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October 17, 2008 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-10-17

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8 - Friday, October 17, 2008

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

ARTS IN BRIEF

Music
Veteran indie rockers return
with five-track EP that hints
at a promising future
Antony & the Johnsons
"Another World"
Secretly Canadian
Antony & the Johnsons has been a fixture of the
New York City indie scene since the late 1990s and
has since emerged as one of the city's more visible
performers - and not just because frontman Ant-
ony Hegarty is transgendered. Airy and majestic,
the band uses a wide range of instruments, from
cello to horns to violin, along with the standard
guitar, bass and drums setup. The band's most
recent EP, Another World, precedes its upcom-
ing full-length The Crying Light, due out in Jan.
2009.

The short but sincere disc opens with its title
track "Another World." The cut is bare and reso-
nating, with Antony's deep voice hovering over
unadorned piano keys. This calculated simplicity
highlights the song's sad lament as Antony mourns
the loss of the world around him: "Still have too
many dreams, never seen the light / I need anoth-
er place, a place where I can go." Though utterly
down-lifting, the track contains a certain marked
charm despite its depressing nature.
The more upbeat "Shake That Devil" opens with
a short, non-musical intro, simply showcasingAnt-
ony's sing-song vocals over slight distortion before
a consistent drumline and full band carry the song
forward. A saxophone solo is one of the better
moments, imbuing the track with a more playful
flair than any of the EP's other selections.
With Another World, Antony and the John-
sons prove they have not lost their ability to cre-
ate resplendent works of art, and the disc is an
encouraging preview of what their future collec-
tions have to offer.
SASHA RESENDE

The '70s were a scary time.

THE KALAMAZOO
NATURE CENTER
IS PLEASED TO WELCOME
RICHARD Louv
AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR OF
"LAST CHILD IN THE WOODS:
SAVING OUR CHILDREN FROM
NATURE DEFICIT DISORDER"
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22
7:30 PM
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
MSU CONCERT AUDITORIUM
(Farm Lane at Auditorium Road)
Admission FREE with ticket.
Ticketsavailab e at the
Wharton Center Box office or contact:
lpanich@aturecenter.org
(269) 381-1574 ext. 38

Blast of the past

Co
b

The
impor
standc
allthe
floodir
time.
takes
tricky
used
- tim
bad
psych
- and
refresl
viewer
"Lif
tive S
by Jas
Shorty
colleai
Bonet,
while
Tyleri
wakes
office,
collea
some
ing De

p drama flashes Ray Carling, played by Jonathan
Murphy ("October Road") and the
)ack to the'70s amazing Michael Imperioli ("The
Sopranos"). The boss of this bois-
By JAMIE BLOCK terous team, and a quick enemy of
DailyArts Writer Detective Tyler, isLieutenantGene
Hunt, played by the suitably dark
latest British television and gruesome Harvey Keitel ("Be
t, "Life on Mars," manages to Cool"). Tyler, as the only detective
out among who isn't extremely sexist, quickly
copshows befriends the office's psychologist
ng prime- * Annie Norris (Gretchen Mol, "3:10
The show to Yuma") and shares a less-than-
on soe sutle sxualtension with her.
and over- Thursdays The cast is incredibly strong
concepts at10 p.m. - one of the strongest in any
ne travel, ABC primetime lineup - but, sadly, the
cops and writing isn't. The writers struggle
oanalysis to stay in the '70s: While some
mixes them into something lines fit perfectly in 1973, many
hsingly new for American others seem straight out of tle 'Sns
rs. and '60s, especially insults and
fe on Mars" follows Detec- sexist comments. These remarks
am Tyler, played superbly also come up far more often than
on O'Mara ("The Agency"). necessary. Even before the time
y after his girlfriend and jump, the romance between Tyler
gue Maya Daniels (Lisa and Daniels lacks any originality,
"High Fidelity") is killed though it's acted very well.
tracking a murder suspect, The plot of the show keeps
is hit by a yp ding, car and the viewer guessing on a num-
up in 1973. Upon visiting his ber of levels. "Mars" drops some
Tyler finds that his modern clues that Tyler is in a coma and
gues have been replaced by other hints that his experience is
chauvinist "pigs," includ- really happening. Not only is the
etectives Chris Skelton and suspense of this back-and-forth

compelling, but it introduces a
lot of psychological questions.
A particularly well-shot scene
shows Tyler looking 360-degrees
around him, questioning whether
his mind could really invent all
these people and details. These
questions bring Tyler and Norris
closer together as she tries to con-
vince him that she and everyone
else around him are more than
just figments of his imagination.
it's initially unclear why exactly *
Tyler was sent to this time in his-
tory, but this is slowly answered
as he discovers clues in 1973 that
he could've used to save Daniels.
Sometimes, however, these clues
seem a bit far-fetched, even for a
show with time travel.
One of the show's greatest suc-
cesses is its amazing soundtrack.
The show takes its name from the
David Bowie song "Life on Mars,"
which plays at a few crucial story
moments. "Mars" also features
tracks by The Who and The Roll-
ing Stones. The lyrics are seam-
lessly integrated into the plot and
the songs as a whole add to the cool
'70s aura.
"Life on Mars"doesn'tjuststand
out among cop shows, it stands out
among primetime, network televi-
sion.

0

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