100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 2008 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Iie fiidiari 0aiI

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, November 4, 2008

michigandailycom

GUIDE TO
ELECTION
DAY '08
WHAT TO EXPECT
WHEN YOU VOTE
Waiting in potentially long lines will
at least be pleasant. Forecasts call for
sunny weather and near-record highs
in the mid-70s.
Observers from both parties could
be at your polling place. Your registra-
tion or identity might be challenged.
But if you registered, you have the
right to vote. Don't give up on casting
your ballot.
EYou must vote at the precinct
assigned to you. Find your polling place
on publius.org.
UPDATED COVERAGE
For the latest news, check out
michigandaily.com/election
Updates throughout the day
about voting in Ann Arbor and around
southeast Michigan.
Post your Election Day photos on
michigandaily.com's precinct map.
E-mail them to bridgeto@umichedu.
See something interesting? Have
trouble voting? We want to know
about it. E-mail us at news@michi-
gandaily.com or call the newsroom at
734-763-2459.
FREE STUFF
After you vote, check out these Election
Day giveaways:
Starbucks is giving out a free cup of
coffee to anyone who votes.
The Relaxation Station is giving a
10 percent discount to anyone with an "I
Voted" sticker.
Ben& Jerry's is giving out a free
scoop of ice cream between 5 and 8 p.m.
OTHER RACES TO WATCH
There's a lot at stake in Michigan today
further down the ballot. Here are a few
interesting races to pay attention to as
results come in.
State Senate Minority Leader Mark
Schauer is trying to unseat Rep. Tim
Walberg in the 7th District U.S. Con-
gressional race. Schauer has been doing
well in polls, and Democrats are putting
lots of resources into this race.
National Democrats are also focused
on knocking off Rep. Joe Knollenberg
(R-Bloomfield Township) from his seat
representing the 9th District. Gary
Peters and Knollenberg have been
campaigning hard. Peters and Schauer
are a key part of Democrats' plans
to expand their majority in the

House of Representatives.
Two seats are open on the University
Board of Regents - the University of
Michigan's elected governing body.
Democratic incumbent Larry Deitch
is runningtfor re-election. Democrat
Denise Illitch and Republicans John
aFond and Susan Brown are also
vyingtfor seats.

DECISION DAY
Youths shaped this race, but their biggest test.is today

By JULIE ROWE
and JACOB SMILOVITZ
Daily StaffReporters
Less than eight hours before
polls open in Michigan tomorrow,
Gov. Jennifer Granholm took the
stage at the Michigan Union to
rally students in support of Barack
Obama.
While wearing a shirt ban-
nered with "1.20.09" - the last

day George W. Bush will serve as
president - 'Granholm told the
crowd of 600 University students
that their votes
are needed to put ANALYSIS
Barack Obama in
the White House.
"This is your election," Gra-
nholm said. "You've got to prove
them wrong when they say that
young people don't vote.You've got
to prove to them that your moment

is now."
The rally, which brought
several Michigan Democratic
heavyweights to campus, was a
call-to-arms, attempting to mobi-
lize members of the country's
most unreliable voting bloc: 18- to
24-year olds.
Behind the impassioned speech-
es and fervent applause is a linger-
ing concern that this election will
be just like the last one, and many

before that, in which Democratic
candidates have counted on young
voters to buck the trend and show
up the polls on Election Day, only
to discover that those votes never
materialized.
For older Americans, the Bush
presidency is one of many they've
seen in their adult lives. For col-
lege juniors, the Bush presidency is
almost all they know. He was first
elected when they were in middle

school.
Political Science Prof. Michael
Traugott, who studies political
polls and surveys, said the Demo-
cratic focus on younger voters has
not proven effective in the past, but
people between the ages of 18 and
24 support Obama over Republican
nominee John McCain by a 2-to-1
margin.
"The Democrats in particular
See ANALYSIS, Page 7

Gov. Jennifer Granholm rallies University of Michigan students
during an event held last night in the Michigan Union. About 600
students attended the rally, which also included a performance by
the Ann Arbor-based band My Dear Disco.
What0f9.0

Proposal Ipasses and
medicinal marijuana
is legalized?
By STEPHANIE STEINBERG
and ELIN BERGMAN
Daily Staff Reporters
Michigan voters will decide today
whether to legalite marijuana for
medicinal purposes. If Proposal 1
passes, Michigan will be the nation's
13th state to allow patients with
severe illnesses to grow and own
marijuana.
The proposal says physicians can
prescribe marijuana for registered
patients with "debilitating medical
conditions including cancer, glaucoma,
HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, (multiple scle-
See MARIJUANA, Page 7

Proposal 2 passes and
stem cell research is
legalized?
By NICOLE ABER and LARA ZADE
Daily Staff Reporters
The outcome of Proposal 2, a ballot
initiative that would loosen the state's
restrictions on embryonic stem cell
research, could have huge implica-
tions for both the University of Michi-
gan and the state as a whole.
If passed, the proposal would over-
turn a 1978 Michigan law, banning
researchers in Michigan from obtaining
their own stem cell lines from embryo's
donated by-fertility treatment centers.
These embryos would only be
donated if they would be otherwise
See STEM CELLS, Page 7

4

Hathaway or Taylor McCain or Obama
wins a seat on the state . is elected the nation's
Supreme Court? 44th president?
By THOMAS CHAN By ELAINE LAFAY
Daily Staff Reporter Daily Staff Reporter

In the last few decades, incumbent
justices in the Michigan Supreme
Court have typically been reelected,
with only one incumbent judge suf-
fering defeat in about the last 30 years.
But, history aside, what would happen
if Diane Marie Hathaway defeated Jus-
tice Cliff Taylor today?
Simply paying attention to just cam-
paign commercials, there's not much to
go on. Judicial ethics prohibit judges
fromcommenting on pendingcases and
public issues, except when they release
See SUPREME COURT, Page 7

Almost two years of speeches, con-
troversy and campaigning culminates
tonight in a historic election that will
resonate throughout the world.
But then what?
Political Science Prof. Michael
Traugott, who predicts Obama will
win the popular vote by a landslide,
said the first step for either candidate
in office would be to evaluate the econ-
omy and move forward from there.
He said both candidates have focused
on improving the economy, but while
See PRESIDENT, Page 7

THE RIGHT TO VOTE

RELIGION AND POLITICS

Officials warn students Despite discontent, Muslim

of challenges at polls

voters expected to turn out

Both parties expected to
send poll watchers to
local precincts
By JILLIAN BERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
As voters hit the polls for today's high-
ly anticipated election, there's a greater
chance for challenges of voters at polling

stations throughout Michigan.
Kary Moss, executive director of
Michigan's chapter of the American Civil
Liberties Union, said she expects both
Democrats and Republicans to send law-
yers or law students to polling stations
today to challenge the eligibility of vot-
ers.
"We expect that there will be Demo-
cratic and Republican challengers, but
there should also be poll watchers, and
See POLLS, Page 7

Upset by use of Islam to
attack Obama, Muslims
remain focused on election
By CHARLES GREGG-GEIST
Daily StaffReporter
When former U.S. Secretary of State Colin
Powell endorsed Democratic presidential
nominee Barack Obama last month, he cited
an election issue that has troubled many

American Muslim for months.
"It is permitted to be said such things as,
'Well, you know that Mr. Obama is a Muslim.'
Well, the correct answer is, 'He's not a Mus-
lim, he's a Christian,'" Powell said on Meet
the Press on Oct. 19. "But the really right
answer is, 'What if he is?' Is there anything
wrong with being a Muslim in America?"
The Muslim faith has been a prominent
issue throughout the campaign. Polls have
shown that more than 10 percent of Ameri-
cans believe Obama is a Muslim. Even con-
See MUSLIMS, Page 7

WEATHER HI 68
TOMORROW tO 45

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

ON THE BLOGS
Free men's basketball tickets
THEGAME.BLOGS.MICHIGANDAILY.COM

INDEX NEWS... . . . 2 ARTS..............
Vol. CXIX, No. 44 SUDOKU..............................3 CLASSIFIEDS.
P2NN.The.Mi.hi.an..aily OPINION... . . 4 SPORTS..........
michigondoily.com

.......,... . .......5
....... .........8;
... . . .. . . . .

t

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan