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October 28, 2009 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-10-28

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- ----- -------
The Michiom Daily --- VVednesday, October 28, 2009

Wcencsday, October 28, 2009 - TThc Michigan Gaily 7B

Magazine Editor:
Jessica Vosgerchian
Editor inChief:
Gary Graca
Managing Editor:
Courtney Ratkowiak
Photo Editor:
Sam Wolson
TheJunk Drawer:
Brian Tengel
Center spreaddesign:
Coreen DeFever
Cover photo:
Jake Fromm
The Statement is The Michigan
Daily's news magazine, distributed
every Wednesday during the
academic year.

new rules
rule 221: If
you're going to
fall asleep in
class, don't sit in
the front of the
lecture hall. Your
drooling might
distract the
professor. rule
222: Don't be
annoyed when
you explain your
esoteric Hal-
loween costume
several times
and people still
don't get it. rule
223: Sexy nurses
and sailors aren't
that sexy when
they're shivering.
Wear a coat or a
fall appropriate
costume.
- E-mail rule submissions to
TheStatement@umich.edu

Mak sue tudents
fllinto the rih crib.
fit ZaURealty 'Pageo
TheAnnArbor ordinance doesntstop studentsfrom
thinking about housing early, so why should you?Advertise
leases fornow, May, and Fallzoio! Reach over40,0o
students and other University members.
Presented by The Michigan Daily Classifieds.
Deadline Oct. 22=-
Published Oct. 28
(734) 764-0557
dailyclassified@gmail.com

Tired of South University Avenue?
Maybe you belong in the student
neighborhood north of the Diag.
By Jessica Vosgerchian
Magazine Editor.

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The pros and cons of Kerrytown

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ANN ARBOR

Choosing off-campus housing
is a lot more complicated than
just finding a place with enough
bedrooms at the right price. Your
address will decide where you're
most likely to party, what your
neighbors will be like and when
you'll be able to fall asleep at
night.
There are many student
enclaves in the residential area
around campus, but the most
obvious divide is the Diag. Most
student renters live south of South
University Avenue - in the area
affectionately deemed the stu-
dent ghetto. But a subset chooses
to split from the horde and settle
in the north near Kerrytown.
While the rental houses north
of Huron Street are often just as
run down, Kerrytown offers a
different way of life. Which side
should you choose?
HANGING WITH THE
NEIGHBORS
On any given Friday night, the
south side of campus seems to be
populated by shivering girls in
tiny dresses and boisterous dudes
in button-downs. In Kerrytown,

it's often difficult to determine
someone's gender from as close as
a block away. People are laid back,
but also politically correct. If you
say "that's gay" as a general insult,
rule out living on Catherine Street
immediately - that shit definitely
won't fly over there.
The Kerrytown social scene
is mellow, which can be good
and bad. Kerrytown house par-
ties don't pack in guests like sar-
dines. Nobody breaks glass in
the street or pukes in the kitchen
sink. There's room to move, and
very often, room to dance. Unlike
more macho gatherings to the
south, Kerrytown dance parties
are rarely short of willing partici-
pants.
But the question is how long
the party will last. Because of a
higher population of graduate
students and real adults, noise
complaints are a common occur-
rence. You might be glad of quiet,
older neighbors during the week,
or when you're sick or working on
a weekend night. But if you throw
a party, you have to be prepared to
talk to the cops.
Not everyone in Kerrytown is
an old fogy. Kerrytown's prox-

imity to North Campus makes it
attractivetostudents inthe School
of Music, Theatre and Dance. Cre-
ativity abounds between Huron
Street and Kingsley Street - look
forward to well-supplied potlucks
and musicians with actual talent.
But beware of music snobs who
try to play Animal Collective at a
dance party.
GOING OUT IN
KERRYTOWN
It's somewhat of a trek across
the Diag to South U, and Kerry-
towners aren't too keen on wait-
ing in line to get into a bar. So
instead of Rick's, BTB Cantina
and the Brown Jug, Kerrytown-
ers opt for Circus Bar, Aut Bar and
Arbor Brewing Company.
Circus Bar's Bluegrass Night
on Wednesday is a big draw for
the Kerrytown crowd - mostly
because of $1.25 cans of Pabst
Blue Ribbon and $2 Long Island
Iced Tea. The bands are incon-
sequential to the experience, but
occasionally there's a gem.
The onel bar techically is Ker-
rytown is Aut Bar, Ann Arbor's
main gay bar. Situated on Cath-

erine Street, Aut Bar consists of a
two-floor bar and a festive patio.
You can expect fun music and
questionable service. With mimo-
sas and bellinis galore, it's a great
brunch place as long as you have a
few hours to spend.
The Arbor Brewing Company
on Washington Street is the staple
watering hole for Kerrytown-
ers. It's chill, reliable and rarely
too crowded. You can almost
always find a table, even for big-
ger groups. And since ABC cards
at the bar, underage friends aren't
shut out from the gathering.
If you're looking to rage, you'll
want to stay near South U. But if
you're tired of standing in line for
45 minutes to get a drink, try your
luck up north.
FINDING FOOD
Kerrytown's biggest advantage
might be that it has two grocery
stores: Sparrow Meats and Pro-
duce and the People's Food Co-op.
And as any student living off-cam-
pus knows, eating at home can be
near impossible without regular
trips to grocery stores outside of
downtown.

ILLUSTRATION BY LAURA GARAVOGLIA
Between the two Kerrytown
stores, you can find most any
ingredient' you might need -
fresh produce, fancy cheeses or
free-range chicken. You might not
be able to find your guilty snack
food, and the emphasis on organic
and gourmet may make your gro-
cery bill higher than you like. But
buying eggs and milk at Campus
Corner is also not economical.
Kerrytown is also home to
the Ann Arbor Farmers Market,
which sells food from local pro-
ducers on Wednesday and Satur-
day mornings. The price is usually
right and you'll feel like a liberal
do-gooder.
A problem occurs around 2 a.m.
when the drunk munchies set in.
While South U. has myriad late-
night options, Kerrytown has a
lone Papa John's that is open until
3 a.m. on the weekend. The closest
options after that are Fleetwood
Diner and New York Pizza Depot,
which aren't really close at all.
The bottom line is if you're fine
living off of burritos and party
store pizza, don't move to Kerry-
town - homemade potluck meals
and organic produce will only
irritate you.

Tues., Oct. 27th 10am-6pm
Weds., Oct. 28th 10am-5pm S
FR EE A DMISSION C

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