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October 27, 2008 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-10-27

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The Michigan Daily- michigandaily.com

October 27, 2008 - 3B

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom October 27, 2008 - 3B

TERRIERS
From Page 1B
similar to Michigan's, but BU sim-
ply looked more prepared.
"It was like we were play-
ing against each other, playing
against ourselves," said BU coach
Jack Parker, who uncharacteristi-
cally didn't show his team film of
the Wolverines before the game.
"Their power play didn't surprise
us. Their penalty kill didn't sur-
prise us."
BU had great puck movement
on the man advantage, cycling the
puck so quickly that the injury-
depleted Michigan unit often col-
lapsed into a small square in front
ofthe goal. The Terriers were often
positioned well inside the circles,
much closer than their usual spot
just inside the blue line.
As a result, BU registered 18
of its 32 shots at very close range,
between the crease and bottoms of
the circles.
But the game's lopsided spe-
cial teams performances had
nothing to do with the number
of power-play opportunities. The
Wolverines had three more man-
advantage chances (12-9) than the
WILDCATS
From Page 1B
score. They had six shots on goal
in the first half, going into the
wind. In the second half, the teams
switched sides, and the Michigan
offense had a significant advan-
tage.
About three minutes into the
second frame, senior Alex Morisset
won a tackle at midfield and got the
ball to redshirt junior Peri Maros-
evic. The Rockford, Ill. native set
up fellow junior Mauro Fuzetti for
the first goal of the night.
"Mauro was special,"Burns said.
"He's a player who can easily blow
by the first and second defenders.
He's seeing the game at a real high
levelrightnow."
After a Northwestern goal, and
almost exactly 30 minutes after his
first, Fuzetti knocked in his second
goal of the night to put the Wolver-

Terriers but converted just twice,
both in the third period.
Michigan's power-play unit
grew frustrated as time went on
and often forced passes through
the core of BU's penalty killers.
Berenson didn't see his team form
any sort of rhythm.
"I can pinpoint two or three
good scoring chances in the game
and that was it," Berenson said.
"You can't win a game like that."
The Wolverines' struggles were
mostly rooted in their transition
game. Michigan frequently turned
over the puck in the neutral zone.
BU controlled the game's two
5-on-3 advantages, even the one
Michigan had. The Terriersscored
during their two-man advantage,
and while they were down by two
men, they shut the Wolverines
down for 64 seconds.
Michigan is the third top-10
team the Terriers have faced this
season.But the Wolverines haven't
played nearly as difficult a sched-
ule, making this weekend's loss a
wakeup call
"Well, we took a step in the
wrong direction," Summers said.
"But we're going to be focused in
Monday's practice and get back at
it."
ines up 2-1.
Then, with a little over nine
minutes to play, redshirt junior
goalkeeper Patrick Sperry booted
a drop kick that carried in the wind
to Northwestern's end line.
Senior Steve Bonnelligotthe ball
and took a shot that his coach said
he "had no business shooting," but
it went into the top of the net to
seal the victory.
With two games left at home
against unranked opponents,
Michigan is positioned to finish
strong heading into the Big Ten
Tournament. Last year, the Wol-
verines collapsed in their confer-
ence game and didn't make NCAAs.
Burns expressed more confidence
in this year's team heading into
postseason play.
"This is essentially the same
team with one more year of experi-
ence," Burns said."They've learned
how to forget the past and focus on
the presentmoment."

TOP: CLIF REEDER, BELOW: SAID ALSALAH/Daily
(TOP) Sophomore defenseman Tristin Llewellyn and the rest of the defensive corps had few reasons to celebrate in Michigan's 7-2 loss to Boston University Saturday.
(BELOW) Sophomore goalie Bryan Hogan was not able to do much more between the pipes than senior Billy Sauer, who was pulled after allowing four goals in two periods.
SanerHoganltup
itBoston. in 7-2 defeat

I i
Blue exits fall
"season early
at regionals

By NICOLE AUERBACH
Daily Sports Writer
BOSTON - The Boston Univer-
sity student section picked up on it
first.
Before the puck dropped to start
the third periodof Saturday's game,
the "Dog Pound" changed the focus
of its harassing chants from senior
goaltender Billy Sauer to sopho-
more Bryan Hogan.
After allowing four goals in the
first two frames, Michigan coach
Red Berenson pulled Sauer.
"I just wanted to try to get a life
back in our team," Berenson said.
"I can't tell you it changed much.
You're looking for ways to change
the game, change the momentum in
the game. You can't pull the whole
team."
After Hogan came in, it appeared
as if Michigan responded positively
to the spark.
Just more than a minute into the
third period, freshman forward
Robbie Czarnik fired a shot from
the right circle over Terrier goal-
tenderKieran Millan's left shoulder
for his first career goal. That made
it 4-1, the closest the Wolverines
would get.
Then, the goalie experiment
failed.
Hogan couldn't quite get a feel
for the game after being thrust into
a hostile crowd of 6,400 screaming
fans. He didn't look as confident as
he did in his three starts this year.

the power play.
"I can't fault our goalies,"
Berenson said. "Our goalie would
have had to absolutely stand on his
head to makea difference on some
of those shots. Our defensemen's
sticks were not where they had to
be."
More than half of Michigan's 13
penalties were called on bluelin-
ers. The already-thin unit strug-
gled to keep up with the Terriers'
relentless offensive attack, which
focused on cycling the puck down
low around the net. They had 32
shots on goal.
Berenson's second-intermission
switch was reminiscent of last
year's Frozen Four goalie swap, in
which Hogan came into the game
after the first period against Notre
Dame. Sauer had let up three
goals on nine shots in the semifi-
nal game. Berenson said then, as
he. did Saturday, that the pull was
about tryingto change momentum
and spark the team.
But for the Wolverines this
weekend, the goalie change didn't
provide positive results: And with
the question marks surrounding
Sauer's big-game abilities already
present, the swap could affect the
senior's confidence and rhythm in
weeks to come.

Wolverines hoping that
doub
to prove last year's matc
.bles
success no fluke in Sula
spring season Tatst
first
soph
By GILAD BERKOWITZ Lind
Daily Sports Writer exiti
Bu
Although there will be no lead
Wolverines in Tuesday's final of rank
the ITA Regional Championship thef
in East Lansing this weekend, Wolv
junior Tania Mahtani and the thiss
Michigan women's tennis team
were pleased with their perfor-
mances.
Mahtani advanced farther
than any other Wolverine in the
event. She ousted Northwestern
freshman Stacy Lee in the first
round in three sets, then cruised
past Purdue junior Tatiana Gan-
zha. She then faced stiff compe-
tition in the third round, losing a
three-setter to Illinois freshman
Chelci Abajian (6-0 4-6 6-1).
"I don't think I had my best day
today," Mahtani said. "My strokes
were not feeling good."
After the loss, Mahtani will-
ingly called her opponent "the
better player."
Michigan coach Ronni Bern-
stein said she believes the team
has plenty to take away from the
individual performances this
weekend.
"The tournament definitely
gave us a good idea of where we
stand," Bernstein said.
Last season, Michigan per-
formed well in Big Ten competi-
tion but failed to advance past the
second round of the NCAA Tour-
nament.
To improve last year's finish,
the ladies will need to step up in
doubles. With a completely new
doubles lineup, the chemistry
isn't there yet, but the team hopes
it can find the right combinations
before the spring season.
Bernstein said starting the sea-
son with new talent at the bottom
of the lineup is difficult, adding

she will probably shuffle the
'les lineup before the next
ch. In East Lansing, the dou-
team of freshman Michelle
lhian and sophomore Rika
uno was eliminated in the
round and the tandem of
omore Kari Wig and senior
sey Howard made an early
in the second.
ut behind the great vocal
ers of Mahtani and 30th-
ed senior Chisako Sugiyama,
future looks bright for the
verines to make some noise
spring.

He gave up three goals on just
nine shots in the third period Sat-
urday night.
Berenson has alternated starts
between the two goalies this sea-
son. He started Hogan last Thurs-
day against Niagara because he felt
the more-experienced Sauer could
handle the pressure of a road game
better.
But Sauer didn'tlook comfortable
in net, especially after giving up his
first goal. BU forward Kevin Gilroy
tipped the puck into the net after it
bounced off Sauer's chest with five
minutes remaining in the opening
period to open the scoring.
"The first goal obviously was
a big goal," Berenson said. "It
wasn't a great scoring chance, but

it was a bad rebound."
Sauer ranked fifth in the nation
last year with a 1.95 goals against
average. So far this season, he's
given up three, one and four goals
in his starts. Scores have often
come off easy rebounds or sloppy
scrambles around the net.
Although the first goal of Satur-
day's game wasn't pretty, the oth-
ers came off what Berenson called
"tic-tac-toe plays." BU relied on a
combination of speed, quick pass-
ing and strong stickwork in front
of the net to score, especially on

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