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January 28, 2009 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

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Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 7A

FALLOUT
From Page 1A
thatifthesophomorestaysenrolled
through the spring, the coach will
be willing to discuss the forward's
future with the team.
"It was a tough decision, but the
right decision," Michigan State
coach Comley said. "I think the
action that took place in the heat of
the battle was inappropriate.
Idon'tthinkthekidsarebadkids.
I don't think it was premeditated."
Yesterday, Michigan coach Red
Berensonagreedthathe feltKamp-
fer wasn't specifically targeted.
"It all comes down to intent -
sometimes, its not what you do and
why you do it," Berensonsaid."This

wasnotapremeditated thing,butit
was an instant reaction and it was
too serious to overlook."
Kampfer suffered a concussion
and strained neck in the inci-
dent. Though he didn't practice
yesterday, Berenson is hopeful
Kampfer will practice with the
team tomorrow pending medical
clearance.
Berenson said he was unaware
of the Michigan State players'
decisions.
"I think it's a serious situation
and that's a serious reprimand,"
Berenson said. "When you're a
coach,thefirstthingyouwanttodo
is defend your players, but there's a
point where there's no defense. But
I respect Rick Comley for making a
tough decision like that."

HOUSING
From Page 1A
hand, the high student populas
tion actually induces higher rent
for downtown living, because
students are able to afford ris-
ing rent costs. As a result, lower
income residents are pushed out
of the downtown area.
But by including the student
population in the federal census
conducted every 10 years, the
city and county can get more
federal funding for low-income
housing.
"When we do our census every
10 years, that includes student
housing. On paper students look
extremely low income," she said.
"We probably get more money
than if they were supposed to
take students out of that formu-
la."
City-county community devel-
opment officials are planning to
continue to work with local busi-
nesses and residents within the
neighborhoods of the proposed
sites and are looking to hold pub-
lic hearings to address concerns
in upcoming months.

ADVISING THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT

LAMP
From Page 1A
Medical Relief - a non-profit
organization based in Detroit -
who traveled to the Philippines
and assisted in a surgery that
was performed in the dark with a
flashlight.
"We figured if we could devel-
op a light that had good optical
properties and at the same time
had good battery backup so that
if there was an electricity short-
age or a blackout or a brownout,
the light could still keep running,"
Samorezov said.
Stephen DeWitt, who led the
lamp design, said the group's aim
was to set the cost of initial proto-
type lamps at $200 so developing
countries could afford to construct
them.
"The long-term goal is to meet
up with entrepreneurs in the
developing countries themselves
and have them fabricate it," DeW-
itt said.
He said that once the lamp
becomes mass-produced, the cost
shouldeventually decreasebecause
of lower material and labor costs.
The project is currently funded
by the University's Department of
Biomedical Engineering.
Initially the lamp was to be
piloted in Ghana and Uganda,
but the first prototype will be
sent with World Medical Relief to
Liberia in March.
Samarezov said M-HEAL plans
to keep up contact with the hos-
pitaltesting the lamp so they can
later determine what improve-
ments need to be made.
"We want to go there, drop the
lamp off, see how it does and see
if the technicians and the hospi-
tals think 'Oh this is great, but we
would really like it if it also did
this," she said. "So we really want
HAVE A
TALENT
FOR
WEB
DESIGN OR
BUILDING?
E-mail graca@
michigandaily.
cor
for more
information.

to have a good dialogue with the
people there, come back, make
improvements and then turn it
into a business model where we
can get the plans to people in the
developing world."'
If the lamp works success-
fully in Liberia, M-HEAL plans
to produce another four lamps
by the end of the semester to
send with WMR and other Uni-
versity medical student groups
traveling to countries over the
summer.
in addition to the surgi-
cal lamp, the group has been
researching new design ideas.
One idea is to create a centri-
fuge that relies on a gyroscope
and can be hand-powered to spin
blood samples. These samples
would show how much iron is in
the blood and would indicate ifa
patient was anemic.
Another idea isto invent a reus-
able glucometer test strip that
people with diabetes can use to
check their blood sugar.
Samarezov said M-HEAL sent
out surveys last spring to hos-
pitals in Jamaica, Mongolia and
Cuba, which identified centrifug-
es and glucometers as "high-need
items."
"Our design plan is to have
some people research these ideas
and see if they're feasible, see if its
already been done and thentake it
to the same process the lamp has
been through," she said.
Aileen Huang-Saad, M-HEAL
advisor and biomedical engineer-
ing lecturer, said she is excited
about the potential of the-surgical
lamp.
"I think we have an extremely
dedicated group of individuals
that have really identified some
critical needs and (have shown)
how students at the University
of Michigan can impact people
beyond borders," she said.

At last night's LSA-SG meeting, Tim Dodd, the director of the Newnan Academic Advising Center, told students to work wit
departments to improve the University's academic experience and, in particular, advising. "I'm talking about departments
creating internship opportunities, advising, teaching; and the best wayto do that isto get students involved," Dodd said.

MSA
From Page 1A
students who want to be active on
campus," he said. "And we want to
deconstruct that red tape."
The resolution passed with no
objections.
MSA also approved a bid for
the University to host the 2011
Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay
Transgender and Ally College
Conference. The conference is
held at a different college in the
Midwest each year.
The University put in a bid last
year to host the conference, but
was unsuccessful. The assembly
ECONOMISTS
From Page 1A
boost.
"Because of the low spending
propensity, the rebates in 2008 pro-
vided low'bang for the buck' as eco-
nomic stimulus," Shapiro said in a
press release. "Puttingcash into the
hands of the consumers who use it
to save or pay off debt boosts their
well-being, but it does not necessar-
ily make them spend."
In a survey of more than 2,500
people, Shapiro and Slemrod found
that 80 percent of Americans who
received a tax rebate as part of the
2008 Stimulus Act either saved the

will find out if the University won
the right to host the conference at
this year's conference in February.
In the past, the University has
hosted to the conference.
The assembly's Chief of Staff
Ashley Schwedt, who is helping in
the effort, said she thinks the Uni-
versity is a likely candidate.
"I think we have a good chance,"
she said. "I think that Michigan is a
pretty obvious choice to have it."
The resolution passed in a 21-0
vote with four abstentions.
The final resolution approved at
last night's meeting called for the
creation of the Athletic Relations
Select Committee.
money orused itpay offexistingdebt.
The remaining 20 percent said they
spent at least part of their rebates.
The survey also found that older
Americans were the most likely to
spend their tax rebates, with 28.5
percent of people over the age of 65
spending their rebate checks, com-
pared to only 11.7 percent of people
under the age of 29.
Most individuals who qualified for
the Stimulus Act received between
$300 and $600. Couples who filed
jointly received between $600 and
$1,200.Parentswithchildrenreceived
an additional $300 per child.
Intended to inject more money
into the economy, the percentage
of people who actually spent their

Athletics personnel have previ-
ously approached MSA to address
interactions between student-ath-
letes, the student body and athletic
policies, according to the resolution.'
LSA Rep. Andrew Chinsky, who
authored the resolutionwas accept-
ed as chair of the committee.
The purpose of the committee
will be to strengthen the relation-
ship between student-athletes and
other University students. It is also
intended to heighten fan participa-
tion and morale. The committee
also hopes to work with athletic
personnel to address concerns
related to both students and stu-
dent-athletes.
rebate money was significantly
lower than expected when the
package was first proposed.
"Putting cash into the hands of
the consumers who use it to save
or to pay off debt boosts their well
being, but it does not necessarily
make them spend," Shapiro said.
Though part of the Obama
stimulus plan includes a $500 tax
rebate to most working Ameri-
can families, the professors'
research initially concluded that
this approach might not be the
most effective way to improve the
economy. In light of the worsen-'
ing financial conditions in recent
months, Shapiro said a more long-
term solution to the economic cri-

Chinsky said he hopes the com-
mittee will enhance the experience
of attending all types of student
sporting events.
"There are a lot of things that we
could be doing to improve the expe-
rience for students, whether it's
football or any of the other sports,"
he said. "And so hopefully we can
work with the athletic office and
the different teams to increase an
awareness and appreciation for all
the different sports."
The resolution passed with no
opposition.
Mallory Beberman
contributed to this report.
sis is necessary.
"Those designing the next eco-
nomic stimulus package should
take into account that much of
the temporary tax rebate is likely
not to be spent," Shapiro said.
"Instead, tax changes that give
a sustained boost to purchasing
power of households are more
likely to be effective."
Shapiro and Slemrod published
their findings in a report entitled,
"Did the 2008 Tax Rebates Stimu-
late Spending?"
The professors shared their
research at an annual meeting of
the American Economics Associa-
tion, which took place earlier this
month in San Francisco.

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For Thursday, Jan. 29, 2009
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
A bright idea might occur to you
today. It's one of those "Eureka!"
moments. (It's great when they happen,
because they make you feel alive!)
TAURUS
(April 20to May 20)
You might meet someone who is a
character today. Or someone you already
know might do something bizarre and
surprising. Interesting!
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Bosses, parents and VIPs might be
shocked by something you say or do
today. Something thrusts you into the
limelight briefly so thateveryone notices
you.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
Surprise opportunities to travel or to
further your education might existltoday.
Someone from a different background or
different culture could intrigue you.
LEO
(July 23 toAug. 22)
Unexpected gifts, favors or goodies
from others might come your way today.
People are spontaneously generous to
you. Alternatively, surprise solutions to
problems with inheritances or insurance
matters might arise.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Expect a few surprises from partners
and close friends today. They might say
or do something that catches you off
guard. Someone might also express the
need for more space or more freedom.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23to Oct. 22)
Interruptions at work are likely today,
possibly due to computer crashes, power
outages, fire drills, staff shortages or
sudden changes in plans. Stay light on
your feet!

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
A surprise flirtation might make you
sit up and take notice today. Parents
should be vigilant with children under
their care, because it's an accident-prone
day for children.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Unexpected company might drop by
today. Expected company might be a no-
show. Power outages and surprising
events create a hiccup in your domestic
routine.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
This is a mildly accident-prone day for
your sign. Take extra care with whatever
you're doing or saying. Slow down and
allow extra time for everything.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 toFeb. 18)
You might find money today; you
might lose money today. Something to
do with your money or your possessions
is unpredictable! If you're shopping
today, you'll succumb to impulse buy-
ing.
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
You want the freedom to do your own
thing today. You won't like being
restricted by others. Something unex-
pected might catch you off guard.
(Perhaps it makes you realize what it is
you really want to do.)
YOU BORN TODAY You're playful .
and fun-loving, and you have excellent
social skills. You also have a fine mind
and a sincere desire to make the world a
better place. Although you are essen-
tially passive in your approach to things,
nevertheless, you will always fight for
the underdog. A major change will take
place this year, perhaps something as
significant as around the year 2000.
Birthdate of: Thomas Paine,
writer/American revolutionary; Oprah
Winfrey, TV host/philanthropist; Teresa
Teng, singer.

C 2009 King Features Syndicate, inc.

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