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April 10, 2008 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-04-10

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mlIE Midigan Bail
ONE.HND.ED.EIGT11 EEN A .YEAS O ITO dI \ I. I

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, April 10, 2008

COURSE REGISTRATION
Faced with
early class,
B-schoolers
get crafty
Students have bribed and
begged classmates to swap for
their morning classes
By SUZY VULJEVIC
Daily StaffReporter
Most students will go to great lengths to avoid early-
morning classes, but faced with a Ross School of Busi-
ness policy that automatically assigns students to the
program's required courses, Business School students
have grown particularly crafty.
In order to avoid missing sleep for core courses
like accounting and economics, some Business School
undergraduates have resorted to bribing fellow stu-
dents to swap for later class times.
"People have offered cookies to unconditional love
to monetary compensation for switching classes,"
Business School junior John Lu said. "The funniest is
when people are honest and they tell you straight up
that they don't want to wake up at 8:30 a.m."
A newsletter sent to students last week warned
See REGISTRATION, Page SA

A TANGO TO REMEMBER

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Students
push for
new race
option
Students of North African,
Middle Eastern descent ask for
own check box on applications
By ANDY KROLL
Daily NewsEditor
Project: Check It, a group of current and former
students, is pushing the University to add the category
"North African/Middle Eastern" to the race and eth-
nicity section of admissions applications for all Uni-
versity programs, departments, schools and colleges.
The group, which is lobbying for a similar addition
to the University of Minnesota Law School's appli-
cation, won the unanimous support of the Michigan
Student Assembly Tuesday night, recommending
that "North African/Middle Eastern" be added to any
application questions regarding racial or ethnic back-
ground.
Sirene Abou-Chakra, a University alum, said she
and Mahmoud Fadlallah, another alum, started the
group because they didn't think Arab-Americans or
students of North African descent could identify with
any of the existing choices on the University's applica-
tion.
She said adding a "North African/Middle Eastern"
category would offer Arab and North African students
- who often check the "Caucasian/White" or "Race
not included above" box - a more accurate category
with which to identify. Currently, the University's
undergraduate admissions application allows stu-
dents to choose between "African-American/Black,"
See APPLICATIONS, Page SA

Aleric Soans and Rackham student Solveig Heinz tango at Indefnidos Pero Unidos, the 8th Annual Latin oC
at the Mendelssohn Theater yesterday night. Both dancers are part of the University's Argentine Tango Clk

ACADEMIA'S LIBERAL SLANT
Horowitz: Students not exposed
to diverse viewpoints in college

U' gymnast at the head of
her class (of high schoolers)

Small crowd, no
protest as author
decries radical Islam
in lecture on campus
By ESHWAR
THIRUNAVUKKARASU
Daily StaffReporter
Controversial author and outspo-
ken critic of Islam David Horowitz
denounced both radical Islam and
what he called a liberal bias in col-
lege classrooms during an on-cam-
pus lecture last night.
Horowitz's appearance, spon-
sored by the University's chapter

of Young Americans for Freedom,
drew a crowd of about 40 support-
ers and a handful of critics to an
auditorium in the Modern Lan-
guage Building.
Horowitz is the editor of the
conservative web publication
FrontPage Magazine and speaks
regularly about the Israeli-Pales-
tinian conflict and issues of aca-
demic freedom. His visit to campus
was a part of National Radical
Islam Awareness Week, an event
Horowitz created to spread the
view against what he calls "Islamo-
fascism." Young Americans for
Freedom is hosting several on-
campus events in conjunction with
the week.
Six police officers and a per-

sonal bodyguard stood alert
throughout Horowitz's lecture,
but the event proceeded without
disturbance.
Horowitzdenounced the Univer-
sity's Muslim Students' Association
and the Council on American-
Islamic Relations, calling them
arms of jihadist movements that
have fueled militant groups such as
Hezbollah and Hamas.
"The Muslim Students' Asso-
ciation is not an ethnic group," he
said. "It is not a religious group. It is
not a cultural group. It is a political
organization created by the Muslim
brotherhood.
LSA sophomore Salimah
Mohamed, outreach chair of the
See HOROWITZ, Page 5A

All-American Bruck,
an education major,
in training as gym
teacher at Pioneer
By NICOLE AUERBACH
Daily Sports Writer
Twenty-two high schoolers lay
down on the gym floor intwo equal
rows, heads touching toes. At the
end of a line, one girl passed a vol-
leyball from her feet to the feet of
the boy next to her. Then an orange
cone. Then a baseball.
The kids laughed when the
baseball dropped and rolled all the
way across the gym.
Miss Bruck smiled and told
them to try again, but this time
they weren't allowed to swivel
their bodies around to face each
other.
Twenty minutes later, after
more sweat and frustration, the
bell rang, signaling the end of
first hour. The kids went off to the
locker rooms to change and attend
other classes.
For the teacher, Michigan gym-
nast Lindsey Bruck, it's also just
the first class of the day. To fufill
the student-teaching requirements
for her physical education major,
the fifth-year senior teaches sever-
al high-school physical education
classes every week at Pioneer High
School in Ann Arbor.
Bruck is currently working
with two classes of students tak-
ing a required fitness class. Twice
a week, the students work in the

GENDER-NEUTRAL HOUSING
As schools reform dorms 'U' holds out

Nine schools started
offering gender-blind
housing this year
By JILLIAN BERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Finding the right roommate can
be a difficult task. A night owl and
an early riser might not be the best
fit, while a studious person prob-
ably wouldn't want to live with an
aspiring rock star. But can students
of the opposite sex live together in

harmony?
In recent years, more and more
colleges across the country have
tried to make it work.
This year, top schools like Stan-
ford University and Dartmouth
College have joined a list of about 20
colleges nationwide offering gen-
der-neutral housing, which allows
students to room with each other
regardless of their gender. Nine
schools have changed their policies
within the last year to include gen-
der-neutral housing, and another 12
colleges have said they plan to in the
near future.

In the past, the specialized
housing plans were mainly geared
toward students who identified as
transgender.
Joan Giblin, director of residen-
tial life and housing at Clark Uni-
versity in Massachusetts, said the
change, made last fall, was well
received by students. Giblin, who
credited students with pressuring
the school onthe policy change, said
it was a freshman who spearheaded
the effort to alter the original policy
in the first place. The change took
less than two years to implement,
See HOUSING, Page SA

SAM WOLSON/bail
Fifth-year senior Lindsey Bruck, a two-time All American gymnast, teaches physi
cal educatiun at Ann Arhur's Pioneer High Schuol.

weight room, and the remaining
days are spent in the classroom,
regular gym or the gymnastics
room at the school.
From 7:40 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.,
Bruck organizes cooperative
games and teaches personal fitness
at the high school. Then she drives
to gymnastics practice for the Wol-
verines, which usually lasts until
5:30 p.m. After that, she prepares
for the next day's classes.
"I'm usually in bed by 9:30,"

Bruck said with a laugh.
At5-foot-3,Bruckis shorter than
many of the students she teaches.
She has been stopped and asked
to show a hall pass, like a regular
high schooler. She had to convince
the teacher that she was a student-
teacher - and 23 years old.
But the second she walks into
the gym, Bruck -immediately
assumes control her class. The stu-
dents address her politely as Miss
See BRUCK, Page 3A

WEATHER HI:f69
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