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March 03, 2009 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-03

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BIG HOUSE TO BIG LEAGUES
After the Wolverines' disappointing season, Tim Jamison,
Terrance Taylor and Morgan Trent had a lot to prove at the
NFL Combine. See how they fared. U See Sports, Page 8.
jie ffiidigan haiy

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

michigandaily.com

MAIZE AND BLUE IN WHITES

UNIE TY HELT SYST
Pescovitz
tohead
UMHS
First female to serve as CEO of
$1.5 billion unit will take over
in May, if approved by regents
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily Staff Reporter
University President Mary Sue Coleman
announced today that she has named Dr. Ora Hirsch
Pescovitz as the University of Michigan Health
System's next CEO and executive vice president for
medical affairs.
Pescovitz will be the first wonman and third per-
son to serve as executive vice president and CEO of
UMHS, a position thiat was created in 1997.
Pescovitz's appointment is
contingent upon final approval
by the Board of Regents at its
monthly meeting on March 19.
If the regents approve Pescovitz
for the position, she will suc-
ceed Robert Kelch, who cur-
rently serves as executive vice
president and CEO nf UMHS, PESCOVITZ
and will begin her new position
on May 11. Kelch plans to retire
later this year.
Pescovitz is being offered $700,000 in base com-
pensation from May 2009 to September 2010. She
will also be eligible to earn up to $150,000 in per-
formance incentives and $100,000 in deferred com-
pensation each year. Pescovitz will only receive the
deferred compensation money if she stays at UMHS
'for at least five years.
In her position, Pescovitz will manage the Health
System, which includes the Medical School, School
of Nursing, Hospitals and Health Centers and the
Michigan Health Corporation. The Hospital and
Health Centers have an annual operating budget of
more than $1.5 billion.
See PESCOVITZ, Page 3

KtISTA tOYD/Daily
Art & Design freshman Lindsay Balfour and Engineering senior Bill Kolodzey square of during the University fencing team's practice yesterday. The team participated ina fencing tournament aver
spring break at Notre Dame that took place from Feb. 28 through March 1. The team ended up placing fifth out of the 20 schools that competed at the event.
FUNDING HIGHER EDUCATION
Coleman: timuluss impact undear

President told faculty
body that funding total
may not be known for
the next few months'
ByKYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporter
In a meeting yesterday, University
President Mary Sue Coleman said she's
not certain how much funding the Uni-
versity will receive from the stimulus

package, but said plans are underway in
case additional money is received.
While answering questions from
members of the Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs, Coleman
said University administrators are cur-
rently working on next year's budget
and preparing for a possible influx of
money from the recently passed $787
billion federal stimulus package. How-
ever, Coleman said she is not certain if
any stimulus money directed to the state
will actually be given to the University.
"What I don't understand is whether
any money from the state ... will actually

come to universities, or will all of that
be reserved for K-12 or will that all be
reserved for infrastructure," she said.
Coleman said the University has
already proposed $300 million in pos-
sible capital projects at all of the Univer-
sity's campuses that could net stimulus
funds from the state. She added, though,
that the state hasn't released any funds
to the University for construction proj-
ects in several years.
Although many details remain
unclear, Coleman said if the state accepts
the federal stimulus money, one of the
stipulations of the bill is that Michigan

legislators mustagree not to cut the Uni-
versity's funding.
"If the state accepts the stimulus
money, the budgets of the University
cannot be cut below their 2008 levels,"
she said.
Coleman said while this is good news,
the University's funding is much lower
than in previous years, despite rising
cost factors like inflation.
"Not only have they not increased our
operating budget, it has been decreas-
ing,"shesaid."WhenIcameherein2002,
state allocation was about $365 million.
See COLEMAN, Page 3

ANN ARBOR GOVERNM ENT
City Council expands Greenbelt area

DISCUSSING KOREA'S DIVIDE

Mer
on,
for
Ann,
are now
Council

nbers table vote chase the development rights of
land in Webster Township at last
plastic bag ban night's meeting.
The cost to buy the land totaled
grocery stores just over $1.3 million. Funding for
the 146-acre purchase will come
By LARA ZADE from a combination of the city's
Daily StaffReporter Greenbelt funds, federal grants
and money from Webster Town-
Arbor's Greenbelt holdings ship. Taxpayers will contribute
146 acres larger after City less than 15 percent of the cost.
I voted unanimously to pur- Also known as the Open Space

and Parkland Preservation Mill-
age, Ann Arbor's Greenbelt District
is a program to provide funding
for the city to secure and preserve
undeveloped areas around the city
limits.
According to the city's official
Greenbelt website, the plan's three
primary goals of the plan are to
preserve large blocks of farm-
land in five target areas, preserve
land alongside the Huron River

and major tributaries and obtain
maximum leverage of taxpayer
money through use of grant funds,
partnerships and landowner dona-
tions.
The city began purchasing
development rights to family
farms for the purpose of protect-
ing the surrounding land, after
voters approved a tax levy to help
fund the program in November
See CITY COUNCIL, Page 3

UNIVERSITY IN MOURNING
Campus community
remembers English
Dept. Lecturer Wolk

OUT STANDING FACULTY
Five profs honored
with Thurnau awards

Mel
be r
h

At t
with a
lish D
Wolk r
"In ]
she n
improv
associa
Depart

morial event will with Wolk. "She used to stop by my
office regularly and talk about new
held March 25 to ideas for assignments, or about how
to enhance students' learning in
.onor educator lectures and discussions."
Wolk, a senior lecturer in the
By EMILY ORLEY English Department, lost her battle
For the Daily with cancer on Feb. 10.
In her honor, a memorial evnt
he age of 73 and diagnosed will be held March 25 in Audito-
dvanced stage cancer, Eng- rium B of Angell Hall from 4 p.m.
epartment Lecturer Merla to 5:30 p.m.
efused to slow down. Wolk graduated from the Uni-
her last term of teaching, versity of Michigan with a B.A. in
ever stopped working to 1957. She received her Ph.D. and
'e," said Theresa Tinkle, an M.A. from Wayne State University
te professor in the English in 1973 and 1981, respectively.
ment, who worked closely See WOLK, Page 3

Undergraduate
education the focus
of annual awards
By JOHN A. WEISS, JR.
For theDaily
In recognition of the fact that
outstanding faculty are essential
to any successful university, five
professors were recently award-
ed Arthur F. Thurnau Professor-
ships by the University.
At its February meeting, the
University Board of Regents
named Charles Bright, August
Evrard, Andrei Markovits, James
Walsh, and Margaret Wooldridge
as this year's recipients of the pro-
fessorship. The award is given to

faculty members for outstanding
contributions to undergraduate
education at the University.
The Office of the Provost's
website says the award honors
tenured faculty "whose com-
mitment to and investment in
undergraduate teaching has had
a demonstrable impact on the
intellectual development and
lives of their students."
Recipients of the award also
receive a $20,000 grant to aid
their teaching.
The honorary title remains
with professors for the duration
of their time at the University.
Evrard, professor of phys-
ics and astronomy, said he was
"pleasantly surprised," to learn
of his award.
See THURNAU, Page 3

Ice 519,BOYD/Daly
Former South Korean Minister of Unification and 2007 presidential candidate Chang
Dong-young, gave a lecture today entitled "The 'Fourth Wave' in North and South
Korea Relations" in the Michigan League on the importance of moving beyond Cold
War tensions between the two Koreas and working toward reunification.

WEATHER HI: 37
TOMORROW o: 25

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