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September 15, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-09-15

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NEED FOR SPEED
Michigan players from Texas
year's best albums -but and Florida debate whose
u'll need Prozac for. home state has faster feet.
ARTS, PAGE 5 SEE SPORTS, PAGE 8
F1jEffillianwail

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

VISITING CAMPUS
How 'U',
protects
big names
When dignitaries visit Ann
Arbor, several agencies work
together to make sure
everything goes smoothly
By TORREY ARMSTRONG
Daily StaffReporter
When U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John
Roberts and his entourage entered a Law School
classroom Thursday afternoon, many in the room
thought the Secret Service had just walked in.
They were close, but wrong.
The "big men in suits," as one student reported,
were U.S. Marshals - federal law enforcement
agents within the Department of Justice who pro-
tect court officers and "ensure the safe and secure
conduct of judicial proceedings," according to the
agency's website.
And like the Secret Service, the U.S. Marshals
are one of several federal, state and local security
forces the University works closely with when a
high-profile visitor comes to campus.
Department of Public Safety spokeswoman
Diane Brown said -handling high-profile figures
like Chief Justice Roberts entails precise coordina-
tion of various law enforcement entities, like the
Secret Service and U.S. Marshals, as well as DPS,
state and local police, personal security and public
relations staff.
"Marshals, State Department officials, DPS offi-
cers - each group has different responsibilities,"
Brown said. "Sometimes they're responsible for
a particular geographic area, or a certain type of
crime."
While reducing the number of unplanned visits
and limiting the volatility of the visitor's activities
are among law enforcement's top priorities, Brown
said things go awry more often with lower-profile
See SECURITY, Page 2

FEASTIVITIES

UNIVERSITY BOARD OF REGENTS
Regents to
handle $44M
in proposals
Campus safety, REGENTIAL MATH
sports facility $9 MILLION
ELECTRONIC LOCKS
designs on to-do list $1.5 MILLION
By KYLE SWANSON GERIATRICS CENTER RENOVATIONS
Daily News Editor $4 MILLION
UNVERSITY HOSPITAL POWER SYSTEM
At its monthly meeting Thurs-
day, the University Board of $23.2 MILIN
Regents will take action on $43.7 CRISLER ARENA SCHEMATICS
million worth of campus con-
struction and renovations affect- +"O ILO
ing everything from campus SOCCER FIELD
safety to sports facilities to the $437 MILLION
University Hospital .TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE CONSIDERED

Among the items on their
plate, the regents will consider
two upgrades to campus medical
facilities, two recommendations
to alter planned Athletic Depart-
ment projects and a new proposal
to upgrade the locks on doors of
campus buildings.
Timothy Slottow, the Univer-
sity's executive vice president
and chief financial officer, will
recommend upgrading manually
locking exterior doors with elec-
tronic readers that would lock
and unlock the doors.
The proposal, outlined in a
memo released yesterday, would
include replacing traditional key
locks on exterior doors at more
than100 buildings on campus and
issuingnew, more technologically
advanced MCards to all members
of the campus community.
Upgrading the locks would

allow campus officials to better
respond to emergency situations
in which a building lockdown
may be necessary because the
doors could be locked from a cen-
tral point.
The project is expected to
cost $9 million and is scheduled
for completion by spring 2011. If
approved, representatives from
the University's Department of
Architecture, Engineering and
Construction will design the proj-
ect.
Slottow and Dr. Ora Pescovitz,
executive vice president for medi-
cal affairs, will seek approval
from the regents for two new
projects at University Hospital.
The regents will be asked for
approval of a renovation to the East
Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics
See REGENTS, Page 7

The Muslim Students' Association hosted a free dinner in celebration of Ramadan last night at Rackham.

MSA, faculty to teamup
MIPs, trash citations
and smoking ban
on the table
By STEPHANIE STEINBERG
Daily StaffReporter
In a robust discussion of the
issues facing campus - including.
trash violations on Football Satur-
days, revising the Student Code of
Conduct and the safety of Minor
in Possession citations - student
leaders and the top faculty govern-
ing board promised to work togeth-
er to find solutions.
Michigan Student Assembly
President Abhishek Mahanti and
Vice President Mike Rorro visited
the Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs weekly meeting
to raise their concerns and illicit
faculty help.
"Just us being here we realize
that we've got friends," Mahanti~
said. "That's a really reassuring
thing."
The two sides offered to help
each other accomplish their goals
that included revising the Student
Code of Conduct to make it more
practical, using Ann Arbor and
University Police more effectively JED MoCH/Oaily
to protect students from crimes MSA President Abhishek Mahanti meets with the faculty's leading body yesterday.
and avoiding possible fallout from and SACUA collaborate to revise to the statement. The addition
a new smoke-free initiative taking the Statement of Student Rights would solve some of the problems
effect in 2011. and Responsibilities, or the Student students encounter when a party
Code of Conduct - which is meant goes awry, like refusing to call for
MAKING STUDENT DRINKING to govern student behavior on cam- help for friends who pass out from
POLICY MORE PRACTICAL pus. drinking for fear of repercussions
This year, MSA is working on for themselves.
Once every three years, MSA adding a "Good Samaritan Policy" See SACUA, Page 7

Natural History Museum to
put away controversial exhibit

Native American
display to come
down in Jan. 2010
By JASMINE ZHU
Daily StaffReporter
The University Museum of Nat-
uralHistory'scontroversialNative
American Diorama exhibit will be
taken off display starting in 2010,
pleasing those who have, for years,
argued that the displays are inac-
curate and overly simplistic.
The exhibit places three-
dimensional depictions of Native
American life alongside fossils of
dinosaurs and other prehistoric
creatures as well as stuffed birds
illustrating Michigan's vast wild-
life.
"Both Native and non-Native
visitors have spoken out eloquent-
ly" against the exhibit, according
to a press release announcing the
closure.
In the press release, Museum
of Natural History officials wrote
that "Museums around the world
are wrestling with questions
about the representation of indig-
enous people in museum exhib-
its. Who decides how a culture is
portrayed? Does context matter?
What happens when members of
the community speak out against
museum exhibits?"
To answer some of these ques-
tions, the museum is creating

JED MOCH/Daily
LSA sophomore Sarah Rabinowe looks at Native American diorama exhibit.

an overlay exhibit titled "Native
American Dioramas in Transi-
tion," which, the press release says,
will explain why the dioramas are
being taken down and moved into
storage.
"Scholarship and museum
practices have changed since
the dioramas were made almost
50 years ago," the press release
reads. "Issues of concern include
their context in a natural history
museum and the stereotyping
and oversimplification inherent
in the diorama as a display tech-
nique."
The call to take down the
exhibit ultimately fell on the
shoulders of the museum's direc-

tor Amy Harris with the support
of LSA Dean Terry McDonald and
the faculty in the Native American
Studies Program as well as advice
from the Native American Advi-
sory Committee. But the move
will not take place until the end of
LSA's current theme year, called
"Meaningful Objects: Museums in
the Academy."
"I decided to wait to remove
the dioramas until the 2009-10
LSA Museums Theme Year, so
that there would be many oppor-
tunities for our audiences to learn
about the issues of concern," Har-
ris wrote in an e-mail interview
with the Daily.
See EXHIBIT, Page 7

WEATHER H i. 71
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INDEX NEWS ................................2 ARTS- ... . . .........5
Vol. CXX,No.6 AP NEWS .......................... 3 CLASSIFIEDS ...................... 6
©2d9heMichianO aily OPINION ............................4 SPORTS..............................8

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