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March 24, 2008 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-03-24

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A faithful retelling of 'Horton' Don't label our generation
Finally, a kid's book done right on the big screen Arts, Page SA Why a name won't stick Opinion Page 4A
()INE-HIU)NDRED-I1HlTEEN YlE-ARS ( 1' D17RIAI ,R EED)M

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, March 24,2008

MICHIGAN 2, MIAMI (OHIO)1

michigandaily.com
CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS
One day left
for GE ,'U'
to forge deal

If no agreement is
reached today, GSIs
will start walkout
By JACOB SMILOVITZ
Daily StaffReporter
From 11:30 a.m. until midnight
today, bargaining teams from
the University and the Gradu-
ate Employees' Organization will
make one final effort to reach
an agreement on a new contract
for graduate student instructors
before their contract exprires and
a planned two-day walkout starts
tomorrow.
Negotiations between the Uni-
versity and GEO, the union that

represents about 1,700 Univer-
sity GSIs, have been rocky since
November.
The most contentious issuesstill
on the table are salary increases
and improved health care cover-
age for GSIs in the three-year con-
tract.
History GSI Colleen Woods,
the lead negotiator for GEO, said
the only way to avoid a walkout
would be for both sides to agree on
the GEO's core contract demands,
which include a first-year
salary increase, expanded health
care coverage, wage parity for
low-fraction GSIs and a more flex-
ible child care subsidy.
"There needs to be signifi-
cant movement to our positions,"
See GEO, Page 3A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS
MAP dominates
campus elections

Michigan junior goalie Billy Sauer holds the Mason Cup over his head following Michigan's 2-1 win over Miami (Ohio) in the CCHA Conference Tournament Champion-
ship game. The Wolverines will continue their postseason push when they travel to Albany, N.Y. for a first-round game against Niagara on Friday.
SSTRAIGHT TO, TH1E TOP

Par
rep
In a
Michit
LSA S
tion re
Party
in last
electio
tial an
both o
LSA
and Ru

ty wins executive Arvind Sohoni, the MAP presi-
dential and vice presidential can-
)sts, majority of didates for the assembly, secured
their victory by winning 1,730
resentative seats votes, or about 71 percent of all
votes, in the election.
By ANDY KROLL LSA junior Leslie Zaikis and
Daily News Editor LSA sophomore John Monaghan,
the MAP presidential and vice
near repeat of last year's presidential candidates for LSA-
gan Student Assembly and SG, ran unopposed.
Student Government elec- All 13 of MAP's MSA represen-
sults, the Michigan Action tative candidates - nine in LSA,
swept aside the competition two in the College of Engineer-
week's MSA and LSA-SG ing, one in the School of Art and
ns, winning the presiden- Design and one in the Division of
d vice presidential spots in Kinesiology - won in their bids
rganizations. for a seat on the assembly. The
junior Sabrina Shingwani party also won all nine available
ms School of Business junior See ELECTIONS, Page 3A

Sauer carries
Wolverines to
CCHA title
By MICHAEL EISENSTEIN
Daily Sports Writer
DETROIT - At the end of last
season, "Billy Sauer" chants were
nearly unimaginable.
Despite a stellar performance
between the pipes for the major-
ity of the CCHA championship
game last year, Sauer committed
a critical mistake, the kind that
prevents a team from achieving
its highest goals.
Sauer made an easy save but

couldn't clear the puck, allowing
Jason Paige to stick it between the
goalie's legs to seal Notre Dame's
2-1 win and conference champi-
onship.
His inconsistent play plagued
the team all year.
But this weekend - and sea-
son - was a completely different
story.
Once the horn sounded to seal
the Michigan hockey team's 2-1
victory and CCHA playoff cham-
pionship over Miami (Ohio), the
Wolverines bull rushed the junior
as congratulations for his near-
shutout, 27-save performance.
"I just tried to tackle Bill as
hard as I (could)," defenseman
Chris Summers said. "He gave us

a chance to win and that's all you
can do. He played out of his mind
today."
During the on-ice celebration,
Michigan coach Red Berenson's
first words over the loudspeaker
singled out the netminder's play
in front of the Joe Louis Arena
crowd.
And as the Mason Cup trophy
presentation began, the Wolver-
ine faithful chanted his name
from the arena's upper bowl.
It was Sauer's weekend perfor-
mance that anchored Michigan
(31-5-4 overall), a team picked to
finish fourth in the CCHA during
the preseason, in its playoff cham-
pionship run.
With Michigan on the pen-

For more on Michigan's CCHA
Tournament win and the Wolver-
ines' hopes in the NCAA Tourna-
ment, see SportsMonday
alty kill late in the second period,
Sauer came up with not one, but
two eye-popping saves against
Miami (32-7-1).
Sauer saved RedHawk forward
Pat Cannone's point-blank shot
from the right crease before the
rebound was fired back at the
goalie. The puck flew between
Sauer's legs and hit the post before
the junior sprawled onto the ice
to trap the rubber disc under his
maize sweater.
See HOCKEY, Page 7A

TIE MICHIGAN INDIFFERENCE
The rise and fall of participation in Michigan Student Assembly presidential elections
10,000 -

8,000 -

Lon
LLJ
0

6,000
4,000

1

CAMPUS LIFE
Policy aims to restrict
alcohol at frat parties
Largest council require guests to bring their own
alcohol.
wants partygoers to IFC officials hope the policy
will decrease irresponsible drink-
check their alcohol ing, said LSA junior Ryan Spotts,
vice president of public relations
at the door for the IFC and a member of Pi
Kappa Phi.
By JILLIAN BERMAN He said this year's executive
Daily StaffReporter board hopes to enforce the policy
more effectively than past groups
Partygoers looking to drink at have. He said previous executive
certain fraternities may have to board members tried to imple-
bring their own booze in the near ment the policy too late in their
future. terms. In Feb. 2005, when the
The Interfraternity Council, IFC last tried to enforce the plan,
the largest Greek councils on executive board members had
campus, wants to enforce a policy about one month left in their
in its bylaws forbidding fraterni- terms.
ties from providing alcohol at its Ross School of Business junior
parties. The move would instead See ALCOHOL, Page 3A

BUSTING A MOVE

2,000
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
YEAR SOURCE:DAILY,MSA RULESANDELECTIONSCOMMITTEE
UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
'U' helping to develop
bat-like spy plane

$10M grant lets 'U'
play role in six-inch
plane's creation
By ELAINE LAFAY
Daily StaffReporter
The United States Army has
given the University a $10 million
grant to help develop a tiny robot-
ic spy plane that would be used to
collect intelligence for soldiers in
combat zones.
University researchers have
nicknamed the plane "The Bat"
for both its size and the technol-
ogy it will use.
Measuring just six inches in

length, the tiny winged robot will
sense possible dangers like bombs
by detecting objects, chemicals
and vibrations in the air using
technology modeled after live
bats.
The Bat's "head" will contain
cameras, microphone and radar
technology to steer the robot and
to instantaneously send informa-
tion back to soldiers.
The entire robot is only expect-
ed to weigh about four ounces.
Kamal Sarabandi, an electrical
engineering and computer sci-
ence professor who will oversee
the research, said the Bat will help
soldiers gather information about
places that may be unsafe to enter.
See BAT PLANE, Page 3A

JEREMY CHO/Daily
BBoy Born, a professional dancer from Korea, performs an exhibition breakdance
Saturday in front of a crowd at Master the Art 2008, the University's breakdanc-
ing event. The competition was held in Michigan Union Ballroom.

WEATHER HI: 40
TOMORROW LO:31

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ON THE DAILY ell03S
Former sweatshop workers speak at the 'U'
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THEWIRE

INDEX NEWS................2A CROSSWORD...............6A
Vol. CXVIII,No.119 OPINION ...........................4A CLASSIFIEDS ...................6A
cQ 008TheMichiganDaily ARTS.................................5A SPORTSMONDAY.................1B
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