
likely to throw their recyclables
receptacles 111 in the trash, given the close prox-
.a imity of trashcans in their rooms
elltral location1 and halls. He added that he
thinks if bins were added around
By MIKE MERAR the building, students and staff
DailyStaffReporter would.certainly recycle more
often.
w students living in the The Lawyers Club building is
ers Club, a residence hall divided into blocks, with each
n the Law Quad, are crying consisting of four to five rooms.
ver what they call a surpris- Though none have any recycling
id of recycling receptacles bins, those living within the Law-
storied building's hallways. yers Club can recycle by taking
like other residence halls on materials to a central location in
us, there are no recycling the building.
available within the halls Diane Nafranowicz, director of
oms in the Lawyers Club. the Lawyers Club, said the reason
d, residents there have to there are no recycling bins in resi-
o a central location in order dential areas is that they cause a
ycle o a hassle that some safety hazard if students need to
nts say is forcing would-be leave in an emergency. .
ers to simply throw things "Fightnow, in any of the physi-
trash. cal buildings, there isn't a plastic
ond-year Law student Eric or paper recycling in the hallway
who used to live in the Law- because of the physical layout of
lub, said it was difficult to the building," Nafranowicz said.
e while living in the resi- "With one means of egress, the
hall. fire marshal doesn't allow any-
ere weren't any recycling thing in those stairwells."
n our actual dorm area," Besides student housing, the
said. "We would have to See RECYCLING, Page 3A

'U' launching video
campaign today to
encourage students
to fill out forms
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
For the Daily
The University launched a video
advertisement contest today meant
to increase student participation in

the 2010 national census.
During the last census in 2000,
students living in college towns like
Ann Arbor had the lowest response
rates of any demographic. Lisa
Neidert, director of data services at
the University's Population Studies
Center said students often choose
not to fill out the census because
they are confused about how the
survey works -or because they are
concerned about the amount of
time it takes.
In an effort to clear up the con-

fusion and encourage students to
fill out the survey, Neidert is work-
ing with the Institute for Social
Research and the Office of the Pro-
vost on a campaign aimed at raising
low census participation by Univer-
sity students.
Any registered student may sub-
mit avideo encouraging students to
fill out the census. Students, faculty
and staff will be able to vote on sub-
missions on YouTube and the Uni-
versity's website and only the first
250 entries will be available for

judging. The top two vote getters
will get a $1,000 cash prize. The
deadline for submissions is March
8.
Every 10 years, the United States
government is required by the U.S.
Constitution to survey the popula-
tion in order to gauge how many
people are living in the country at
the time. The 2010 census forms
will be mailed in March and will be
due on April 1.
According to thecensuspro-
See CENSUS, Page 3A

SWINE FLU UPDATE I
Officials: Students should
still get H1Ni vaccination

UHS, CDC warn
of possible new
wave of virus in
Feb. or March
By DEBJANI MUKHERJEE
DailyStaffReporter
While fears about swine flu are
dying down, University health

officials are still concerned about
the virus and are encouraging
students to get vaccinated.
Despite the increased number
of vaccinations available at the
University Health Service, the
number of students and faculty
being vaccinated at the University
has decreased since HIN virus
vaccinations became available in
November, according to UHS offi-
cials.
According to a recent study

by the American College Health
Association, during the month of
January, only 4.2 percent of the
vaccinations available to Michi-
gan residents have been used as
of Jan. 22.
From Sept. 1, 2009 to Jan. 18,
2010, UHS saw 810 cases of influ-
enza-like illnesses, according to
RobertWinfield, chief health offi-
cer of the University and director
of UHS. But Winfield said there
See H1N1, Page 3A

LOCAL BUSINESS
New wax salon opens on South U.

Irl Duling, director of Terhertz Business Development at Picometrix (left), scans Jeff White, a research scientist for the com-
pany, with an industrialized prototype of a scanner technology which may be used in airport security.
A2 company develops new
security tech. for airports

The Wax Loft offers
waxing, facials and
skin care services
By LAUREN SLUTSKY
For theDaily
While students sip on mocha
lattes and cappuccinos at
Espresso Royale, others are
enduring pain for the sake of
beauty, just a few floors above.
The Wax Loft - a salon offer-
ing waxing and skin treatments
located above Espresso Royale
on South University - officially

opened its door to customers in
December. The space was pre-
viously occupied by a custom
denim store called Party in Our
Pants.
Rebecca Tober, 26, and Stacy
Wood, 25 - both licensed esthe-
ticians who own The Wax Loft
- met a few years ago while
working at an Ann Arbor salon
and recently decided it was time
to pursue their own business
venture.
Tober said the two wanted
to offer a place where students
could "come feeling comfort-
able straight out of bed in their
pajamas."

The two women run the salon
by themselves, with no outside
help.
Tober specializes in full body
waxing and advanced skin care
treatments like chemical peals
and enzyme treatments, while
Wood is acertified massage
therapist and also specializes in
full body waxing.
Tober and Wood said they
strive to make the salon a warm,
nurturing environment by
offering customers tea or straw-
berry water upon arrival.
In addition, Wood said they
always walk customers through
See SALON, Page 7A

Terahertz scan said
to be less invasive
but still as effective
as other processes
By A. BRAD SCHWARTZ
Daily StaffReporter
The failed Christmas Day plot to
blow up an airliner flying into the

Detroit Metro Airport has height-
ened the debate over security in
America's airports, leading to
concerns about how invasive secu-
rity screening should be. An Ann
Arbor-based company is develop-
ing new technology that might
answer that question.
Rob Risser, chief financial offi-
cer of Advanced Photonix, Inc.,
said the firm has been experiment-
ing for years to harness electro-
magnetic waves called terahertz.

The technology has already been
applied in aerospace and pharma-
ceutical applications, among oth-
ers. The company believes it could
now be used to help airport secu-
rity efforts.
"We're using pulsed terahertz
technology," Risser said. "That
frequency interacts with organic
materials that allows us to deter-
mine threats that would be con-
cealed threats -under clothing, in
See TECHNOLOGY, Page 7A

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