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November 05, 2009 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-11-05

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RECORD STORE BLUES
ay mamrage ban
scary line ofHow Ann Arbor's record stores
laws. are hanging on by a thread.
PININ PAGE 4A SEE THE B-SIDE, INSIDE

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, November 5, 2009

michigandaily.com

CAMPUS PSYCHOLOGICAL SCRVICES
CAPS takes
on concerns

LIGHTS. CAMERA. THE CUBE

Renovations, additional
counselors and new
database part of effort to
solve students' criticisms
By VERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
For many students, the Counseling and
Psychological Services center has been a
go-to resource for assistance with issues
they're facing on campus, but for some it
has been more of a source of stress than
relief.
Many students have raised concerns
about the long waiting time for a sched-
uled appointment, long entrance assess-
ments - or informational forms - and
talk of only being able to meet with a spe-
cific counselor three times.
CAPS officials said they are aware of
these concerns and misconceptions and
are working toward improving them by
renovating the center, hiring more coun-
selors and creating a new database of
community providers.

Todd Sevig, CAPS's director, saidCAPS
is taking on a new approach to helping
student mental health issues by thinking
in a more campus-wide and community
connection mindset.
"No one entity on campus is going to
be able at any one moment to address
every need for every student in the year,"
he said. "So the new database will really
help in that regard."
The community providers database,
which is expected to go live on Monday,
will allow students to look up a provider
that fits their needs, has current open-
ings, takes their insurance and is within
walking distance.
"It's a little different than a typical
database or obviously looking in a phone
book," Sevig said. "It's all geared toward
student life."
As part of the renovation, four new
offices in the center are expected to be
completed by the end of the week and
appointments there are scheduled for as
early as next week.
Sevigsaid the increased space and staff
to fill the rooms is the "most concrete
way" the center is addressing the student
See CAPS, Page SA

JU
SAMANTHA TRAUBEN/Daily
Scenes from the movie "Trust" are shot at the Cube yesterday. The movie is being directed by David Schwimmer and will star Clive Owen and Catherine
Keener. "Trust" is a dark drama about the damaging effects an online sexual predator has on a family. The movie is scheduled to be released next fall.
SER IES: AFTER THEY WALK
Laurie Miller, the Beltway lawyer

GA M BLING F OR A C A U SE
* At Heidelberg, anteing
up for local charities

Bar has permits from
the state to host charity
poker tournaments
By ELYANA TWIGGS
Daily StaffReporter
For many nonprofit organizations, the
economic downturn has stifled fundrais-
ing efforts. However, a local bar is stack-
ing the deck to encourage University
students and area residents to give back.
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednes-
day nights mean charity poker at The
Heidelberg - a German bar and restau-
rant on Main Street. The smoky upstairs
bar converts into a miniature casino,
complete with five poker tables, two cash
tables and a blackjack table. And though
the house always wins at most casinos,

at The Heidelberg, charities are the true
winners, the program's coordinators say.
One week last month, 50 percent of the
entrance fees went to benefit Disabled
American Veterans. Every week, a differ-
ent nonprofit organization benefits, and
the poker room is booked with charity
events until March of next year.
Volunteer Jim Altman calls these char-
ity poker nights "millionaire parties."
"The reason (the poker nights) have
gotten more popular is because with the
economythe way it is, less and less people
are willing to give a nice share of money
to charities," Altman said. "It is an excel-
lent way for charities to make money for
their.group."
With attendees including everyone
from Ann Arbor residents to Law School
students, the charity poker room can
raise anywhere from $50 to $10,000 for a
See POKER, Page SA

University alum
now calls the shots
at Washington
law firm
By JILLIAN BERMAN
Daily NewsEditor
WASHINGTON D:C. -
Though she's sitting in a
cool, crisp conference room,
perched high above the sultry
concrete jungle of downtown
Washington D.C., University
alum Laurie Miller is very
much in the thick of things.
As chair of powerful law
firm Nixon Peabody's gov-
ernment investigations and
white-collar defense practice,
Miller is charged with defend-
ing some of the nation's most
powerful and influential fig-
ures. Her clients have included
multiple Congressmen, presi-
dents of Fortune 500 compa-
nies and officials in both Bush
administrations and the Clin-
ton administration. But Miller
isn't much of a namedropper.

"I can tell if I've done a good
job if nobody ever knows that
my client is under investiga-
tion," she said in an interview
in late August.
When she's not writing
briefs or defending her clients'
good name in the courtroom,
Miller finds other ways to
get involved in the Washing-
ton scene. As co-chair of the
National Women's Forum for
Obama, she held one of the
first fundraisers for the then-
senator from Illinois.
And after becoming presi-
dent, Obama didn't forget
Miller. She was there when he
announced his nomination of
Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the
Supreme Court.
Though Miller has been in
Washington for more than
30 years, she wasn't always a
power broker. In fact, her rise
to the top began with a letter
to another University alum
that she penned when she was
a junior majoring in political
science and French at the Uni-

versity.
"My Congressman at the
time was the House (of Rep-
resentatives) Minority Leader
named Gerald R. Ford," she
said, reclining in a board room
chair and sipping a can of Diet
Coke. "And I wrote a letter
asking for an internship."
A few months later, Miller
moved to Washington for the
summer.
"I got hooked on it," she
said. "Washington was every-
thing I had been hearing about
and studying about in Ann
Arbor."
When she got back to the
University in the fall, Mill-
er continued to pursue her
degrees and soon thereafter
found out that her former boss
was going to become a much
larger player in American poli-
tics.
Carolyn Burgess, Miller's
roommate at the Delta, Delta
Delta sorority house, remem-
bers sitting around the tele-
vision with other girls in the
house on an October night
in 1973, when Spiro Agnew
resigned from his post as vice

president.
As the history goes, Ford
replaced Agnew.
"My recollection was that
(Miller) had had (Ford) write
her reference letters. We all
said 'Oh my gosh, she's got
the U.S. vice president writ-
ingherreference letters," Bur-
gess said. "Typical Laurie just
being herself, she had these
amazing people that thought
well of her."
But Burgess added that she
wouldn't have expected any-
thing less of Miller, who spent
many of her nights staying
up late in the Undergraduate
Library.
"I've got some really stupid
pictures of us horsing around
the sorority house and she's
not in some of them because
she was a more serious stu-
dent," Burgess said. "But she
was never holier than thou
about it. She just did what she
did."
Burgess said she can often
remember Miller coming in to
the sorority house with stacks
of books in her hands and her
See AFTER THEY WALK,;PageSA

RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY

SOCIAL SAFETY
Makeup magic: Lip gloss product
tests drinks for date rape drugs

British product
conceals test strip
in makeup handle
By LINDSAY KRAMER
Daily StaffReporter
Students entering college are
often warned about the dangers of
putting their drinks down at par-
ties. But thanks to a new product,
there's more they can do to protect
themselves from date rape drugs.
2LoveMyLips recently devel-
oped a lip gloss that comes with
a small, portable kit that can be
used to test a drink to see if it was
spiked with drugs. The kit includes
a pink taper slip that, when placed
into a drink, will turn blue if the
drink contains traces of GHB or

ketamine - common date rape
drugs.
The product was first launched
in the United Kingdom and has
showed positive sales in beauty
salons across the country. The
company plans not only to bring
the gloss overseas, but also to
make it available at bars and in
restrooms so it is accessible if
someone is concerned that their
drink has been tainted.
Although the company's owner
Tracy Whittaker said she expect-
ed sales to focus on women ages
17-35, the product has been sold to
men as well as women of all ages.
She said men have been buyingthe
product for their wives, daughters
and girlfriends.
Whittaker is looking to bring
her product overseas as soon as
possible and is seeking a distribu-

tor. The largest portion of online
sales has come from the United
States.
"We would love to get it onto
the college campuses," Whittaker
said, "because that's where there
is a lot of (drink) spiking."
Aimee Nimeh, Sexual Assault
Prevention and Awareness Center
assistant director for education
and training at the University, said
she isn't sure how effective the
product would be at the Univer-
sity, especially considering it only
tests for GHB and ketamine.
She added that date rape drugs
are not as prevalent on campus in
date rape cases.
"We don't see very many cases
of the date rape drug being used,"
she said. "Alcohol on its own is
more widely used."
See LIP GLOSS, Page 7A

cHANEL VoN-HA BSBURG LOTHRINGEN/Daly
Scott Johnson of Livonia, Mich. (left) and Dwight McCauley of South Lyon, Mich. - both of whom are glazers for Edwards Glass
Company - install drip edges to windows in the new wing of the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

WEATHER HI: 49
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