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March 27, 2009 - Image 7

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0 The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Friday, March 27, 2009 - 7

p The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Friday, March 27, 2009 - 7

WANT TO MAKE FLASH
GRAPHICS FOR THE DAILY
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At event today, Pandora founder
to discuss his company's success

Westergren will
speak on North
Campus at 3:30 p.m.
By JOHN A. WEISS, JR.
Daily StaffReporter
The founder of the well-known
and often-used Internet radio ser-
vice Pandora will discuss the music
resource's development and inno-
vative business model on campus
today.
MPowered, the University's stu-
d in noip nniiz.

the michigan daily

Pandora, a free online radio
website, makes use of the Music
Genome Project to tailor custom
playlists based on users' preferenc-
es like favorite song or artist. It also
highlights lesser-known artists by
playing songs with similar attri-
butes to users' favorites.
Westergren will be speaking at
3:30 p.m. in Stamps Auditorium on
North Campus. A reception open to
the public will follow.
The event is part of a confer-
ence for Entreprelliance, a national
entrepreneurship organization of
which MPowered is a member.
It also will double as MPowered's
Entrepreneurship Hour for the
week, a one-credit seminar course

in the College of Engineering that
exposes students from across cam-
pus to a variety of business leaders
and innovators.
This is the fifth annual Entreprel-
liance Conference, the yearly con-
vention for an organization that
recognizes 40 top entrepreneurial
universities as members. It is the
first time it has been held outside
of the East Coast, said Engineering
senior Michelle Cheng, president of
MPowered.
The weekend long event will also
feature two other speakers, Joseph
Williams and Josh Linkner.
Engineering senior Andry Supi-
an, Vice President of MPowered,
said the three speakers each rep-

resent different types of entrepre-
neurship.
Supian described Williams as a
"social entrepreneur." He founded
New Communities Creation Out-
reach, an organization that works
to integrate former prisoners back
into society.
Linker is the founder and CEO of
ePrize, a company that helps other
companies transition from tradi-
tional advertisements to online
marketing.
Supian said that Westergren's
message, and the message of the
entire conference, fits with the
group's mission to expose students
to entrepreneurship and to support
student ventures.

help wanted
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ANN ARBOR BASED company,
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ATHLETIC FEMALE STUDENTS
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PARTICIPANTS FOR A psychology
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CANCER RESEARCH SUMMER
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
(CaRSIP)
As part of its Cancer Biology Training
Program, the University of Michigan
Comprehensive Cancer Center, in part
with funding from the National Insti-
tutes of Health (NIH) is providing expo-
sure to cancer research for highly moti-
vated and talented college undergradu-
ates. This program will give the suc-
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plore potential careers in the field of
cancer. Interns are paid a stipend of
$4,500 for ten weeks during the sum-
mer and are aimed at students who are
completing their sophomore or junior
undergraduate year this spring. In
keeping with the terms of the NIH
grant, we especially encourage applica-
tions from individuals from minority
groups that are currently underrepre-
sented in biomedical and behavioral
research.
The deadline for application is 17 April
2009. Your application must be up-
loaded at the following site:
http://www.cancermed. umich. edulpro-
fessionals/summer internship.shtml
Questions about the program? Please
email La Cheryl Wicker at
lwicker(l&umich.edu
2009 SUMMER/FALL INTERNSHIP
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cent entrepren
tion, is hostin;
Tim Westergrer
MSA
From Page 1

neursdpporganza-
ig Pandora founder
sn.

hired will add links to useful sites
for students like like the AirBus
pages, ratemyprofessors.com and
inexpensive textbooks on Amazon.
com to the website, Mahanti said.
Mahantisaidthe website willalso
feature ways for students to contrib-
ute to and find out more about MSA.
There are plans to regularly upload
the budget, meeting minutes, agen-
das and resolutions to the page.
Students will also be able to log
in through their Facebook accounts
to comment on a new MSA blog.
Mahanti said the website changes
would help improve MSA's relation-
ship with students and would make
the assembly more transparent.
"By starting with a new website,
with documents, minutes, proposals,
resolutions, budget stuff, everything
and anything," he said, "having that
there from the get-go is going to real-
ly help us on that path."
In addition to revamping the
website's design, Mahanti and
Rorro also want to use it to pro-
mote and expand resources like
the Blue Hiring Blue program,
which helps students get jobs and
internships. They also plan to hold
a five-day job week, during which
MSA would bring in student orga-
nizations and representatives from
the Career Center and companies
to hold resume workshops, mock
interviews, information sessions
and forums.
The pair also has plans in the
works to help foster stronger rela-
tionships between MSA and stu-
dent organizations by matching up
interested student groups with an
MSA representative. The represen-
tatives would meet with their des-
ignated student organizations on
abi-weeklormonthl hais and

would attend some of their events.
"It's just sort of a way to devel-
op a closer connection to MSA, to
show that we can actually help
(student organizations) out," Rorro
said, "We want to help out student
groups with anything at all, not
just funding."
Additionally, Rorro said he and
Mahanti want to make funding an
easier process in itself by holding
workshops to teach student orga-
nizations how to fill out funding
applications.
Mahanti said that he and Rorro
also want to reach out to the stu-
dent body at large by holding
office hours outside of MSA's loca-
tion in the Michigan Union, like
on the Diag and in Mason Hall.
MSA representatives are already
required to hold one office hour a
week, but Mahanti said students
don't typically take advantage
of them because they aren't well
publicized and aren't held in con-
venient locations.
"Outreach is really hard. People
don't like to look at signs. They
don't like to talk on the Diag, so
it's inherently a difficult problem,"
Mahanti said. "But we've been
doing our best with the campaign
and moving forward to make sure
we're out there as much as possible
without annoying people."
While Mahanti and Rorro said
they plan to tackle larger goals like
tuition and helping students find jobs,
theywanttotakeimmediateactionto
focus on more attainable goals.
"MSA is a series of small victo-
ries, and I think that if we go into
the year looking at it like that, and
if we start having these small vic-
tories, then next year maybe we
can have bigger victories," Mah-
anti said. "But I think right now
we can look at these small things
and deliver on them, and then
hush forward."

College cost group
endorses Obama's
budget proposal

Group says increased
Pell Grant funding
will ease burden on
students' families
By MALLORY JONES
Daily StaffReporter
Representatives from the
Campaign for College Afford-
ability issued a report yesterday
explaining the group's support
for President Barack Obama's
budget proposal, which, if
passed, would increase direct
federal financial aid to stu-
dents.
In a conference call with
reporters yesterday Christine
Lindstrom, director of the U.S.
Public Interest Research Group's
Higher Education Program, and
a member of the Campaign for
College Affordability said the
federal student aid program
requires dramatic reconstruc-
tion.
"This is a stepping stone. The
Obama budget takes into con-
sideration that this is an initial
investment," Lindstrom said.
"More needs tobe done."
Obama's budget proposal calls
for an end to the Federal Family
Education Loan Program, which
provides subsides to banks that
loan to students. Instead, all
federal student loans would be
issued through the Department
of Education's Direct Loan Pro-
gram, according to the report,
Obama's Budget: Supporting
Students, Not Banks.
The Department of Educa-
tion predicts an increase of
$5 billion to the Federal Pell
Grant Program in the 2010-
2011 school year, taken directly
from money previously given to
banks.
In Michigan, 181,767 students
received Pell Grants. Obama's
proposal would provide for
an additional 9,172 recipients

in Michigan and increase the
average total awarded by $114,
according to research by U.S.
PIRG.
In 1977, the Pell Grant covered
77 percent of the total cost of
college for low-income students
according to research by U.S.
PIRG. Today, the grant covers 35
percent of the total costs.
Obama's proposal attempts
to safeguard the program from
falling behind the rising costs of
tuition, Lindstrom said. She said
she thinks the change will allow
the grant to stay useful for years
to come.
"Specifically, the budget actu-
ally proposes indexing (the Pell)
grant to inflation so it increases
by inflation plus one each year
after," Lindstrom said. "That's
currently not how the Pell Grant
works and that will help the Pell
Grant stay viable."
The average tuition for a four-
year public university in Michi-
gan increased by 11 percent
between the 2006-2007 to the
2007-2008 school years.
In the report, Campaign for
College Affordability officials
also expressed their support
for programs to help students
who have graduated repay their
debt.
Robert Brandon, of the
Campaign for College Afford-
ability, said on the conference
call that high debt discourages
college graduates from enter-
ing typically lower-paying, yet
extremely important career
fields like teaching and social
work.
Brandon said increasing pro-
grams to help students who have
graduated repay their debt, like
the Income-Based Repayment
Program, which will allow stu-
dents to pay back only as much
as they can afford according to
their income, will help to open
up opportunities for graduates.
The Department of Education
will implement this program
starting July 1.

For Saturday, March 28, 2009
ARIES
(March 21 toApril 19)
What a different day from yesterday!
You're charming, diplomatic and
smooth. People enjoy talking to you, and
vice versa. Enjoy your day!
TAURUS
(April 20to May 20)
Any kind of research you do today
might make money for you now or in the
future. Solitude in beautiful surround-
ings will please you. It's a good day for
meditation or quiet contemplation.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Conversations with artistic and cre-
ative people will please you today. You
feel you're in the mix of things, and you
love it. You're also more optimistic
about your future.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Some of you might develop a crush on
your boss today or someone older, richer
or more influential. People look upon
you today with very favorable eyes.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is the perfect day to make plans
to travel somewhere for pleasure.
Discussions about publishing, the media,
medicine and the law will go well. Enjoy
beauty in your surroundings.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
This is a good day to discuss shared
property. Try to mend broken fences or
bad feelings that might've been created
yesterday.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 toOct. 22)
Relations with partners and close
friends can be smoothed over today. You
easily have warm feelings for others, and
they do for you as well. Tell someone
how much you care.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Co-workers are unusually helpful and
supportive today. All discussions related
to your job will foster good feelings as
well as promote future earnings.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
All creative ventures will go well
today. This is a lovely day to schmooze
and enjoy romantic flirtations. Have a
party if you can! Playful activities with
children will be enjoyable.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Family discussions are warm and
friendly today. Your ideas about home
repairs will be creative, and probably
end up with an attractive result. It's a
good day to discuss real estate.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
You can make money from your com-
munications today. This is an excellent
day to teach, act, write, market, sell or
verbally influence others in any way.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
This is a good day for business and
commerce. Financial discussions can go
well. Trust your moneymaking ideas.
You'll enjoy shopping for beautiful
things for yourself and loved ones.
YOU BORN TODAY You have a
bright, enthusiastic personality that
lights up any room. Your charm has a
sort of innocence. (People like you.)
Some of you are extroverted and outgo-
ing, and some of you are not; all of you
are independent! Your success depends
on hard work and commitment, which
you have in abundance. Your year ahead
is wonderfully social with a strong focus
on relationships.
Birthdate of: Vince Vaughn, actor;
Reba McEntire, singer/actress; Chris
Barrie, actor.

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