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October 30, 2008 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-10-30

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E Ic i an 43aillA

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 30,2008

micuiganaaiiy.com

STATE IEGISLATJRE
Small state
House races
could have
big impact

MAX COLLINS/Dail
South African human rights activist Desmond Tutu was awarded the Wallenberg Medal yesterday at Hill Auditorium. The award is given to distinguished humanitarians.
ActiLvist icon Tutu speaks. at Hill

Democrats have
six-seat advantage
in 110-seat chamber
By LINDY STEVENS
Daily StaffReporter
Young voters could exert their
influence on more than the presi-
dential race this Tuesday. In
Macomb, Oakland, Jackson and
Wayne counties - places that
many University students call
home - are a few highly con-
tested races for the state House of
Representatives.
All 110 seats in the Michigan
House of Representatives are up
for grabs on Nov. 4, and while
often overshadowed by national
campaigns, the outcomes of state
House races often have more
influence on students' everyday
lives than they realize.
"A lot of students are very excit-
ed about the presidential race,
but when it comes to issues that
impact students and their pocket-
books, legislative races are prob-
ably more important," said John

Bebow, executive director of The
Center for Michigan, a centrist
think-tank. "The actions of the
legislature help determine things
like tuition rates, program offer-
ings at universities and economic
policies that help determine the
job market when students gradu-
ate from college."
Down from $363 million in
2002, the University received
$326 million from the state this
year - a decision approved by the
state House in June. Before the
5.6 percent tuition hike approved
by the Board of Regents earlier
this year, University administra-
tors cited declines in state fund-
ing as a reason for the increase.
And with spending beginning
to outpace revenue and the state
in an economic downturn, Bebow
said the future decisions of state
legislators will be some of the
most important in recent history.
"For all residents of the state
right now,the studentvote is more
important than ever," Bebow
said. "We need CEO-quality leg-
islators to navigate some of the
tough times we face in the state,
See LEGISLATURE, Page 3A

Anti-apartheid figure
receives Wallenberg
Medal for life's work
By ELIN BERGMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Human rights activist Des-
mond Tutu delivered the eigh-
teenth annual Wallenberg lecture
at Hill Auditorium last night after

receiving the Wallenberg Medal
from University President Mary
Sue Coleman. The auditorium was
filled to capacity, and broadcast live
to the crowd an overflow room in
the Modern Languages Building.
Tutu, known for his efforts to
promote peace in South Africa dur-
ing the apartheid regime in the
1980s, said he accepted the medal
only "in a representational capac-
ity."
"The people you will want to

honor are the many, many millions
who for a very longtime were anon-
ymous," he said.
Tutu, who worked as a teacher
for three years before becoming
a priest, said political leadership
wasn't something he ever aimed
for.
"I always say I became a leader
by default. The real leaders were
either in prison or in exile or were
under some restriction or other and
I had this platform and the media

for some reason seemed to want to
give me a voice," he said in a press
conference earlier in the day.
Tutu said he's happy to be in the
United States right now because of
the upcoming election. He seemed
to express support for Democratic
presidential candidate Barack
Obama, who is currently ahead in
several national polls.
"If the elections go the way the
polls seem to be indicating, then
See TUTU, Page 3A

Big spending, negative ads fuel election
Candidates and organizations SEEKING SEATS ON THE BENCH
have spent millions to gain
advantage in high court race

Howard Scheps spoke to poll workers Tuesday night about handling potential
record crowds during next week's general election.
City anticipates
record turnout

By TREVOR CALERO
Daily StaffReporter
This year's race for the Michigan Supreme Court
has drawn considerable attention for two key rea-
sons: the vast amounts of money being spent on
advertising, and the negative tone the advertise-
ments have taken.
The election, between Chief Justice Clifford
Taylor, a Republican, and Wayne County Circuit
Judge Diane Hathaway, a Democrat, is expected to
be one of the state's most hotly contested.
Robert Roddis, a Libertarian from Grosse Pointe-
Farms who works as an attorney in private practice,
See SUPREME COURT, Page 7A

CLIFFORD W. TAYLOR
Born: Nov.1942; Flint
Party: Republican
Education: George WashingtonUn-
versity Law School1967, University of
Michigan 1964
Endorsements: Detroit News, Detroit
Free PressNational Rifle Association,
Michigan Chamber of Commerce
Experience: Eleven years on state
Supreme Court. Chief Justice since
25.

DIANE HATHAWAY
Born: Feb.28,1954, Detroit
Party: Democrat
Education: Detroit Collegeof Law
1987. MadonnaCollege1983
Endorsements: Michigan Nurses
Association, United Auto Workers,
Clean Water Action
Experience: Fifteenyears as a judge
on Michigan's 3rd DistrictCircuit
Court

n

sOUR:cTAYLORHATHAWAY, RODDIS CAMPAIGNS

FROZEN IN TIME

Ab(
peo
vo
With
expecte
nationw
pation i
especia
Abou
registe
election
12 per
from 2
fall sex
added
Keep
Beaudr
Election
for vote
. the city
voting

out 13,000 more each precinct by 50 percent.
AtameetingwiththechairsofAnn
ple registered to Arbor's 48 precincts, Beaudry and the
city'selectionsinspectorstrainer,How-
te than in 2004 ardScheps,explained differentscenar-
ios workers could expect on Election
By JULIE ROWE Day, fcusinggmuch of their discussion
Daily Staf}'eporter on issues specific to students.
- - -Beaudry told the precinctccaptains
Tuesday's general election that the University-issued MCard
d to draw record turnout was an acceptable form of ID and that
vide,officialssaid voter partici- voters didn't need to provide a driv-
n Ann Arbor is expected tobe er's license or prove their residency.
llyhigh atstudentprecincts. Student-heavy precincts, she
ut 106,000 residents are said, will likely see the most chal-
red to vote in Tuesday's lenges from poll monitors repre-
n, an increase of more than senting the major political parties.
rcent and 13,000 people Unlike most other polling loca-
004. Since the start of the tions, which are headed by one
mester, 12,000 people were chairperson, precincts that are
to the city's voter rolls. largely comprised of students will
ing those numbers in mind, have two chairs, one of whom will
y'sofficeistakingstepstomake be a lawyer. The goal, Scheps said,
n Day run smoothly as possible is to make the challenge procedure
rrs and poll workers. She said and the voting process move more
has purchased enough new quickly.

PREPARING FOR ELECTION DAY
With political gear
banned, groups'
ready solutions
Voice Your Vote will
provide T-shirts to voters
wearing campaign shirts
By KYLE SWANSON
Daily StaffReporter
After a district judge upheld on Tuesday state legisla-
tion barring voters from wearing campaign gear within
100 feet of a polling place, campus groups are planning
ways to help students who are unaware of the law.
LSA junior Hannah Lieberman, the co-chair of Voice
Your Vote, said the group's volunteers would go to six
campus precincts next Tuesday and lend T-shirts to
voters who wear campaign T-shirts to the polling place.
See CLOTHING, Page 3A

booths to boost the number at

School of Art and Design sophomrores Yonit Olshan and Lauren Sopher remain frozen while people
walk by on the Diag yesterday. The stunt was organized by a "flash mob" that included 70 people.

See TURNOUT, Page 3A

WEATHER I: 50
TOMORROW LU 34

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