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March 11, 2009 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-11

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, March 11,2009

michigandaily.com

TOP OF THE TOWER

THE ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION
Obama ups
credit, loans
for students.

SAM WOLSON/Doily
Prof. Steven Bali performs the carillon on the 11th floor of the Burton Memorial Tower yesterday. Each weekday, a musician - either a student or professor -gives carillon
performances from the bell towers on both North Campus and Central Campus starting at noon. Anyone can travel to the bell tower for the free concert. Burton Memorial
Tower contains 55 bells, including North America's third-heaviest bell.
HOLLYWOOD ON CAMPUS
launches new ilmoffice

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Feb. 26
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)udget proposal, gram from $1billion to $6 billion
per year. The number of colleges
resident frees and universities participating in
the program would increase from
oral funds to pay 1,800 to 4,400. The University of
Michigan already takes part in the
higher education Perkins Loan Program.
Mike Boulus, executive direc-
By NICOLE ABER tor of the Presidents Council State
DgilyStaffReporter Universities of Michigan, said the
increase in direct -federal loans
students dependent on will be more beneficial for stu-
tnd lines of credit to pay for dents than loans currently offered
, a lockdown on the nation's by banks and private companies
ial markets has made it facing crises during the current
singly difficult to access economic downturn.
funding for education in "The more money available
months. for loans and grants, the greater
maintain college acres- opportunities students will have
in light of the country's because the more federal dollars
problems, President Barack available, guaranteed fromrthe fed-
a has laid out plans for an eral government, the less students
sion to federal grant and will have to rely on private loans
rograms in his proposed which are becoming very, very
presented to Congress on scarce right now," Boulus said.
5. Terry Stanton, public informa-
Obama administration reit- tion officer for Student Financial
its commitment to higher Services at the Michigan Depart-
ion in a statement released ment of Treasury, also said the
White House yesterday. increase in federal loans is impor-
ack of financial resources tant during the current time, as
never obstruct the promise banks and private lenders struggle
lege opportunity," accord- to generate capital.
the statement. "And it's "There were anumber offinancial
ca's shared responsibility to institutions issuing student loans,
that more of our students and a number of states wrapped up
ly reach the doors of col- intheir programs orsuspended pro-
ut also persist, succeed, and grams, Michigan included, because
their degree." of the credit crunch," he said. "The
budget proposes to expand federal government stepped in to
ederal Perkins Loan Pro- See BUDGET, Page 7A

With producers
calling, office will
coordinate bids to
film on campus
By ERIK TORENBERG
For the Daily
The glitz and glamour of Holly-
wood is starting to shine in Michi-
gan thanks to tax incentives from
the state for the film industry, and

University officials say they're
ready to put the campus in the spot-
light.
University officials recently
announced the formation of a film
office to coordinate movies being
filmed on campus. Demand for
access to the University for filming
has increased since Gov. Jennifer
Granholm signed legislation offering
about a' 40-percent refundable tax
credit for movie productions spend-
ing at least $50,000 in Michigan.
To complement the state's
efforts, the University is looking

to help film studios by allowing
them to film on campus. However,
Lee Doyle, who heads the new film
office, said she doesn't expect the
University to make much of a profit
off filming.
"The University is a nonprofit
entity so we have to be mindful that
we're not in it for profit for every-
thing we do," she said.
Doyle said that while the Uni-
versity isn't in it for the money, it
will have the costs associated with
filming on campus covered by film
producers.

Instead of concentrating on prof-
its, the office is focusing on attract-
ing film producers by building a
strong reputation for Ann Arbor
as a great place to make movies
and portraying the University as a
strong partner to the industry.
"The state of Michigan is trying
to get a foothold in a new industry,
so part of the important work for
that to happen is that filmmakers
have to come here, like it, and then
tell their friends," Doyle said.
Doyle said the impetus for the
See FILM OFFICE, Page 7A

COMMUNITY SERVICE
University lands top-ten spot
in ONE Campaign Challenge

MSA votes to support
Stop the Hike initiative

School that wins
final round receives
a free concert by
Vampire Weekend
By JENNA SKOLLER
Daily StaffReporter
The indie-rock band Vampire
Weekend is providing an extra
incentive for college across the
country competing in the ONE
Campaign Challenge.

The band could perform a free
show on campus in mid-April if the
the University's chapter of the ONE
Campaign wins the competition.
The ONE Campaign is a non-profit
organization focused on ending
global AIDS and poverty. The Uni-
versity's chapter is currently among
the top 10 competitors.
The ONE Campus Challenge is
a competition in which college stu-
dents across the country attempt to
raise awareness of extreme poverty
and preventable diseases.
In the first round of the pro-
gram, the organization's national

headquarters gave each of the
thousands of competing schools a
weekly challenge, like calling as
many congressmen as possible a d
planning an event for World AIS
Day. The top 10 schools accumu-
lated the most points from winning
these challenges.
Each of the top 10 schools will
receive a $1,000 grant from the
group's national headquarters to
be used toward an event to raise
awareness on campus.
The grants will be used to "build
a project, program or event that
See ONE CAMPAIGN, Page 7A

DISCUSSING HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Nobel winner to speak on campus

Campaign calls on
'U' to freeze tuition
rate if state funding
remains constant
By JENNA SKOLLER
Daily StaffReporter
The Michigan Student Assem-
bly passed a resolution at its week-
ly meeting last night that supports
the efforts of Stop the Hike, an
initiative that aims to help keep
tuition affordable for University
students.
Members of the initiative are
calling on the University to freeze
tuition, but only if the University's
funding from the state remains
constant.
Engineering senior Ashwin
Lalendran, who is working on the
initiative, said the group formed
after students discussed their
personal experiences with rising
tuition and explored possible solu-
tions to the problem.
"It started with informal dis-
cussions, with personal stories of
students in general in the current
economy and the understanding
of both sides: the University's side
and the state's side, the belief that
students can propose a solution,"
he said.
The group began the campaign
by formulating a survey to evaluate
student perspectives on a tuition

Economist Heckman
will talk about
adversity's impact on
children's growth
By CAITLIN SCHNEIDER
Daily News Editor
Economist and Nobel Prize
winner James Heckman will
speak about "The Economics
and Psychology of Inequality and
Human Development," on campus
tomorrow.

Heckman, a professor at the Uni-
versity of Chicago, will speak in the
Pendleton Room of the Michigan
Union at 3:30 p.m.
According to a press release,
Heckman's lecture will center on
recent research regarding the "eco-
nomics of human development."
Specifically, he will talk about how
inequalities within the family unit
and investments in children can
affect the development of a child
and how "optimal child investment
strategies differ depending on tar-
get outcomes of interest and on the
nature of adversity in a child's early
years." These strategies, according

to Heckman's research, can be used
to aid children's success.
The lecture is part of a two-day
conference called "The Long Run
Impact of Early Life Events II"
featuring economists, social epide-
miologists and developmental psy-
chologists.
Heckman won the Nobel Prize
for Economics in 2000 for his
development of a theory and meth-
ods regarding the analysis of selec-
tive samples. He has also been the
recipient of the John Bates Clark
Award of the American Econom-
ic Association in 1983, the 2005
See ECONOMIST, Page 7A

JED MOCH/Daily ,
Aria Everts, a student advocate for 'Stop the Hike' - an initiative to prevent tuition
increases at the University - addresses the Michigan Student Assembly last night.

freeze. It can be found at tinyurl.
com/stopthehike.
Though the initiative is unaf-
filiated with MSA or any other
student group, its participants said
they are looking for the support
of different student organizations
like the Interfraternity Council,
the Residence Hall Association
and LSA Student Government.
Lalendran said the best way'to
get the tuition freeze implement-
ed is by "approaching the student
governments, leveraging that
infrastructure and presenting one

unified voice to stand in solidar-
ity."
"And that's basically what we're
doing," he said.
Business Rep. Alex Serwer, who
is working on the initiative and
sponsored MSA'sresolutiontosup-
port it, said Stop the Hike wants to
implement plans that will not only
aid current University students,
but future ones as well.
"We need to create asustainable
infrastructure where people can
carry our torch into next year," he
See MSA, Page 7A

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