100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

cI1 0Udipan Baij

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, March 12,2009

michigandaily.com

The Economics of Nickels Arcade
Despite drawbacks, new shop
owners say corridor offers
unique business opportunities
By DEVON THOESBY<
For the Daily
Whether as a quick shortcut between State
Street and Maynard Street or as access to more
than a dozen businesses, Nickels Arcade has been
an unquestioned campus landmark since its com-
pletion in 1918.
While the Arcade's intimate atmosphere is
unique, it is less clear how successful of a business
opportunity the shop gallery presents.
Nickels Arcade has been home to dozens of shops
in Ann Arbor throughout its 90-plus years of exis-
tence. But businesses in the gallery have had a high
turnover rate in the past few years, with at least
three new businesses filling vacant spots in the last
year alone.
Still, shop owners say the shopping experience
provided by the arched corridor cannot be found
anywhere else near campus.
While the current state of the economy prob-
ably has affected the boutiques in the Arcade, Jesse
Bernstein, the Ann Arbor Area Chamber of Com-
merce president, maintains that the turnover rate
of shops filling the spaces is not necessarily some-
thing about which to be concerned.
Bernstein said the turnover of businesses in the
Arcade is simply an example of the inconsistency of
business.
"I think it's just economic reality," he said.
"Everybody assumes businesses last forever and
they don't. Things come and go; it's not necessarily - mm
a bad thing." N
However, Bernstein said he still believes it to be
a "great spot" in the city with unquestioned archi- A C-
ANNA BAKEMAN/Daily
See ARCADE ECONOMICS, Page 3A A wan walks past the State St. entrance to Nickels Arcade, which has recently seen much turnover.
MICHIGAN FOOTBALL
Stonum receives sentence for
Sept. alcohol-related charge

ARE YOU IN OR OUT (OF STATE)?
Residency
procedure
criticized

C
rai
hox
inf
Wh
time N
Josepi
billlas
but cri
Jos(
Michi
the U
Madis
Josepl
to atte
gan's I
one ye
ferred
in Ant
But

omplex process first semester tuition bill in Ann
Arbor, he discovered the Univer-
ses questions on sitywas charginghim out-of-state
tuition rates, despite the fact that
V 'U' will handle he has lived in Michigan most of
his life.
luX of tr ansfers "I was in-state (tuition) at
Dearborn," Joseph said. "So when
By NICOLE ABER I transferred over here, I never
Daily StaffReporter thought that I would be consid-
ered out-of-state."
en LSA junior and long- According to the Office of the
dichigan resident Lawrence Registrar's website, as per Uni-
h first glanced at his tuition versity Residency Classification
t semester, he couldn't help Guidelines, if you are a Michigan
inge. residentbut"you have attended or
eph was born and raised in graduated from a college outside
gan but decided to attend the state of Michigan, you must
niversity of Wisconsin at file an Application for Resident
on.After his freshman year, Classification and be approved to
h returned to his home state qualify for in-state tuition."
nd the University of Michi- Before filing residency clas-
Dearborn campus, and then sification applications, these stu-
arlater, Joseph againtrans- dents are billed for out-of-state
to the University's campus tuition. But most students can
n Arbor. avoid paying out-of-state tuition
after Joseph checked his See RESIDENCY, Page 3A

SUMMER IN THE CITY
Summer job
opportunities to
hold steady in A2

Wide receiver pled
guilty to charge
in February
ByTREVOR CALERO
Daily News Editor
After Michigan freshman wide
receiver Darryl Stonum showed up
late for his court date today, 15th
District Judge Julie Creal sentenced
him for a charge of operating a vehi-
cle while visibly impaired following
his arrest in late September.
Director of Student Legal Ser-
vices Doug Lewis, who represents
Stonum, would not discuss the spe-

cifics of the judge's sentence, but
Stonum could potentially face up to
93 days in jail, $300 in fines and 360
hours of community services.
A clerk at the 15th District Court
said the information would be avail-
able on the court website either later
today or tomorrow morning.
When he failed to show up for
the court date, Stonum was ini-
tially issued a bench warrant for
his arrest and $1,000 bond. The
warrant was dropped after Stonum
appeared, Lewis said.
When reached by telephone
today, Stonum said that he was at
the sentencing but declined to com-
ment further.
Stonum pleaded guilty to the

charge of operating a vehicle while
visibly impaired in February.
When contacted today, Lewis
disagreed with the premise of
reporting on the case.
"It's no more newsworthy than
the whole alcohol problem of all your
peers," he said of Stonum's offense.
He said that just because Stonum
is a well-known University athlete,
he shouldn't be held to a different
standard.
"It bothers me when you make
an issue out of one person," he said.
"Just because he's a football player
doesn't mean he's different than
anybody else."
Following the incident inSeptem-
ber, Michigan head football coach

Rich Rodriguez suspended Sto-
num from the team's game against
Illinois on Oct. 4 for a "violation of
team rules" but didn't offer any fur-
ther reasoning for the punishment.
On Nov. 4, the day of Stonum's
arraignment, Rodriguez said dur-
ing his weekly Big Ten teleconfer-
ence that Stonum would not be
disciplined further by the team fol-
lowing the one-game suspension.
In the team's next game against
Toledo the next week, Stonum did
play but didn't start. Stonum start-
ed at wide receiver in the rest of the
Wolverines' 12 games last season.
He ended his first season with the
team the season with 14 catches for
176 yards and one touchdown.

Store owners say
economic downturn
won't reduce hiring
from previous years
By ELYANA TWIGGS
Dafly StaffReporter
As unemployment rates across
the country soar, University stu-
dents who plan to spend their
vacation months in Ann Arbor
can rest assured that their sum-
mer job options are intact - for
the most part.
While some local businesses are

downsizing their summer staffs, a
number of owners said they plan
on hiring at rates similar to past
years and, as the economy tumbles,
don't feel the need to cut back.
Sava Lelcaj, who owns and
operates Sava's State Street Cafe,
said hiring rates at her restaurant
have not lowered because of the
economy.
"It'sthe same hiring rate," Lelcaj
said "Wehaven't been really affect-
ed by the recession in Ann Arbor,
and we hire mostly students."
Kerstin Woodside, assistant
manager of Orchid Lane, a fair-
trade clothing store on East Lib-
erty Street, said hiring is actually
See SUMMER JOBS, Page 3A

THE NEW MEDIA
Warner gives unusually optimistic
forecast for the future of journalism

MIXED BREED

Visiting professor:
New online options
could revamp
troubled industry
By ANNIE THOMAS
For the Daily
In a speech before a standing-
room-only crowd in the Hussey
room of the Michigan League last
night, guest professor Fara Warner
gave an unusually optimistic diag-
nosis for the future of journalism
in an increasingly technologically
oriented culture.
In her talk entitled "The Blogo-
sphere: The Future of Journalism?"
Warner assured attendees that

despite the seemingly dire future
of the industry in the Internet age,
there is much potential for reshap-
ing journalism to tap the full poten-
tial of new technology.
According to Warner, the How-
ard R. Marsh Visiting Professor of
Journalism, 13,000 journalists lost
their jobs last year, in addition to
the number of professional publica-
tions that folded. But she said this is
not reason to believe the industry is
unsalvageable.
"I'vebeenlisteningtopeoplertalk
about my industry and I am tired of
the woe is me, stick our heads in
the sand, and that newspapers are
going to go extinct," Warner said.
"Journalism is not dead. It's vibrant
and it isactive and is being pursued
around the world."
Warner said that today's news

media is mainly an entertainment
source, not satisfying her thirst for
hard-hitting news stories focusing
on the economy, politics and the
war in Iraq.
"To me radio - talk radio in
particular - and cable television
is not about news," Warner said.
"It's about talking heads and par-
tisan politics. It is about argument,
it is about debate, it is about fight-
ing words. It's a cheap way to have
entertainment."
Warner's lecture focused on new
media opportunities for journalism
and, more specifically, Internet sites
that completely revamp the way
people think about journalism.
Warner talked about the innova-
tive ways that people get their news
today, citing examples of twittering
See JOURNALISM, Page 3A

ANNA BAKEMAN/Daily
This mixed media sculpture named "Sparky" was created by Betsy Youngquist for the Gifts of Art program at the University
Health System. The program brings the world of art and music to patients to create a more calm and comfortable environment.

WEATHER H1: 39
TOMORROW LU023

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news ivmichigandaily.com and let us know.

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Daily Sports's Big Ten Tournament predictions.
THEGAME.BLOGS.MICHIGANDAILY.COM

INDEX NEWS... . . . 2A SPORTS ..........................I....5A
Vol CXIX, No 107 SUDOKU.. . ...3. A CLASSIFIEDS. ..A...........6A
2 9 ThenMichgan Daly OPINION............................4A TH E B-SIDE ................ 1B

A I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan