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October 22, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-10-22

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MASKED POTENTIAL
Why Bryan Hogan could save
Michigan when it counts.
See Faceoff, Page 1C

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 22, 2009

michigandaily.com

AD Bill Martin announces retirement

In facilities and
finances, Martin
found his legacy

New search process a
chance to reshape job,
not just pick successor

By COURTNEY RATKOWIAK
Managing Editor
Fielding Yost, Michigan's first
athletic director, built Michigan
Stadium at a time when the idea of
seating 100,000 people in a "hole-
in-the-ground" stadium was seen
as unnecessary and unprecedented.
In convincing fashion, he proved
his dissenters wrong by attracting
a sellout crowd in the 1927 home
dedication game. The stadium cur-
rently remains the most prominent
symbol ofYost'sinfluence on Mich-
igan athletics.
Though Bill Martin - who
announced his retirement as ath-
letic director yesterday - didn't
have to build the stadium from
the ground up, the $226 million
Big House renovation project that
broke ground in 2007 is the epito-
me of what will likely be his last-

ing legacy.
With the Michigan Stadium
renovations almost complete and
the re-dedication ceremony sched-
uled for next year's football sea-
son opener, Martin announced his
Sept. 4, 2010 retirement in a letter
to University President Mary Sue
Coleman and during an Athletic
Department staff-wide meeting in
Cliff Keen Arena.
Martin, who championed the
role of a nearly autonomous ath-
letic director in a job where he
stayed much longer than he origi-
nally intended, will leave his mark
on Michigan athletics in a nearly
unparalleled fashion. His legacy
spans from quelling internal finan-
cial concerns to spearheading the
renovation and construction of
numerous athletic facilities.
In his letter to Coleman, Martin
See LEGACY, Page 3A

By KYLE SWANSON
Daily News Editor
Soon after Athletic Director Bill
Martin submitted a letter to Uni-
versity President Mary Sue Cole-
man announcing his retirement
effective next year and shared
the announcement with Athletic
Department staff in a department-
wide meeting yesterday, specula-
tion began over who would succeed
Martin as athletic director.
Though many names were
floated among members of the
University community yesterday,,
University executives have not yet'
released the names of any possible
replacements.
In a statement released yester-
day, Coleman wrote she would
manage the process of hiring anew
athletic director.
"I will personally oversee the
search for the next Athletic Direc-

tor with the help of a small advi-
sory group," Coleman wrote. "We
expect this process will take anum-
ber of months. With this advance
notice, we have the opportunity
to make a thoughtful and deliber-
ate choice and to manage a smooth
transition."
Similar to the process used
when Bill Martin was hired as ath-
letic director in 2000, the advisory
committee will recommend candi-
dates for Coleman's consideration,
though the final decision will be up
to the University president.
In an interview yesterday, Uni-
versity spokesman Rick Fitzgerald
said no one has been asked to serve
on the advisory committee yet.
Fitzgerald also said Coleman will
personally choose the committee
members.
Of the many names circulating
around the rumor mill, former Uni-
See SPECULATION, Page 7A

Athletic Director Bill Martin looks on at the Big House during the Wolverines'
upset of Ohio State in 2003. It was the100th rivalry match between U-M and

CHRONICLING MARTIN'S TENURE Newly constructed facilities* Renovated facilities* Notable coach hires
Tommy Amaker: Rich Maloney: Cheryl Burnett: Bob Bowman: Ross Academic John Beilein: Rich Rodriguez: Mike Bottom: Greg Ryan:
men's basketball baseball women's basketball men's swimming Center men's basketball football men's swimming women's soccer
2001-2007 2002-Present 2003-2007 2004-2008 2005 2007-present 2007-present 2008-present 2008-present

For the full listof coaching hires from
Bill Martin's tenure, go toour website
at michigandailycom

r -2001.--2002- 2003 -2004 -2005 2007 2008200 10
Yost Ice Arena Junge Family Kevin Borseth: Wilpon Baseball Al Glick Michigan Michigan Michigan
2001 Champions Center women's basketball and Softball Complex Field House Wrestling Center Stadium Soccer Stadium
Dates are for project's completion date. 2005 2007-present 2008 2009 (Projected: 2009) (Projected: 2010) (Projected: 2010)

S STUDYING OVERSEAS
'Despite losing top spot,'U'
still high in Fulbright awards
28 'U' students given TOP U.S. PRODUCERS OF FULBRIGHT STUDENTS:
prestigious State 200910
Department grants Type of Research Institution Number of Awards Number of Applicants

CAPTURING A POINT IN TIME

Northwestern University
By ALLIE WHITE University of Chicago
Daily StaffReporter Rmwn I niversit,

32
31
29
28

109
128
106
111
sOURCE: TheChronicleofNigherEducation

For the fifth year in a row, stu-
dents from the University have
been awarded upwards of 20 Ful-
bright Scholar Program grants.
A list of top U.S. producers of
Fulbright students for the 2009-
2010 academic year published by
the Chronicle of Higher Education
shows that of the University's 111
applicants to the U.S. Student Pro-
gram, 28 have thus far received and
accepted the grants.
Additionally, the University
ranked near the top in the Ful-
bright Scholar Program, with seven
faculty members receiving grants.
According to Amy Kehoe, Ful-
bright coordinator for the Univer-
sity, the names of the 2009-2010
recipients from the University have
yet to be released in print. They are
expected to be made public either
today or tomorrow.
Sponsored by the U.S. Depart-
ment of State, the Fulbright pro-
gram functions as an international
exchange program for students
and university professionals and
faculty, allowing them to conduct
researchundertake graduate study
and teach in schools globally.
Last year, 144 students - a record
high for the University - applied for
the Fulbright program, with a com-
bination of 31 undergraduate and
graduate students receiving grants.
The University has led the country

U. of Michigan at Ann Arbor

in Fulbright winners in three out of
the last five years.
Mark Tessler, director of the
University'sInternationalinstitute,
said that while it would be nice to
have the most grants every year, it's
not a realistic goal. He added that
despite the fact that the University
has fewer grant recipients this year,
it still remains a Fulbright power-
house.
"If we're three or four students
less this year, I don't think that's
really important," he said. "We're
really proud of the program and to
be in the company of these other
universities."
Leadingthe researchinstitutions
in recipients this year are North-
western University with 32 grants,
the University of Chicago with 31
and Brown University with 29.
Tessler noted that within the
top 10 institutions, the University
of Michigan is the only public uni-
versity.
"Everybody else on that list,
they are all private schools with a
very different funding base, a very
different student clientele," Tes-
sler said. "Our participation in the
Fulbright program is our pride and
joy."
Kehoe wrote in an e-mail that
she was delighted but not surprised

that the University received so
many awards.
"I did see the ranking and was
pleased to see that Michigan is yet
again a top-producing Fulbright
institution," she wrote.
University spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham wrote in an e-mail
that she was happy to see Universi-
ty students were once again among
the top grant winners.
"The University of Michigan is
gratified by the Fulbright Scholar-
ship program's continuing recog-
nition of the extraordinary caliber
of our students," she wrote in the
e-mail.
Applicants submit their applica-
tion materials in September for the
subsequent year, and recipients are
announced the following October.
In recent years, the Fulbright has
sent around 1,550 students and
1,250 scholars to over 155 coun-
tries, spendingclose to $275 million
annually in grant money.
According to Schuyler Allen,
senior program officer for the Ful-
bright Student Program Outreach
team, the University of Michigan
has produced 317 student recipi-
ents since 1993. Their areas of study
have ranged from public health to
music composition to East Asian
See FULBRIGHT, Page 3A

Kevin Dohrty, a senior at Greenhills High School, gets his senior photos taken by photographer John Shultz with the help of
Lauren Baker inside the Law Quad yesterday.
iew DPS program, victims
will soon be able to text in tips

Si
cal
Tex
chang
anothi
to elev
simple
The
initiat
Ina
later
Depar

ervice aimed at announce a new number, DPS 911
- or 377911 for Blackberry users -
tuations where that students, faculty and commu-
nity members can text to report a
is may be unsafe crime, specifically for situations
where making a phone call may be
By EMILY ORLEY unsafe.
Daily StaffReporter DPS Director Ken McGee wrote
in the statement that he hopes the
t messaging has completely new initiative will allow DPS offi-
ed the way people talk to one cers to take quicker action on a
er. But little has been done reported crime.
vate the technology beyond "Ultimately," McGee wrote,
communication purposes. "we hope crime can be reduced."
University is hoping a new DPS spokeswoman Diane
ive will change all that. Brown said that calling in to
statement set to be released reporta crime isstill the preferred
today, the University's method, but DPS will immediately
tment of Public Safety will respond to any text messages it

receives.
When a message is sent to the
number, an alarm will flash on
the computer screen of every on-
duty officer, and the text message
will show up on the screen, Brown
said. One officer then takes own-
ership of the message and begins a
text communication with the vic-
tim to find out more details of the
situation.
"Since the text messages need
to be short, we're hopeful our
community members will only use
the system for crimes or emergen-
cies in progress," McGee wrote in
the statement.
The initiative originally came
See TEXTING, Page 7A

WEATHER HI: 53
TOMORROW LU 47

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NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM INDEX NEWS .................................2A CLASSIFIEDS.....................6A
Video: Rich Rodriguez responds to Martin retiring. Vol. CXX, No. 31 OPINION ............................4 A THE B-SI DE.....B...................1 B
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTION/MULTIMEDIA @2009 The Michigan Daily SPORTS........... ....SA FACEOFF..................,.....,....1C
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