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September 18, 2008 - Image 1

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4Making art
with your food

Our sex and relationships
columnist's debut
The B-side Opinion, Page 4A

Iie lidigar Bailjj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, September 18, 2008

michigandailycom

MICHIGAN S ECONOMIC WOES
Candidates
pitch fixes
for rising
joblessness

Thomas Friedman, a New York Times columnist, spoke yesterday at Eastern Michigan University yesterday to promote his new book and draw attention to the energy crisis.
Fried-man calls for focus on ener

Unemployment rate
in Michigan has
risen to 8.9 percent,
highest since 1992
From staff and 'wire reports
If the dramatic decline in the
stockmarketinrecent dayswasn't
enough, the financial outlook for
the state just got bleaker.
Michigan's unemployment
rate rose to 8.9 percent in August
- the highest it's been since 1992
- according to a monthly report
released yesterday. Until August,
the unemployment rate had been
steady at 8.5 percent for the past
three months, the worst in the
nation. The national jobless rate
for August is 6.1 percent, up from
5.7 percent in July.
' The state lost another 20,000
manufacturing jobs last month.
Michigan has 40,000 fewer man-
ufacturing jobs since last year.
With economic anxiety ris-

ing, presidential candidates
John McCain and Barack Obama
scrambled Wednesday to adjust
their messages to connect with
voters who are struggling finan-
cially.
McCain, the Republican nomi-
nee, toured Michigan yester-
day, promising to help revitalize
Michigan's economy if elected
president.
At a campaign rally in Grand
Rapids, he said he and running
mate Sarah Palin would help
recapture the state's image as the
world's automotive capital.
"The working people of this
great state of Michigan are the
hardest working, the best skilled,
the most productive, the most
competitive inthe world, and they
are the backbone and the founda-
tion of our economy," he said.
While speaking to about 100
workers at the Orion Township
plant in Oakland County, he said
he backed a plan in Congress to
give automakers $25 billion in
federal loans to help them retool
See UNEMPLOYMENT, Page 7A

New York Times
columnist says U.S.
should be the one to
solve energy crisis
TREVOR CALERO
and A. BRAD SCHWARTZ
Daily StaffReporters
Speaking before a group of lead-
ing alternative energy company
representatives at Eastern Michi-
gan University yesterday, New
York Times columnist Thomas L.

Friedman called for an "energy'
technology revolution," saying
whichever country solves the ener-
gy crisis could reap huge economic
benefits in the process.
The event, organized by the
Michigan Business Review, Washt-
enaw Economic Club and the state's,
University Research Corridor also
featured remarks from University
President Mary Sue Coleman and
Michigan State University Presi-
dent Lou Anna Simon.
Friedman's visit was part of a
publicity tour for his new book,
"Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We
Need a Green Revolution - and

How It Can Renew America." In
the book, Friedman outlines what
he considers the five major energy
problems of the 21st century: ener-
gy and natural resources supply
and demand, petrodictatorship, cli-
mate change, energy poverty and
biodiversity loss.
Friedman cited the informa-
tion technology revolution in the
late 1990s while describing how
big a change would be necessary to
handle the world's environmental
problems.
"(Energy technology), to emerge,
has to compete with existing cheap,
dirty alternatives that are already

in the market," he said. "And unless
you have a government that shapes
the market differently, you will not
get this green revolution in scale, at
least not at the speed and scope that
we need."
Friedman said a nation could
see enormous financial returns if
it were to find a plausible environ-
mental solution.
"Is America going to lead it, or
is Japan going to lead it, China,
India?" he asked. "That country
has to be the United States of Amer-
ica."
Near the end of the event, Cole-
See FRIEDMAN, Page 7A

LEADER OF THE PACK
Michigan's unemployment rate recently reached its highest point since 1992.

12r

Israeli pol:'We must seek justice'

10l

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Eldad first-ever
Knesset member
to speak at'U'
By BETH WITTENSTEIN
Daily StaffReporter
In the first lecture ever
delivered on the University's
campus by a member of the
Israeli Parliament, Knesset
member Aryeh Eldad stook
a hardline stance defending
Israel's current boundaries.
"We must end the occu-
pation of Arabs on the land
of Israel," he said before 150
people in a talk at the Michi-
gan Union last night. "We

must seek justice. We must
protect what is ours."
Eldad, a member of the
National Union-National
Religious Party and chair-
man of the Knesset's ethics
committee, said he thinks
the notion of separate Israe-
li and Palestinian states
has hit a dead end and that
Arabs should learn to live in
an Israeli state. He said the
problem is that Arabs are
unwilling to accept a Jewish
state in the world.
"A lot of our leaders fooled
themselves, (saying) that the
conflict is territorial and if
we give them some land, we
can get some peace," said
Eldad, who was a general in

the Israeli Defense Force and
the director of plastic sur-
gery at Hadassah Hospital
from 2000 to 2003.
Eldad used his back-
ground in medicine to illus-
trate his points.
"As a physician," he said,
"I can say if you misdiagnose
the disease, the chance you'll
be able to prescribe the right
medication is very slim."
Eldad said he's performed
surgery on several terror-
ism victims, but also suicide
bombers.
He said the use of suicide
bombers illustrates that Pal-
estinians have fundamen-
tally different values from
See ISRAEL, Page 7A

6
4

Michigan
United Stales
- ~°t?

1 I 1 1 _1

21
1985

i

1989 1993 1997 2001 2005 2008
MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT Or LABOR AND ECONOMIC GRoWTH

MAX cOLUcNS/Daiy
Professor Arieh Eldad, afar-right member of the Israeli parlia-
ment, spoke at the Michigan Union yesterday: He said Israel
shouldn't cede any territory to the Palestinians.

MICHIGAN DIFFERENCES
Segregation isn't just black and white, panelists say

UNIE RSITY RESEARCH
Prof. named top
Air Force scientist
Engineering air staff meeting," he said. "From
that point on, every day is differ-
researcher to take ent."
Dahm's duties will.include
one-year absence visiting laboratories around
from University ;hetworld,
y present-
ing research
By KELLY FRASER and deciding
Daily News Editor which proj-
ects to pursue.
At the University, Aerospace With a
engineering Prof. Werner Dahm $24 billion
conducts research on combustion research bud- DAHM
and fluid dynamics. get and anoth-
Soon, he'll be taking his sci- er $34 billion for acquisitions
entific expertise to the United this fiscal year, Dahm noted, the
States Air Force as the organiza- Air Force's budget is larger than
tion's chief scientist. many auto companies.
As a top Air Force adviser, He said he will miss teaching
Dahm will provide officials with and working on research projects
updates on the branch's research at the University, but couldn't
and development projects. pass up the position.
"Every morning, there is an See DAHM, Page 7A

By EMMY KIRKSEY
For theDaily
When people think of segrega-
tion, they usually think about race,
but a large group discussion in the
Michigan League last night sug-
gested the issue goes far beyond
that.
About 70 people attended the
discussion, held in the Pendleton
Room and hosted by the Universi-
ty's chapter of Iota Phi Theta.
The conversation, titled "Seg-
regation: It this the Michigan Dif-
ference?" centered on other types

of segregation based on gender,
sexual orientation, socioeconomic
status and religion.
"People don'trealizethatself-seg-
regation is not just black and white,"
said LSA junior Mychael Fields, the
secretary of Iota Phi Theta and one
of the event's organizers. "It may be
defined by your religion, socioeco-
nomic status, or any quality that falls
under social justice."
Iota Phi Theta invited people
from many other campus organiza-
tions representing several different
ethnic groups.
"One of the reasons our .pro-

gram is different from any other
program is because of its perspec-
tive," said Ayodele Alli, former Iota
Phi Theta president and.School of
Information graduate student. "We
brought together people who are
usually discussed in conversations
about segregation but never get the
chance to be in the room."
Moderators pressed participants
on why race overshadows other
characteristics.
"We encouraged people to not
look atsegregation through the lens
of black and white," Allisaid.
Among the topics discussed

was gender. Many in the crowd
expressed dissatisfaction with the
divisions betweenmen and women
on campus.
"Gender roles are engrained into
our culture. It happens at birth,"
LSA senior Ashley Lewis said.
Some audience members agreed
that gender segregation is only
given attention when a person
chooses not to conform to tradi-
tional gender roles.
Event organizers said a similar
forum will be held later in the year
to continue the discussion that
began yesterday.

TOMORROW'S
WEATHER

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INDEX NEW ...............2A SPORTSA............................ A
Vol. CXVIV, No 13 SUDOKU.. . . . 3A CLASSIFIEDS. ..A...... ..6A
02008 The Michigan Daily OPINION. . . . 4A THE B-SIDE. . . 1B
michigandaily coo P N O .............. A T E B S D .............1

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