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April 20, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-04-20

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DISNEY DISASTER"
Miley Cyrus made a movie. It's just as
amateurish and pointless as her show.
SEE ARTS, PAGE 5A

SECOND NEVER FELT SO GOOD
At this weekend's NCAAs, the Wolverines
shocked the field and took home second place.
U SEE SPORTSMONDAY, INSIDE

my id i an Batl;.
)NE H17 'UNDR SED r { 1N1.NETEEN 1 Tft t jy TYEARS OF ,(EDI, S T RIA 1.FREEDOM

Ann Arbor Michigan

Monday, April 20,2009

michigandailv.com

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DUNKIN' ON THE DIAG

A SECOND TRANSITION
For transfer
students, a
struggle on
N. Campus

SAID ALSALAH/Dsly
LSA senior David Dennis tries to dunk Michigan hockey defenseman Tristin Llewellyn on the Diag on Friday. The dunk tank was part of a charity event sponsored by
Sigma Chi that raised money to purchase school supplies for underprivileged children in the Dominican Republic.
THE END OF AN INDUSTRY?
After a newspap er collapse

For tough transition,
76 percent of transfer
students placed on
North Campus
ByVERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
When LSA sophomore Lauren
Mosena transferred to the Uni-
versity of Michigan from Pitzer
College in Claremont, Calif. in the
fall, she had two major challenges
ahead of her.
° Not only did she have to struggle
through Michigan's harsh winters,
but she also had to adjust to a com-
pletely new university - with new
professors, new classes and, hope-
fully, new friends. But because
she was placed on North Campus,
Mosena said that those were more
difficult tasks.
"It has been extremely hard to
meet people around me in North-
wood," Mosena said. "Everyone
who lives up here already has their
life here at Michigan figured out
and aren't necessarily looking for
new friends - alot of them keep to
themselves."
And Mosena's experience is not

an isolated one.
According to figures obtainedby
The Michigan Daily from Univer-
sity Housing, 76 percent of trans-
fer students for the fall 2008 term
- 199 of the 262 students - were
placed on North Campus in either
Bursley Hall, Baits I and II or the
Northwood Community Apart-
ments.- And of -those students, 91
percent - or 181 - lived in North-
wood.
University Housing Spokesman
Peter Logan said this trend is due
to the fact that the kitchen and
apartment-style living that North-
wood offers is appealing to older
students, and also that many trans-
fer students request it.
But Logan said the decision
is ultimately dictated by space.
Because the University is respon-
sible for supplying housing for
first-year and returning students,
transfer students aren't always
placed in ideal locations, he said.
"Transfer students are placed
where space is available in Uni-
versity Housing facilities that they
have requested or would be appro-
priate to their age and university
experience," Logan said. "We can't
always give a transfer student a
placement that they prefer, but we
See TRANSFER, Page 3A

p What becomes of a
community when its
local paper closes?
By CHRIS HERRING
Daily StaffReporter
When it became known late last
month that Ann Arbor's primary
daily newspaper, The Ann Arbor
News, would be closing its doors
in July, the obvious question fol-

lowed: Who's going to provide
local news content for the area?
And with dozens of papers hav-
ing closed since the start of the
year, it's a question that's being
asked across the country. At best,
the print newspaper industry is.
in a state of flux. At worst, it's in a
state of emergency.
To reduce costs, the Detroit
Free Press and The Detroit News
just scaled back home delivery to
three days a week. In the last two
months, two big-city dailies, the

Rocky Mountain News in Denver
and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer,
have closed and gone exclusively
online. The San Francisco Chroni-
cle and The Boston Globe have also
recentlyreceived threatsofclosure
from their parent companies.
Understandably, the fate of
major papers and their respective
cities has been the primary topic
of discussion when it comes to the
future of the industry. But little
has been said about how smaller
cities like Ann Arbor - and even

smaller towns -are being affected
when they lose their main source
of news.
In many cases, industry experts
and newspaper veterans say, small
communities have much more to
lose than major cities when their
primary newspapers fold. With
no apparent outlets to plug the
news holes left behind, residents
of small and mid-sized towns
are more likely to be uninformed
about the developments taking
See NEWSPAPER, Page 7A

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION
A look inside how
the 'U' formulates
its' annual budget.

CAMPUS SOCIETIES
Order of Angell releases list of 2010 members

University officials
discuss how they
finalize the budget
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporter
The University's budget is mas-
sive, to say the least. With totals of
more than $5.2 billion in operating
revenues and expenses at the Uni-
versity's three campuses, including
the University of Michigan Health
System and the Athletic Depart-
ment, it's easy to see why devel-
oping the University's budget is
almost a year-long process.
Despite the budget's enormity
and vast importance for life at the
University, very little about its for-
mulation is known to many mem-
bers of the University community.
Over the past two months, through
several interviews, University
President Mary Sue Coleman,
Provost Teresa Sullivan and Phil
Hanlon, vice provost for academic
and budgetary affairs, have offered
insight onto this rarely discussed
process.
The University's budget plan-
ning begins in the fall of the previ-
ous academic year. Upon direction
from the office of the Provost, the
dean of each of the University's
schools and vice presidents of each
executive office begin formulating

budget recommendations for their
respective units.
In an interview last month, Cole-
man said deans and vice presidents
are directed each year to look for
ways to cut costs.
"We understand that we're
going to have to take between land
2 percent out," she said. "We're just
goingto have to cut."
Coleman said the cuts proposed
must impact the quality of edu -
cation at the University as little
as possible, so as not to harm the
experience students receive on
campus.
In an interview last month, Sul-
livan said in addition to the cuts,
deans and vice presidents are
asked to reallocate an additional 1,
to 2 percent from low priorities to
higher priorities - to put emphasis.
on each unit's bigger goals. Once
this has been done and the propos-
als are completed, the budget rec--
ommendations are then reviewed
in budget conferences with the
provost.
In that March interview, Sul-
livan said this year's budget con-,
ferences began in January and
were expected to finish near the
end of March. She explained that
the budget conferences provide
an opportunity for deans and vice
presidents to present their budgets
and justify the amount of money
they're requesting.
See BUDGET, Page 7A

Group includes 22
leaders of campus
organizations, teams
By EMILY ORLEY
Daily StaffReporter
Most students are fairly famil-
iar with the many clubs on campus
that comprise "the leaders and the
best" of the University. However
there is one club made up of prom-
inent leaders on campus that pre-
fers to work in silence.
Order of Angell, the senior honor

society started by and named after
former University president James
Burrill Angell, announced its new-
est class, "Pride of 2010," to The
Michigan Daily on Saturday.
Every year, a new group of
prominent organization leaders,
sports captains and influential
Greek representatives are select-
ed, or "tapped" by the outgoing
class to join the club and continue
its mission.
"It is an organization to advance
exceptional leadership through a
lifelong loyalty to and engagement
with the University of Michigan,"
See ORDER, Page 3A

2010 ORDER OF ANGELL CL
Ashley Sauer: Women's Golf
Christopher Brady: Men's Swimming and
Diving
Pascal Carole:National Societyof Black
Engineers
David-Jonathan Chan: Men's Gymnastics
AndrewDalack:StudentsAlliedfor Freedom
and Equality
John Federspiel: Solar Car Team
Alisa Goldman:lDance Marathon
rSashaGribov:TAMID IsraelInvestmentGroup
Julia Hawley: Solar Car Team
AnujLal:IndianAmerican Student Association
Mike Michelon: MUSKET
Salimah Mohamed:Ypsilanti HealthlInitiative

David Moosman: Football
Meha Pandey: Society of Women Engineers
AriParritm:Inter-Fraternity Council
Scott Roffman: Men's Glee ub
Fiona Ruddy: Human Rights Through
Education
Michael Sears: Wrestling
Frank Shotwell:Men's Track and Field
Katy Wallander: Blood DriveslUnited
Jason Waller:Army ROTC
LaurenWashington:NationalPan-Hellenic
Council
Honorary Member David Brandon: Chair
man and CEO of Domino's Pizza
SOURCE:Order of Angell

CR IM E FORKING OVER YOUR MONEY
Kappa Sigma vandalized
by intoxicated student

By TREVOR CALERO
Daily StaffReporter
Ann Arbor police officers
responded to a call at a fraternity
house early Friday morning after
-a 20-year-old University student
reportedly smashed multiple
windows in the front of the house,
an Ann Arbor Police Department
official said.
Sgt. Andrew Zazula said when'
the officers arrived at the Kappa
Sigma fraternity at 806 Hill St. at
around 2 a.m. they found a front
glass door shattered and broken
windows on the front and side of
the house.
"The student said somebody
from that residence was giving
him a problem earlier," Zazula

said.
Kappa Sigma President Greg
Carmody said he was in-his room
with a couple of friends when he
learned of the vandal's presence
at the front of the house.
"Someone comes in my room
and says that someone is outside
with a metal pipe," Carmody said.
"I went downstairs and was try-
ing to calm him down and at this
point he started going off on me.
He was just in a state of uncon-
trollable rage."
The man, who was apparently
drunk, claimed that someone
from the fraternity had been yell-
ing at him from across the street,
Carmody said.
Carmody said after the man
See CRIME, Page 7A

SAID ALSALAH/Daily
LSA freshman Sari Krumholz replaces a fork with a quarter on the Diagon Saturday
as part of a programto raise money for Washtenaw County's 3,000 homeless.

WEATHER HI:50 GOTANEWSTIP? NEWONMICHIGANDAILY.COM INDEX NEWS...............................2A SUDOKU.............-.-...-.5A
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