100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PORTS CULT(URE)
;s-to-riches mentality, club sports are
the fundamentals of competition.
-EMENT, INSIDE

r Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

michigandaily.com

CAPITALISM: A LOVE STORY

DONATION DIVIDENDS:
PART 3 OF A 5-PART SERIES
How the

'U' brings
in the big
money gifts

In his lecture "Capitalism Without Guilt: The Moral Case for Freedom," Yaron Brook, the president and executive director of The Ayn Rand institute, argued before a packed
crowd in the Chemistry Building that the government - not the failure of the free market - caused the nation's economic recession. For the full story, go to michigandaily.com.
CAMPUS DIVERSITY
'U' mulls gender-neutral housing

Spectrum Center,
ACLU team up to
back proposal
By VERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
The University prides itself
on its diverse student and fac-
ulty bodies, championing what
officials consider a friendly and
open environment for those of all
backgrounds. But when students
apply for housing before fresh-
man year, there is no box for gen-

der preference.
The housing application asks
incoming freshman if they want
to live in a substance-free room,
whether they want a single, dou-
ble or triple room and where they
prefer to live on campus. But there
is no option for transgender stu-
dents looking for gender-neutral
housing.
That may soon change.
The University is considering a
proposal that was initially pitched
by the Spectrum Center Student
Advisory Board to create a gen-
der-neutral housing option geared
toward transgender students.

The proposal has not been sig-
nificantly acted upon since it was
first introduced last April, but is
picking up new momentum with
help from the campus undergrad-
uate chapter of the American Civil
Liberties Union.
ACLU board member Ellen
Steele, an LSA sophomore, wrote
in an e-mail interview that the
group made the proposal in an
effort to make University resi-
dence halls more inclusive.
"Our ultimate goal would be
to make gender-neutral hous-
ing available to all students in all
dorms," Steele wrote. "Students of

different genders can already live
in the same hall. There is no rea-
son they shouldn't be able to live
in the same room."
And it appears that many uni-
versities across the country would
agree.
According to the website gen-
derblind.org, there are currently
36 colleges and universities with
gender-neutral housing options,
including several schools the
University considers to be its
peer institutions like Brown
University, Dartmouth College,
Harvard University and Stan-
See HOUSING, Page 3A

Building rights,
estate planning
among tools at
officials' disposal
By STEPHANIE STEINBERG
and KYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporters -
It's 10 a.m. and you can't find
your room key. After 10 minutes of
searching, you find it buried under
last week's laundry. You run out of
your dorm and make it to class just
in time to catch the last 15 minutes
of lecture. Having skipped break-
fast, you head to Mary Markley
Residence Hall to grab an early
lunch before you meet friends for
a study group at the library. After
hours of studying, you make your
way over to Hill Auditorium for a
concert.
In a typical day, students rush in
and out of the buildings that define
the character of campus - build-
ings that stand there because of
the University's major donors and
decision makers of yesteryear.
In fact, your residence hall was
named after Alice Lloyd, who was

the University's dean of women for
20 years. Stephen M. Ross paid for
part of the business school build-
ing where you arrived late to class.
Mary Markley Residence Hall,
where you ate lunch, was built in
honor of Mary Butler Markley,
who worked closely with alumni.
Your study group met in Hatcher-
Graduate Library, named in honor
of past University President Har-
lan H. Hatcher. You ended your
day with a concert at Hill Audito-
rium, which was built with money
bequeathed by former University
Regent Arthur Hill.
However, it isn't by chance that
every building you visited today
was named after an individual. In
fact, almost every building across
campus has been named in honor
of a prominent Universityleader or
a generous donor.
NAMING RIGHTS
The staff at the Office of Devel-
opment determines building and
program names following a very
specific set of procedures that dic-
tate who can name facilities and
the individualfor whom they can
be named.
See SERIES, Page 3A

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
At weekly meeting,
MSA officials debate
community concerns

A WILD ADVERTISEMENT

ALMA MATTERS
Alumni plates, a
boost in profit,
pride for the 'U'

After history of
disruptions,
assembly considers
restricting speakers
By MALLORY JONES
Daily StaffReporter
Last night, the Michigan Stu-
dentAssemblydiscussed aresolu-
tion that, if passed, would revamp
the way community members are
allowed to address the assembly.
In the past, the "community
concerns" portion of the agenda
has been known to take up long
stretches ofmeetingtime.
In the last two semesters, MSA
meeting agendas were routinely
derailed during the community
concerns portion of the evening
by local activists promoting their
side of issues sometimes not
directly related to campus affairs.
Michael Benson, chair of the
Rules and Elections committee,
authored the resolution along
with Student General Counsel
Jim Brusstar. Benson said there
were more problems with the
community concerns time last
. year than this semester.

"When people are coming in
speaking to things that MSA has
no control over, or that MSA can-
not affect, it's a waste of time,"
Benson said.
The resolution would shorten
the time allotted to each speaker
from five minutes to three min-
utes.
It would also require speak-
ers to present a valid, unexpired
MCard. Those without a Univer-
sity affiliation would be able to
apply for time with MSA execu-
tives at least two business days in
advance.
Benson said the assembly
"wants to remain open." He said
the resolution is not intended to
discourage community members
from coming to speak.
But some representatives are
wary of the resolution's implica-
tions.
Public Heath Rep. Hamdan
Yousuf expressed concerns over
limiting the rights of community.
members tospeak duringthegen-
eral meetings.
"I don't think any democratic
body can say give me your valid,
unexpired MCard if you want to
speak," he said. "We don't need to
have all of these crazy rules about
See MSA, Page 3A

Sin
net
Uni
On
school
Tho
showir
es of I
raised
the Ur
other s
In
progra
al, one
the an
state
makes
the u
$25 fr,
direct]
the pla
Foll
ment,c
vehicle
additi
goes

ice 2000, $3.2M featured on the plate.
Each campus of the University
ted for all three of Michigan offers unique license
plates for their supporters.
versity campuses Between all three campuses,
there are a total of 245,331 Uni-
By ALLIE WHITE versity license plates on the road,
For the Daily which has translated into $3.2
million in revenue for the Univer-
Michigan license plates, sity since the program began in
pride goes a long way. 2000, according to Kelly Chesney,
se alumni license plates spokeswoman for Secretary of
ng the collegiate allegianc- State Terri Lynn Land.
Michigan's motorists have With roughly 9 million plated
some serious money for vehicles in Michigan, the Univer-
niversity of Michigan and sity of Michigan is represented
chools in the state. on almost 3 percent of all cars in
Michigan, drivers in the the state.
m must pay an addition- Last year alone, the Univer-
-time fee of $35 on top of sity of Michigan received around
tnual registration fee the $381,000 in revenue from the
requires. While the state plates, according to Cynthia Wil-
no additional money from banks, vice president for govern-
niversity plate program, ment relations at the University.
om the additional fee goes The target of those funds is
ly to the school featured on left up to the discretion of each
tte. school.
owing that initial pay- At the University, the money
drivers must pay the state's has, been routed to University-
e registration fee plus an affiliated outreach activities.
anal $10 each year, which The revenue contributed to
directly to the university See LICENSE PLATES, Page 3A

MIARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily
Jared Hawkley, an intern for campus non-profit group 826michigansdirects movie-
goers into the Michigan Theatre last night to see a sneak peek of the new film
"Where the Wild Things Are" based on the book of the same name.

WEATHER HI: 61
TOMORROW LO: 52

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and letus know.

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Hoops squads look forward to "Michigan Madness"
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE GAME

INDEX NEW S ................2..............2A CLASSIFIEDS ...................... 6A
Vol. CXX, No. 22 OPINION ..A SPORT ......-... .............7A
©2009TheMichigan Daily ART ......................... A T STAT M NT ............
@209chr e MilychR S.................. A T ES A E E T ........1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan