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October 22, 2008 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-10-22

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DUBYA'S WARS
a gan's Stone's latest political drama is
a story of presidential battles
within and without.
See Arts, Page 5A

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

michigandaily.com

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING GROWS UP

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Minority
enrollment
dips for
2008 class

'U' sees slight drop
in first full cycle
after Proposal 2
By CHRIS HERRING
Managing NewsEditor
The number of underrepre-
sented minorities in the Universi-
ty's 2008 freshman class dropped
slightly from the previous year,
according to final enrollment
statistics released earlier this
week. The numbers indicate that
the University avoided drops in
minority enrollment seen at other
universities - after -their states

implemented bans on the use of
affirmative action in admissions.
The proportion of underrepre-
sented minorities in the incoming
classwas10.4 percent, down from
10.8 percent in the 2007 class.But
since 2006, the last year before
the ban took effect, the number
of underrepresented minorities
- those who classify themselves
as black, Hispanic or Native
Americans - at the University has
dropped by 8 percent.
The 2008 group is the first
whole class to be admitted since
the passage of Proposal 2, a ballot
initiative that banned the use of
race- andgender-based preferenc-
See ENROLLMENT, Page 3A

Leasing season is fast upon us,
and with the influx of new devel-
opments near campus like Zara-
gon Place, 4 Eleven lofts and The
Courtyards entering the fray, the
housing field is larger than ever.
In the special real estate issue of
The Statement, the Daily investi-
gates why the near-campus hous-
ing market is experiencing its

biggest boom in years despite an
economic downturn nationwide.
How will luxury lofts affect tra-
ditional student neighborhoods?
And will students go in for pric-
ier amenities?
A full-color center spread show-
cases some of the best spaces
available to rent. Original Victo-
rian murals, a renovated church

and a house that comes equipped
with a flat-screen TV and stereo
system - you'll kick yourself for
paying just as much for your stu-
dent-ghetto dive.
Then check out a feature on cam-
pus's time-honored party houses
and a personal essay about the
risks of renting. FOR MORE, SEE
THE STATEMENT, PAGE1C

* RACE FOR THE BOARD OF REGENTS
Ilitch touts business expertise

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION BANS: BEFORE AND AFTER
The University of Michigan had a smaller decrease in minority undergraduate
enrollment in the first full admissions cycle after the passage of an affirmative
action ban than its California peers, which dealt with similar laws.
AFRICAN HISPANIC NATIVE
AMERICAN AMERICAN
30%
20%
m 10
Z
H i

Detroit executive,
lawyer one of two
Democratic hopefuls
By CAITLIN SCHNEIDER
Daily StaffReporter
As Election Day approaches,
Denise Ilitch, a candidate for the
University of Michigan Board of
S Regents, is spending much of her
time meeting with voters. The

Democrat said she enjoys getting
her message
out and field- -
ing questions
- even when
it means get- ^
ting back to the , -
basics.
"It's by far
the most often -
asked question: ILITCH
'What does a
regent do," she said. "The second
question I'm asked is, 'Why are you

doingthis?'"
The pursuit of the role of a regent
might seem like a departure from
Ilitch's entrepreneurial-oriented
career as a lawyer, magazine pub-
lisher and jewelry designer, but she
says the position would allow herto
work on issues that matter to her.
"Most importantly, I'm a mom,"
said Ilitch. "I have three young
adults. I am very concerned about
the rising cost of tuition and how
it's impacting our kids. I'd like to
keep Michigan kids in Michigan

and make education as affordable
as possible."
If elected, Ilitch said her main
concern would be offsetting the
rise in tuition costs by finding new
revenue streams for the University,
along with making University oper-
ations more efficient, cutting costs
and fundraising.
Ilitch said she also wants to seek
out business opportunities in grow-
ing technology industries and with
the University's athletic teams.
See CANDIDATE, Page 7A

0

Before After Before After Before After
UNIVERSITY OF U.CALIFORNIA- U. CALIFORNIA-
MICHIGAN LOS ANGELES BERKELEY
sOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, UNIVERSIT Y OF CALIFORNIA

Council approves complex, subsidy
City offers $8.87 million in tax
reimbursements for planned
601 Forest apartment building
By THOMAS CHAN
Daily StaffReporter
The Ann Arbor City Council unanimously approved
plans for a 14-story apartment building near campus
Monday night, ending about 10 months of negotia-
tions on the project."
The vote was the final step required at the city"
level before construction could begin on the 601 For-
est complex, to be located at the intersection of South=
University Avenue and South Forest Street.
When the original plan for the complex was put
" forth, city residents expressed concern with the
apartment's proposed height - 25 stories - saying it
would be too tall for the area it became part of. Others
voiced criticism about the traffic and congestion theT
building could cause in an already busy area.
While the plans for the building itself were easily SALD A LSALAH/Oaey
passed Monday, discussion about a resolution propos- Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje speaks at Monday night's Ann Arbor City Council meeting, at which the
See APARTMENTS, Page 7A body unanimously approved plans for 601 Forest, a 14-story apartment near campus.

UNIVERSITY HOUSING
Students displaced
after Markley fire

Fire damages one
room, sprinklers
damage others
By TREVOR CALERO
Daily StaffReporter
Six University students were
displaced from their rooms Mon-
day night after a fire broke out in
the Mary Markley Residence Hall.
The Ann Arbor Fire Depart-
mentresponded tothe call at about
10:40 p.m., but by that time the fire
had already been contained by the
hall's sprinkler system, officials
said. No one was injured.
University Housing Director
Peter Logansaid the fire is believed
to have started when a small elec-
tric fan short-circuited in a room
on the 6th floor of Fisher House.
Housingstaffimmediately evac-
uated about350 students who were

still in thehall over fallbreak.
Though most people were
allowed back in their rooms
within an hour, six students were
forced to relocate for the night
because of significantwater dam-
age to their rooms, Logan said.
The residence hall sustained
no smoke damage beyond the
room where the fire started, but
many rooms on the 4th, 5th and
6th floor experienced water dam-
age, Logan said.
"It was approximately 33
rooms and a lounge that had had
either significant or even minor
water infiltration," Logan said.
"The water cleanup crew worked
through the remainder of the
morning. They are confident that
nearly all of the water-affected
rooms, with the exception of the
fire room, will be habitable bythe
end of the day."
Logan said allthe students who
See FIRE, Page 7A

WEATHER HI: 57
TOMORROW LO 38

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INDEX NEWS................2A CLASSIFIEDS............6A
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