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March 02, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, March 2,2009

michigandaily.com

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MEDICAL SCHOOL TRAINING
University
ends use of
live dogs in
courses

For a slideshow of the Wolverines' weekend series
against Ferris State, go to michigandaily.com..

SAID ALSAL AH/Daly
Senior goaltender Billy Sauer, who was benched in favor of sophomore Bryan Hogan this season, was
given the nod in net Saturday against Ferris State. He posted a 4-0 shutout win on Senior Night in what
could be his final appearance in Yost Ice Arena. For more on the game, see SportsMonday, Page1B.

BOOSTING ANN ARBOR'S ECONOMY
A2 officials ready stimulus wishlist

Decision comes
amid complaints
from medical
ethics committee
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporter
In a statement released Thurs-
day, the University of Michigan
Health System announced that it
would no longer use live dogs in
its Advanced Trauma Life Sup-
port course at the University's
Medical School.
The decision comes after
the Physician's Committee for
Responsible Medicine - a non-
profit organization that promotes
ethical research and experiment
methods - heavily criticized
-UMHS for the practice and filed
a complaint with the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture arguing that
Dr. Richard Burney, a Medical
School professor, misled a Uni-
versity committee in order to use
live animals in his course.
UMHS has now decided to
use only simulated models for its
training, like the TraumaMan
System - an artificial human sys-
tem that allows users to practice
surgical procedures.
The UMHS statement released
cited a recommendation from an
internal committee as the reason
for the change.
"The decision comes from a
recommendation by the Health

System's Graduate Medical Edu-
cation Committee after a review
of simulators that can be used to
train medical professionals in
trauma procedures," the state-
ment said.
The statement also said UMHS
carefully considers the educa-
tional benefit against the resourc-
es required when evaluating a
project or course.
"In all of its educational
endeavors, careful attention
is given to matching the opti-
mal learning tools and settings
to trainees' needs - including
simulation methods through
the Medical School's advanced
simulation center, where stu-
dents, physicians-in-training and
nurses learn using mannequins,
computer-based simulations and
virtual trainers," the statement
said.
UMHS officials declined
further comment Friday when
details about the policy change
were sought.
Dr. John Pippin, a senior medi-
cal and research adviser for the
PCRM, congratulated UMHS on
its announcement.
"We are very pleased that U-M
has conducted a careful review
of teaching methods for their
Advanced Trauma Life Support
Program, and that simulators are
replacing shelter dogs acquired
through pound seizure," he
wrote in an e-mail Friday. "This
is yet more confirmation that it is
unnecessary to use and kill ani-
mals to teach trauma skills."

Plan
re
Hou
Slight
After
billion s
Ann Ar
quickly
some of
to help t
Whil
lates tha
money
the oth

is include bridge for "shovel-ready" social programs
issued at the state level and often
pairs near Big administered at the local level.
Ann Arbor City Councilmember
ise, making city Leigh Greden (D-Ward 3), who is
coordinating the stimulus requests
ts more efficient for Ann Arbor's City Council, said
that the city compiled a wish list of
By LARA ZADE shovel-ready public works projects
Daily StaffReporter it is hoping the stimulus package
will fund.
Congress passed its $787 Though the city has dozens of
timulus package last month, projects that it would like to be
bor City Council members funded by the stimulus package,
began talking about how Greden said the city has prioritized
that money might be used five projects.
:he city. "The first on the list is anything
e the federal plan stipu- related to repairing Stadium Bou-
at 36 percent of the stimulus levard," he said. "The two south-
must go toward tax rebates, ern lanes of Stadium Boulevard are
er 64 percent will be used closed at the bridge because the

beam that supports that part of the
bridge is deteriorating."
Greden said the city would like
to rebuild the bridge entirely, but
the cost would exceed the amount
of stimulus funding that the whole
county will receive.
Keeping this in mind, the city
expects $500,000 for emergency
repairs to the beam so that traffic
can be opened back up again.
Greden said he's fairly confident
that the city will receive the fund-
ing for the bridge's emergency
repairs because the Washtenaw
Area Transportation Study, the
city's local transportation coordi-
nator, has included the Stadium
Boulevard project as one of its top
priorities.
See WISHLIST, Page 7A

ANN ARBOR'S WISHLIST
The ftie projects officials hope will get
stimulus tunding and estimated costs.
$500,000
Emergencyrepairsfor deteriorating parts
of the bridgeon Statium Boulevard
$1 MILLION
Weatherization of city's low-income housing
$12 MILLION
Phase twoof the projectlto upgrade the
Ann Arbor Municipal Center
$3 MILLION
Phasetwo of a greening project at
Fifth and Division Street
$3.8 MILLION
Convertingall of the city's lights to
environmentally-friendlyLED lights

UNIVERSITY LICENSING
After complaints, 'U' to cut
contract with Russell Corp.

Your bus's ETA? Just a text away

Athletic apparel
company alledgedly
fired employees for
trying to unionize
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporter
University officials announced
last week that. a licensing con-
tract between the University and

Russell Corporation, an athletic
apparel manufacturer that has
recently come under fire for alleg-
edly infringing on its workers'
rights, will not be renewed.
Russell Corp. has been accused
of firing employees from two of the
company's manufacturing plants
in Honduras because the workers
attempted to unionize.
The University's Advisory Com-
mittee on Labor Standards and
Human Rights sent a letter to Uni-
versity officials last month asking

them not to renew the contract
with Russell Corp. when it expires
at the end of March.
"Because of the company's pre-
vious failure to adhere to its own
standards of conduct, we do not
feel that continuing the license,
even under strict monitoring of any
new code of conduct, is appropri-
ate," the letter said.
University spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham said the committee's
recommendation was the main
See CONTRACT, Page 7A

Ph.D. student's new
system could cut
waiting times at
campus bus stops
By MATT AARONSON
Daily StaffReporter
Everyone hates waiting for the
bus.
Computer Science and Engi-
neering Ph.D. student Scott Wol-
chok is no exception.
So when Wolchok, who regu-
larly rode the University buses as
an undergraduate, saw a way that
he could cut back on time spent
waiting at the bus stop, he jumped
on it.
Wolchok recently created
UmBus, a program that allows
students to check Magic Bus -
an online bus tracking service
from their cell phones. By texting
"umbus" to 41411, and using a few
simple commands, students can
find out when a bus will be arriv-
ing at a specific stop.
Magic Bus, a project funded by
Parking&TransportationServices
and carried outby the Atmospher-
ic, Oceanic and Space Science
Department in the College of
Engineering in 2004, adapts GPS
bus tracking to an online interface.
The site gives a route view that

CAMPUS LGBT CONFERENCE
University picked for 2011 LGBT event

Annual conference
draws more than
1,500 people a year
By JENNA SKOLLER
Daily StaffReporter
The University won a bid last
month to host the annual Midwest
Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender

Ally College Conference in Febru-
ary 2011L
For the past 16 years, students
from colleges across the Midwest
have attended these conferences,
which draw about 1,500 partici-
pants each year. The aim of the
conference is to raise awareness
of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans-
gender issues through a weekend
of workshops, speakers and state
caucuses.

The University of Michigan bid
team presented at this year's con-
ference at Indiana University last
month in hopes of winning host-
ing rights to the conference in 2011.
The bid team was composed of
multiple LGBT students and was
advised by Spectrum Center Assis-
tant Directors Lauren Sherry and
Gabe Javier.
Javiersaid the University'sLGBT
See CONFERENCE, Page 7A

Ph.D. student Scott Wolchok has created a way to track campus buses by phone.
displays the number of minutes Wolchok had been using Magic
until a bus arrives at a given stop, Bus since its launch in 2006, even
as well as a map view that shows developing his own desktop and
color-coded buses' positions on a Web applications for it in his free
Google map. See BUSES, Page 7A

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