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January 11, 2008 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-01-11

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2 - Friday, January 11, 2008

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY:

MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

TUESDAY:
Arbor Anecdotes

PUPPET PERFORMANCE

WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
The Extremist Explained BeforeYu Were Here
A e g EEGEOFReAiLROAD JACK e
Areneg~a e renaissance man

In the 1920s and early 30s, Ann
Arbor owed much of its local color
to the frequent presence of the
man known to students only as
"Railroad Jack."
Over the years Railroad Jack
gained a following that included
the Washington Post, Chicago
Tribune and The New York Times
- all of which wrote about Jack's
visits to their respective cities.
It was Ann Arbor, however, that
earned the distinction of being
called his "headquarters."
In "The Making of the Univer-
sity of Michigan: 1817-1992," for-
mer University Professor Howard
Peckham writes that "Jack" was
born in Wisconsin around 1854
as Harry Cooper, but took up his
better-known moniker while
working as a writer for a railroad
periodical.
In his youth, Railroad Jack

spent time as a journalist and
publisher in Chicago. According
to Peckham, he made his living for
most of his life using his remark-
able memory for historical facts.
After he left his publishing busi-
ness in Chicago, Jack never had a
permanent home.
The self-described "World's
Champion History Expert"
assembled crowds on campus and
invited onlookers to shout out
dates in history he didn't know.
In addition to passing around a
collectionplate,he would oftenbet
against the crowd, daring them to
stump him. On some occasions he
even accosted students and pro-
fessors as they filed out of classes
to take his challenge.
While the Post estimated Coo-
per knew biographical details for
500 historical figures, other arti-
cles of the time report him boast-

SAM WOLSON/Daily
Under the direction of theater artist Dan Hurlin, School of Art
seniors Michelle Panars, Karen Hoenke and Wesley animate a
puppet yesterday in the Michigan Theater.
CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Steak, shrimp Purse snatched Presentation on
salad stolen from from Children's human rights
West Quad Hospital issues

WHERE: West Quad
WHEN: Wednesday at about
2 p.m.
WHAT: A steak and a shrimp
salad were stolen from a refrig-
erator in the food service area
in West Quad, the Department
of Public Safety reported. Police
are investigating the case but
have no suspects.
Driver hits
parked car
WHERE: Lot M-15, North
Medical Campus
WHEN: Wednesday at about 7
a.m-.
WHAT: A driver hit a parked
car while leavinglot M-15, DPS
reported. No one was injured in
the accident. Both cars suffered
minor body damage and paint
scratches.

WHERE: Maternal & Child
Health Center, C.S. Mott Chil-
dren's Hospital
WHEN: Wednesday at about 6
a.m.
WHAT: A purse was stolen
from the Children's Hospital,
DPS reported. A debit card was
reported stolen from the purse.
DPS has no suspects.
Wallet taken
from Markley
Hall
WHERE: Mary Markley Hall
WHEN: Wednesday at about 3
a.m.
WHAT: A student's wallet was
stolen from Mary Markley Hall,
DPS reported. The wallet con-
tained $40 in cash. DPS has no
suspects.

WHAT: University of Wis-
consin Political Science Prof.
Leigh Payne will discuss her
book about political recon-
ciliation and human rights
violations.
WHO: Center for Inter-
national and Comparative
Study
WHEN: Today at noon
WHERE: Room 2022, 202S.
Thayer St.
Chinese history
discussion
WHAT: A discussion by Chi-
nese theater scholar Claire
Conceison on the visits of
photographer Inge Morath
and writer Arthur Miller to
China. Conceison will also
discuss the 1983 performance

of Miller's play "Death of a
Salesman" in Beijing.
WHO:sCenter for Chinese
Studies
WHEN: Today at 5 p.m.
WHERE: 4th floor, Rackham
Graduate School
Lecture by
civil rights
activist
WHAT: Carl Mack, a former
director of the National Soci-
ety of Black Engineers and
NAACP official, will speak
to the University's chapter of
the National Society of Black
Engineers.
WHO: National Society of
Black Engineers
WHEN: Today from 5:30
p.m.
WHERE: Stamps Auditori-
um, Walgreen Drama Center
CORRECTIONS
OPlease report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

ing of memorizing more than
5,000 persons and 10,000 impor-
tant dates.
Cooper also flaunted his abil-
ity to identify the key of a popular
hymn when he heard it played.
Peckham writes that Cooper
began his travels - mostly by train
- in 1895, but a 1908 article says
that he had already been "spiel-
ing" for 26 years.
In 1933, Cooper was found dead
of heart failure outside of Coldwa-
ter, Mich., at the age of 79, accord-
ing to The Associated Press. The
Times printed that he had left his
body to the University Medical
School for research, but Peckham
writes that a University Pastor
claimed the body and had Jack
buried in a local Catholic cem-
etery.
CHARLES GREGG-GEIST
T H ETHNSYOU
Arizona governor and
Republican presidential
candidate John McCain
will be speaking at a town
hall meeting at Clawson High
School in Clawson, Michigan,
at 3:45 p.m. tomorrow. McCain
comes to Michigan on the back
of a primary victory in New
Hampshire on Tuesday.
The Michigan women's
basketball team lost to
Purdue yesterday, mark-
ing their 18th straight loss to
the Boilermakers. The Wolver-
ines lost a lead going into the
final two minutes of the game.
>>>FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS PAGE8
The British government
announced yesterday
that citizens are no lon-
ger allowed to keep elephants
as pets, The Guardian report-
ed. A 12-year-old British boy
has started a national petition
to reverse the law. The petition
has over 650 signatures so far.

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0

6

Medical research opens up
targets for AIDS drugs

Discovery could lead called the Harvard team's work
"elegantscience," but added a cau-
to improved virus tion.
"It remains to be seen if any of
treatment these proteins they identified are
useful clinically," Fauci said. "This
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. is hypothesis-generating, not
The New York Times hypothesis-solving. It creates a lot
of work -- someone has to go down
Using a new type of genetic each of these pathways."
screen, researchers at Harvard The lead author on the paper,
Medical School have identified Dr. Stephen J. Elledge, is a geneti-
273 proteins that the AIDS virus cist, and this is his first work on the
needs to survive in human cells, human immunodeficiency virus,
opening up new potential targets which causes AIDS. His previous
for drugs. work has been on cancer, Elledge
Their work, published online said, trying to figure out how cells
yesterday by Science magazine, sense when their chromosomes
used RNA interference to screen are broken, and this paper was a
thousands of protein-making collaborative effort.
genes; previously, scientists had "I can't even grow HIV in my
identified only 36 human proteins lab," Elledge said, so he had to use
that the virus uses to break into virus grown by Dr. Judy Lieber-
cells, hijack their machinery and man, director of the medical
start reproducing. school's AIDS division and one of
"This is just terrific work," said the co-authors.
Dr. Robert C. Gallo, director of the Elledge's team used a library of
Institute of Human Virology at the tens of thousands of different short
University of Maryland and a co- interfering RNAs, bits of genetic
discoverer of the virus. "I think it's code -- each of which, when intro-
destined to be one of the top papers duced into a cell, knocks out the
in this field for the decade." cell's ability to make a single pro-
Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director tein.
of the National Institute of Allergy Next, about 21,000 samples of
and Infectious Diseases and the cells, each crippled in its ability to
government's top AIDS expert, produce one protein, were placed

in separate wells on laboratory
plates and dosed with the virus.
If the virus could not reproduce
normally in a given well, it sug-
gested that the missing protein
was one of those it needed.
Of the 273 human proteins iden-
tified, only 36 had been previously
found by other methods.
The virus, which is itself only
a short string of genetic material
inside a protective capsule, can
make only 15 proteins, so it has to
adopt human proteins to its own
use.
The advantage of targeting
human proteins is that the virus
would presumably not be able to
mutate to avoid drugs that block
them, Elledge said. Right now,
virus strains evolve resistance to
anti-retroviral drugs,which attack
the 15 proteins made by the virus
itself, like reverse transcriptase
and protease. The mutations force
AIDS patients to switch drug regi-
mens -- not always successfully.
The disadvantage is that block-
ing human proteins can, obvi-
ously, be fatal to humans. But, as
Gallo pointed out, cancer therapy
works that way -- doctors try to
block proteins that feed fast-grow-
ing tumor cells without killing too
many other fast-growing cells, like
those in the bone marrow.

0

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U

U.S. to issue more secure driver's
licenses to deter counterfeiting

New IDs created to
deter terrorists,
illegal immigrants
WASHINGTON (AP) - Ameri-
cans born after Dec. 1, 1964, will
have to get more secure driver's
licenses in the next six years under
ambitious post-9/11 security rules
to be unveiled today by federal
officials.
The Homeland Security Depart-
ment has spent years crafting the
final regulations for the REAL
ID Act, a law designed to make it
harder for terrorists, illegal immi-
grants and con artists to get gov-

ernment-issued identification.
The effort once envisioned
to take effect in 2008 has been
pushed back in the hopes of win-
ning over skeptical state officials.
Even with more time, more fed-
eral help and technical advances,
REAL ID still faces stiff opposi-
tion from civil liberties groups.
To address some of those con-
cerns, the government now plans
to phase in a secure ID initiative
that Congress passed into law in
2005. Now, DHS plans a key dead-
line in 2011, and then further mea-
sures to be enacted three years
later, according to congressional
staffers who spoke to The Asso-
ciated Press on condition of ano-

nymity because an announcement
had not yet been made.
Without discussing details,
Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff promoted the
final rules for REAL ID during a
meeting Thursday with an advi-
sory council.
"We worked very closely with
the states in terms of developing a
plan that I think will be inexpen-
sive, reasonable to implement and
produce the results,"hesaid. "This
is a win-win. As long as people use
driver's licenses to identify them-
selves for whatever reason there's
no reason for those licenses to be
easily counterfeited or tampered
with."

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