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January 22, 2010 - Image 2

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2 - Friday, January 22, 2010

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Friday, January 22, 2010 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

TUESDAY:
Professor Profiles

WEDNESDAY:
Before You Were Here

THURSDAY:
Campus Clubs

NEED MORE PHOTOS?
See so many more photos of the week
on our website, michigandailycom.

LEFT Demetreius Russell (right) with classmate Lawrence Mead are students of University alum George Gong, who is a teacher for Teach for America in Chicago. Gong brought some
of his students to Ann Arbor for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. (MAX COLLINS/Daily) MIDDLE Rackham student Kate Stenvig of the University's chapter of By Any Means Necessary
marches on Monday to bring back affirmative action. (ARIEL BOND/Daily) TOP RIGHT Nathaniel May, a Music, Theatre & Dance senior, on Monday at the Law Quad. May spent a year
in South Africa studying the impact of jazz music on apartheid in the country's history. (MAX COLLINS/Daily). BOTTOM RIGHT LSA senior Andre Schultz competes in the 200-yard
backstroke race against Indiana University in the swimming and diving competition at Canham Natatorium on Saturday Jan. 9. (JAKE FROMM/Daily).

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01

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

County police Earrings stolen Golden Apple Theatrical
1 1_ A A i". , , ,,L,,..,,

venicie stolen WH
WHt
WHERE: Wagner and Liberty 11:30
WHEN: Wednesday at around WHO
6 p.m. repo
WHAT: DPS provided a K9 ringr
unit to apprehend suspects in shop
the case of a stolen Washtenaw noon
County police vehicle, University polic
police reported. The vehicle was susp(
stolen from Scio Farms and was
found abandoned on the corner
of Wagner and Liberty Streets. r
Police dogs were used to track
down the suspects. br
Parked car hit not
WHI
WHERE: Palmer parking WHI
structure pon.
WHEN: Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. WHA
WHAT: A parked car was repor
struck, causing the bumper to of a p
fall off, University police report- repo
ed. There are no suspects. taken
MORE ONLINE
Love Crime Notes? Get more online at michigand

ERE: University Hospital
EN: Wednesday at around
a.m.
:AT: Hospital security
rted that a pair of ear-
s was stolen from the gift
on Tuesday between
iand 7 p.m., University
e reported. There are no
ects.
inter lock
oken,
thing stolen
ERE: Duderstadt Building
EN: Tuesday at about 6
AT: A staff member
rted a lock was broken off
rinter, University police
rted, though it wasn't
n.c
Jaily.com/blogs/the wire

AwiI[Us Ud1ct snoUw

WHAT: Students can
nominate professors for the
Golden Apple Award. The
winner will have the oppor-
tunity to give their ideal
'last lecture' in March.
WHO: Hillel
WHEN: Today until Feb. 5
WHERE: thegoldenap-
pleaward.com
Multiple dance
performances
WHAT: Dance teams
RhythM Tap Ensemble,
Pure Dance Extreme and
Michigan Bhangra team
will perform, in addition to
acapella group Complusive
Lyres.
WHO: RhythM Tap Ensemble
WHEN: Tonight at 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Mendelssohn
Theatre

WHAT: The Bill T. Jones/
Arnie Zane Dance Company
will perform "Fondly Do We
Hope...Fervently Do We Pray,"
a performance exploring-
Abraham Lincoln's life. Tick-
ets are $18-$44.
WHO: University Musical
Society
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Power Center
CORRECTIONS
" A subheadline in yester-
day's edition of The Daily
titled "Campus Mobilizes
for Haiti Recovery" incor-
rectly identified Sacha Mon-
tas' title. He is a resident at
the University Hospital.
" Please report any errormin
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

Following national trends in
the dip in the housing mar-
tke, the real estate value of
the White House decreased 5.1
percent from $308 million in
2008 to $292.5 million in 2009,
cnn.com reported. The price
of houses across the country
dropped 5 percent on average
last year.
In 2008, 46.3 million
Americans didn't have
health insurance, accord-
ing to statistics released by
the U.S. Census Bureau.
FOR MORE,SEEOPINION, PAGE4.
According to BBC.com,
Toyota is recalling 2.3
million U.S. cars due
to faulty accelerator pedals.
4.2 million Toyota cars were
recalled in United States in
October 2009 also because of
pedal malfunctions.

01

WANT TO WRITE FOR THE DAILY? Jury picked for Kansas
Come to our last mass meeting of the semester.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 24TH AT 6PM
° ~" _420 MAYNARD ST. abortion shooting trial

Judge vows to keep
abortion debate out
of the courtroom
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) - The
man charged with killing a Kansas
abortion doctor will have his fate
decided by jurors picked mostly in
secret for a trial that has already
inflamed both sides of the nation's
abortion debate.
The selection process that ulti-
mately whittled the jury down to
eight men and six women took six
days and occurred for the most
part behind closed doors. Which
two jurors are alternates will be
decided later.
Only the final hour and a half of

jury questioning was open to the
media - and then only the four
news outlets that had appealed the
ruling closing it were allowed in the
courtroom. Members of the public
were turned away from all of it.
Opening statements are expect-
ed Friday, which is also the 37th
anniversary of the Supreme Court's
decision in Roe v. Wade that legal-
ized abortion.
ScottRoeder is accused of fatally
shooting Dr. George Tiller on May
31 at a Wichita church. Tiller was
one of the few doctors in the U.S.
who performed late-term abor-
tions. Roeder, 51, of Kansas City,
Mo., is charged with first-degree
murder and aggravated assault.
Roeder told The Associated Press
in November that he killed Tiller

Think you know where to
find the Best Dessert?
Do you have the Best Pick-up Line?
Is your landlord the Best?
Cast your vote in the Michigan Daily's
Annual Readership Survey Poll!
Vtefor the
B3est of
Ann Arbor
Voting extended to January 29th!
Go to: http://www.michigandailycom/best-2010
to cast your vote today.

to protect unborn children. He has
pleaded notguilty to the charges.
The secretive start to one of the
nation's highest-profile trials relat-
ed to abortion did little to quell
public distrust that it will be fair.
"This is the kind of thing that
invokes the specter of Star Chamber
proceedings," said Dr. Warren Hern
of Boulder, Colo., referring to an
English court in the 1600s that met
in secret and became a symbol of the
misuse of power by the monarchy.
"Secret proceedings are the
antithesis of a democratic society,"
said Hern, a longtime friend of Til-
ler who also performs late-term
abortions.
The prosecution questioned
prospective jurors for an hour and
15 minutes in the open yesterday,
while the defense spent just 18 min-
utes doing so. Little distinguished
the jurors, who mostly answered in
chorus to blanket questions about
whether they would decide the case
on the evidence alone and whether
they agreed that Roeder is presumed
innocent.
Lawyers on both sides then
again retreated behind closed
doors with the judge to make
their juror strikes.
It is unknown publicly what
the jurors' opinions are on the
pivotal issue of the case: abor-
tion..Nor does the public know
their occupations or much else
about them.
District Judge Warren Wilbert
has repeatedly said the thial will
not turn into a debate over abor-
tion, warning Roeder's lawyers
that he intends to keep the case
as a -criminal, first-degree mur-
der trial."
The closed jury process took
place even as the U.S. Supreme
Court ruled Tuesday in a drug
trafficking case that the Con-
stitution's guarantee of a public
trial means judges may not ordi-
narily close their courtrooms
during jury selection.
The Sixth Amendment gives
criminal defendants the right to
insist on a public trial, extending
even to jury selection, the court
said. In earlier rulings, the U.S.
Supreme Court had said that the
public and the news media could
assert their right to attend all the
phases of a trial.

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