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March 25, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-25

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Ann Arbor, Michigan
RUNNING A BUSINESS RIGHT
Ross won't
up focus on
ethcsyet
Critics push for revitalized
ethics effort in business schools
after greed helped worsen
the nation's financial crisis
By MALLORY JONES
and DEVON THORSBY
Daily Staff Reporters
As the Federal government bails out many of the
nation's companies and financial institutions, ques-
tions have arisen about the integrity of the people
leading American businesses. In the face of these calls
for a change in the way business operates, the Ross
School of Business is altering the way it teaches its
future business leaders.
An article published in The New York Times on
March 5 suggested business schools nationwide are
adjusting their curricula to instill better business val-
ues in their students. The Ross School of Business is
among these schools, according to professors and stu-
dents in the school.
But while school officials say the downturn is often
discussed in Business School classrooms, they report
that there are no immediate plan's to alter the schools
curricula.
Valerie Suslow, associate dean for degree pro-
grams at the Business School, said the school has
always tried to promote ethical business practices to
its students. According to Suslow, the school has con-
sistently focused on teaching the implications of man-
agement decisions.
"The best business schools are serious about instill-
ing a sense of responsibility and ethics," Suslow said.
"But in the real world, unfortunately, there are some-
times tremendous financial and social incentives that
can work against what we have tried to instill as good
leadership practices."
Suslow said because the events surrounding the
current financial crisis are still unfolding, no new
courses have been created specifically on the topic.
Butwhile no concrete changes have taken place, Sus-
See BUSINESS ETHICS, Page 7A

Wednesday, March 25,2009_michigandailycom
PACKED (ART) HOUSE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM
UMHS foots
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As
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Michi
ous p
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In

i poor economy, charity care, hospitals are re-
examiningthe waysinwhichthey
harity care has can continue to care for patients
in emergency situations, regard-
nped 93 percent less of the patient's insurance sta-
tus, which they are required to do
'U in two years per a 1986 federal law.
Helen Levy, research assis-
By EMILY ORLEY tant professor at the University's
Daily StaffReporter Institute for Social Research, said
the state's compounding unem-
ing a 93 percent increase in ployment problems have put a
health care costs to people significant strain on Michigan's
annot afford insurance, the hospitals.
rsity of Michigan Health "Because of the recession,
to is being forced to take fewer people can pay for health
er look at the way they do care services that they need, so
ess, according to hospital hospitals will have to provide
als. more uncompensated care," Levy
e health system - which said.
des care to more than According to the Center for
00 patients per year - spent Healthcare Research & Trans-
million of uncompensated formation, from 2006 to 2007, the
n fiscal year 2008 - almost number of Michigan residents
e the $88 million it spent in who didn't have health insurance
year 2006. increased from 10.5 percent to
tile the national economy 11.6 percent of Michigan's total
sly experienced a downward population.
since last fall, Michigan's The increase inuninsured resi-
my has been suffering for dents has forced the University
weighed down by the fledg- health system to reorganize their
uto industry and the nation's priorities, said Shantell Kirkend-
unemployment rate - now oll, senior public relations repre-
than 11 percent according to sentative for University Hospital.
)epartment of Labor. "We are absorbing the cost of
the state's economy wors- charity care and bad debt as part
he combination of benefit of our overall budget planning,"
and layoffs has left many Kirkendoll said.
igan residents on the peril- In addition to the $170 million
lateau of being too young of uncompensated direct patient
alify for Medicare and too care, Doug Strong, director and
hy to qualify for Medicaid. chief executive officer of the Uni-
the wake of this boom in See HOSPITAL, Page 7A

Students pack the recently renovated Museum ofArt last night during the sneak preview open only
to University students. Art & Design sophomore Katharine Drake said she was impressed with the
museum's facelift, at the event last night - which celebrated the building's two-year, $41.9 million
renovation. "I think the space they created is amazing and displays the art beautifully," she said.

CONCENTRATING IN COLLECTIONS
Calling all curators: 'U'
to offer Museums minor

New concentration
will prepare students
for a variety of
museum-related jobs
By VALIANT LOWITZ
Daily StaffReporter
Beginning in Fall 2009, the Uni-
versity will make an addition to its
already extensive list of undergrad-
uate minors.
The minor in Museum Studies
is an 18-credit-hour program that
will incorporate themes ranging

from museums in society to objects
and collections.
According to the University's
History of Art website, the new
minor's goal will be to teach stu-
dents the purpose of museums, in
both a historical and modern con-
text, and prepare them for a number
of careers in museum-related fields.
The minor will also focus on the
ways in which museums add mean-
ing to objects, and how such objects
are redefined within the context of
the museum setting.
Raymond Silverman, director
of the Museum Studies Program
and professor of History of Art
and Afro-American and African

studies, said the minor is open to
all students who are interested in
museum work.
"Being a minor, it's going to be
an introduction to museums," Sil-
verman said, "It will be a stepping
stone into jobs at a range of differ-
ent types of museums, depending
on the interests of the student. A
very conscious decision was made
not to make it a concentration."
He added that the minor will
give students the flexibility to work
in any section of a museum that
interest them.
"Larger museums have a good
deal of specialization," Silver-
See MUSEUM MINOR, Page 7A

Outgoing MSA President Sabrina Shingwani passes the gavel to incoming President Abhishek Mahanti at last night'swreeting.
MSA transitions to its new leaders

STIMULUS AND THE LOCAL ECONOMY
County gets money to weatherize

$
Stir
go t
low

4.2 million in three years, starting April 1, thanks
to a $4.2 million grant from the
nulus funds will 2009 federal stimulus package.
According to Aaron Kraft, the
oward updating county's weatherization program
coordinator, the county usually has
-income housing an annual budget of approximately
$350,000, which covers about 100
By LARA ZADE homes.
Daily StaffReporter As a result of the weatherization,
Kraft said homeowners could see
htenaw County will be up to a 20 percent reduction in their
weatherize about 600 low- utility bills. In addition to extra
homes within the next change in their pockets, homeown-

ers will benefit from more comfort-
able and higher valued homes.
The millions of dollars in fund-
ing will cover all of the costs the
program needs to run, including
the costs of installing insulation,
home inspections, equipment and
employing staff.
According to the Michigan
Department of Human Services
Community ServicesPolicy Manual,
in order to be eligible for the fund-
ing, a household's annual income
See WEATHERIZATION, Page 7A

At swearing-in
meeting, outgoing
leaders disagree on
the state of assembly
By JENNA SKOLLER
Daily StaffReporter
At a meeting to swear in
Abhishek Mahanti and Michael
Rorro as the new leaders of the
Michigan Student Assembly, the
body's new beginning was juxta-
posed with a difference of opinion
about the current state of MSA by
two people who know it well.
Teary-eyed, outgoing Presi-
dent Sabrina Shingwani said her
four years in MSA were extremely

beneficial because the experience
exposed her to events and causes
and helped her form friendships
with a diverse group of people.
Shingwani stressed the impor-
tance of representatives mak-
ing the most of their time on the
assembly. She said representatives
should realize MSA's powerto cre-
ate change on campus and make it
their responsibility to bring about
that change.
"Look through the old minutes
and you will be overwhelmed by
everything that MSA has accom-
plished until now," she said. "It's
up to you to carry on that legacy of
hard work."
Outgoing Vice President Arvind
Sohoni said MSA helped him form
lasting friendships, but that he
doesn't feel that MSA effectively

serves the needs of the students to
its fullest extent.
"I leave knowing that we're
still a little bit short of reaching
our potential," he said. "We're
in a body far too concerned with
our internal struggles, whether it
be the latest code change or our
retreats, neither of which has a
direct effect on our student con-
stituents."
"In my mind, MSA should have
two fundamental goals: first, to
serve the student body in the most
effective, efficient way possible,
second, to develop experienced
student leaders," Sohoni contin-
ued. "At this point, I'm not sure
we're doing either as effectively as
we would like."
Last night's meeting at the
See MSA, Page 7A

Wass
able to
income

WEATHER HI: 53
TOMORROW LO:32

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NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Video of the Daily's tour of the Museum of Art.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/VIDEO

INDEX NEW S................
Vol. CXIX,No.116 OPINION.....,....,
A0.9.The.Michiean Daily A .TS.
michigandailycom

............2A C LA SSIFIED S.......... A...........6A
. .. 4A SPO RTS I....... .......... A....... 8A
............5A THE STATEMENT ..................1B

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