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November 26, 2008 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-11-26

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nRY CRISIS CHINESE MEDIOCRITY STILL KICKIN'
my has d a spike Latest album by Guns N' Roses, a decade With win over UC-Davis, Michigan soccer
gan's fd banks.t' worth the wait team advances to NCAA Round of 16.
Statement, inside See Arts, Page ASee Sports, Page 8A

Ann Arbor, Michigan Wednesday, November 26, 2008
THANKSGIVING DINNER AT THE CO-OP

michigandaily.com
THE AUTO INDUSTRY AND THE 'U'
Carmakers'
struggles hit
U finances

Detroit Three cuts
donations, research
funds could suffer
By LINDY STEVENS
Daily StaffReporter
Like the rest of southeast Mich-
igan, the University is already
taking a financial hit from the
troubles of the Detroit automak-
ers. Ifany one of the Detroit Three
fail, that hit could get much more
painful.
With substantial annual
research funding contributions
from General Motors Corp., Ford
Motor Co., Chrysler LLC, and
sizeable donations from Univer-
sity alumni that are now Detroit
Three employees, the future ofthe
University's finances are linked to
the economic fate of the strug-

gling automakers.
Ford, the healthiest of the
Detroit Three, has donated more
than $12.8 million over the past
five years and been one of the
University's largest financial con-
tributors, according to Jefferson
Porter, the University's associate
vice president for donor relations.
Once major benefactors, the
Detroit Three have begun to
downsize their roles as some of
the University's largest financial
players. Ford gave $4.4 million in
2005, GM gave almost $2.5 mil-
lion in 2007 and Chrysler gave.
$476,000 in 2008. But each of
the three companies gave about
$275,000 this fiscalyear.
Accordingto Porterthedecline
in funding from Ford, GM and
Chrysler has led the University
to rely more heavily on individual
donors rather than a continued
See AUTOS, Page 7A

LSA senior Ryan Brissette cuts the turkey while the rest of his housemates at Nakamura House wait during the co-op's Thanksgiving Dinner last night.
STUDENT NEIGH BORHOODS
Trash code angers students

Fine print can lead
to large fines for
first-time violators
By SARA LYNNE THELEN
DailyStaffReporter
For rowdier student neighbor-
hoods, tailgate season means
trash citation season. Though the
number of violations decreased
this year compared to last year,
students and landlords have been
irked by the fine print of the city's
trash code.
While trash citations during

during August and September
decreased,from 93 citations in
2007 to 84 in 2008, residents are
increasingly vocal about the cita-
tions, accusing Ann Arbor's litter,
solid waste and nuisance laws to
be nonsensical.
LSA senior Daniel Chiego
recalls this year's football game
against Utah with frustration. And
it's not because Michigan lost.
"Our first trash ticket that we
incurred was a thousand dollars,
no questions asked," said Chiego,
who lives on the 800 block of East
University Avenue. "I really don't
feel that that makes any sense, and
it's unfair to students."

Chiego's first citation was so
severe because the city keeps
track of violations by the property,
not the individual. The citation
amount, then, increases per each
citation made on a property, not its
renters. That means students who
move in after messy tenants could
be given more expensive tickets,
even for a first violation.
Regardless of who lives at the
property, prices for penalties con-
tinue to increase until a residence
stays ticket-free for two consecu-
tive years. Tickets for a trashy yard
start at $100, increase to between
$250 and $500 for the second, and
jump as high as $1,000 for each

additional violation.
During her rounds last Thurs-
day afternoon, Community Stan-
dards Officer Jodi Dyer said
officers working tailgate neigh-
borhoods begin ticketing as soon
as the game starts because parties
in those areas tend to get out of
control.
"We don't really have a lot of
tolerance for it," she said.
Tempers have flared recently
over repeat citations and the city's
trash codes.
Last month, another resident
of East University Avenue's 800
block was charged for assault after
See TRASH, Page 7A

INVESTING IN THEDETROIT THREE
The amount of the University's endowment in auto investments. GM
$6 millionFor
jChrysler
$5 million
$4 million
$3 million
$2 million
$1 million
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
SOURCE:UNIVERSITY OFMICHIGAN,THE MICHIGANDAILY

HEALTH CARE COSTS
Health System to lay off 80

Ticket sales brisk after big win

Officials say Dec.
layoffs prompted
by slow economy
By ELAINE LAFAY
Daily StaffReporter
The University of Michigan
Health System will cut as many as
80 jobs in December, the Univer-
sity announced Tuesday.
Laid-off employees will be noti-
fied during the second week of
December.
A press release issued Tues-

day said the cuts are necessary
to maintain financial stability in
the midst of the state's economic
recession.
"Despite efforts to meet budget
goals through attrition, a hiring
freeze for non-clinical positions,
and reductions in overtime and
temporary positions, reductions
in force in a few departments
will be necessary," Health Sys-
tem CEO Doug Strong said in the
release.
The 80 employees - about 0.5
percent of the Health System's
total workforce - will remain on
payroll until January. Those that

have worked in the Health System
for more than 10 years can remain
on the payroll longer.
Earlier this month, the Health
System announced plans for a
hiring freeze for non-clinical
positions like human resources,
communications, finance and
information technology.
A statement issued on Nov.
4 said that because of recent
increases in patient numbers,
the Health System will continue
to hire doctors, nurses and other
positions in patient care while
cutting back in other depart-
See HOSPITAL, Page 7A

Attendance up for
first home game
after upset of UCLA
By JASMINE ZHU
Daily StaffReporter
The Michigan basketball team's
surprise 55-52 victory against
fourth-ranked UCLA has many
students giddy over the possi-
bilities for Michigan's basketball
season. So far, that sentiment has
allowed the Athletic Department
tickets to sell more tickets to the
team's home games.
TicketsfortheDec. 6Dukegame
sold out on Nov. 21, the day after
the UCLA game. Marty Bodnar,
associate athletic director for tick-
eting services, said he thinks there
was a correlation between the
UCLA win and the sellout for the
upcoming Duke game. He said that
although the tickets were already
close to being sold out prior to the
UCLA game, the win certainly
helped to spur sales further.
According to Bodnar, before
the UCLA game, the Duke game
was roughly 700 tickets short of
being sold out. Thanks to heavy
promotions since the end of Octo-
ber aimed at students via e-mail,
Bodnar said, the Duke tickets
were expected to sell out during
Thanksgiving break.
Although he mainly attributed
the quick sellout of the Duke game

FOOTBALL PHILANTHROPY
Carr to assist in EMU head coach search

Former Michigan
football coach began
career at Eastern
By CHRIS HERRING
Managing News Editor
A year after retiring, former
Michigan football coach Lloyd
Carr has agreed to help the strug-
gling Eastern Michigan University
football program find a new head
coach.

Eastern Michigan Head Foot-
ball Coach Jeff Genyk was fired
Monday after posting a 15-42
record in five seasons for the
neighboring Ypsilanti school.
The Eagles are currently 2-9
with one game remaining in the
season.
Eastern Michigan Athletic
Director Derrick Gragg mentioned
Carr's intention to help with the
coaching ina statement.
"Carr coached at EMU and
enjoys a good relationship with me
and many others within our Uni-

versity's leadership," Gragg said.
Gragg worked with Carr as the
University of Michigan's compli-
ance director from 1997 to 2000.
Carr will work as an unpaid
adviser for Eastern Michigan,
where he began his collegiate
coachingcareer in 1976. He worked
for two years as an Eagles assistant
coach.
Carr posted a 2-0 record
against the Eagles during his ten-
ure at Michigan, beating Eastern
in 2005 and 2007. The Wolverines
See CARR, Page 7A

Rackham student Debra Lauterbach uses her MCard to get into last night's men's
basketball game against Norfolk State for free.

to the Athletic Department's mar-
keting plans, Bodnar said the win
against UCLA helped to sell out
the game a few days sooner than
expected.
"Once we beat UCLA, the sell-
out [for Duke tickets] came pretty
quick," he said.
LSA senior Emre Kazan, a
member of the Maize Rage

cheering group, said he thinks
the increased student interest in
Michigan basketball is due to both
the UCLA win and the marketing
department providing incentives
for students to go to the game, like
free tickets and free food.
Because of the UCLA win,
Kazan said he is more likely to
See TICKETS, Page 7A

TODAY'S HI:39
WEATHER LO: 29

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GONE FEASTING
The Daily isn't publishing until Monday because
of Thanksgiving Break.

INDEX NEWS..............
Vol. cXVIV, No. 60 OPINION........
(2008 The Michigan Daily ARTS...............
wichigundaily cow

....2A CLASSIFIEDS........ ...........6A
....4A SPORTS.. .... ...........8A
....SA THESTATEMENT.................1B

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