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March 14, 2008 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-03-14

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Men's hoops knocks off Iowa in Big
Ten tourney first round Sports, Page 8.

A simple guide to starting your
own MSA political party opinion, Page 4

NEiD iIan 3at
ONE -HU NDRED -EIGHTEEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Ann Arbor, Michigan_

Friday, March 14,2008

michigandaily.com

SPRING COMMENCEMENT
Contentious
graduation
move at NYU
mirrors U
After move from Manhattan to
Bronx, NYU officials sought way
to make Yankee Stadium feel
more like Greenwich Village
By BETH WITTENSTEIN
Daily StaffReporter
Although many students graduating in April might
feel out of place celebrating commencement on the
Diag instead ofin the Big House, they can take solace in
knowing they aren't the only graduates in the country
tossing their caps in an unexpected place.
For the past 32 years, New York University has held
its university-wide commencement ceremony in pic-
turesque Washington Square Park, which lies at the
heart of NYU's otherwise urban campus.
But the New York City Department of Parks and
Recreation began a renovation project this winter in
the park, forcing NYU administrators to look else-
where for a suitable commencement setting.
While University of Michigan administrators
offered graduates Elbel Field or the Diag as alterna-
tive commencement venues, NYU whittled down its
options to a pair of slightly more well-known locations:
Shea Stadium, home of the New York Mets, or Yankee
Stadium.
After looking at the two teams's game schedules,
NYU administrators selected Yankee Stadium, in The
Bronx, as the location of this spring's ceremony.
But for some students, like NYU junior Nick Gupta,
the news that commencement would not be held in
the park - which, with its iconic arch, is at the core of
NYU's Greenwich Village campus in downtown Man-
hattan - was met with mixed feelings.
Gupta said the park is what ties NYU's campus
together because much of the restofNYU's urban cam-
pus consists of buildings that easily blend in with the
rest of Greenwich Village.
"The archis our place," he said. "It's the one normal,
See COMMENCEMENT, Page 7

BENJI DE LL/DO
Nathaniel Eli Coats Styer (LEFT), the new chair of the College Democrats, and Brady Smith, the new chair of the College Republicans, both look to mobilize students within their groups.
VOTEDS OF CONFIDENC
College Dems chair sets his ' Uniting Republicans is aim

sights on fall election win

of new campus GOP leader

By JULIE ROWE
Daily StaffReporter
The new chair of the College Demo-
crats signs his e-mails to the group
"Democratically Yours" - and he
means it.
LSA sophomore Nathaniel Eli Coats
Styer was appointed chair of the Uni-
versity's chapter of College Democrats
lastweek. Styer,who described himself
as "devoted to the Democratic Party,"
said he plans to work to mobilize the
1,500-member group to get a Democrat
elected in the 2008 presidential elec-
tion this fall.

"It's a huge time commitment,"
Styer said. "ButI think there's a greater
cause. And if I have to lose some sleep,
so be it."
The election, Styer said, is a crucial
one for the Democrats, and the Univer-
sity's chapter of College Democrats has
a chance to make a big impact.
"A Democrat cannot winthe election
without Michigan, and Michigan's not
going to go Democrat without turning
out Ann Arbor and the University of
Michigan," Styer said.
Styer said he plans to develop an
election strategy with other mem-
See DEMOCRATS, Page 3

By JULIE ROWE
Daily StaffReporter
Though he said it can be tough to
be a Republican at the University of
Michigan, LSA sophomore Brady
Smith, the new chair of the Universi-
ty's chapter of College Republicans at
the University, likes the challenge.
Just because Democrats outnum-
ber Republicans on campus doesn't
mean they can't get along and have
a "thoughtful, comprehensive
exchange of ideas," Smith said.
"I have my ideas challenged here
on a daily basis," Smith said. "I

believe that the best way to respect
ideas is to challenge them."
Smith was elected to chair the
University's chapter of the College
Republicans earlier this month. His
main goal as chair, he said, is to unite
the "bashful" and "scattered voices"
of Republicans on campus.
Smith called the University a "bas-
tion of liberalism" in need of conser-
vative voices.
He said the College Republicans
could fill that void.
"One thing I'm really looking for-
ward to doing is creating a vibrant,
See REPUBLICANS, Page 3

NEAR-CAMPUS CRIME
Armed robbers hold up Papa John's

DANCE MARATHON
Helped by Dance Marathon,
14-year-old starts his own

Suspects fled after
late-night robbery
By ALEX KAZICKAS
Daily StaffReporter
An armed robbery took place
early yesterday morning at a Papa
John's Pizza near campus, prompt-
ing the Department of Public Safety
to issue a crime alert.
Two male suspects entered the
restaurant, located on the corner of
East Huron and Division streets, at
about 1:15 a.m. and took an undis-

closed amount of money, Ann Arbor
Police Department Sgt. Richard
Kinsey said.
One of the suspects pointed a.
handgun at the clerk, Kinsey said.
The two men fled Papa John's,
which was not crowded at the time
of the robbery, on foot.
The crime alert described the
suspects as black males wearing all
black clothing and black ski masks.
One of the men was described as
being 6 feet tall with a thin-to-
medium build, while the other was
described as 5-feet-6 inches with a
medium build.

Kinsey said he wasn't sure if the
armed robbery was related to any
other campus crime. On Feb. 22,
duringtheUniversity'sspringbreak,
two men robbed the Jamaican Jerk
Pit on Thayer Street. Those robbers
had different police description.
"We're looking into it to see if
there are any related cases in the
city and around the county," Kin-
sey said.
Kinsey said crimes of this nature
are usually solved.
"When you get a robbery crew
like that, they will keep hittinguntil
they get caught," he said.

GOING 'ALL IN' FOR DIVERSITY

Northrup's event at
his middle school
raised $7,000
By LISA HAIDOSTIAN
Daily NewsEditor
Colin Northrup couldn't stop
smiling.
"With what U of M did, I have
been able to fly in an airplane and
climb a tree," he said.
Colin, an eighth-grader at Mill
Creek Middle School in nearby
Dexter, is confined to a wheelchair
because of cerebral palsy. Sitting in
his room adorned with University
of Michigan memorabilia, wheel-
chair hockey league trophies and a
massive electronic train set, Colin
gushed about how, for the past
eight years, he's benefited from
the University's Dance Marathon,
a campus-wide event that donates
money for pediatric rehabilitation.
Dance marathon "dancers"
pledge to raise at least $300 in
exchange for standing in the track
and field building for 30 consecu-
tive hours. Last year, the event
raised more than $350,000 and for
this year's marathon - to be held
tomorrow and Sunday - organiz-
ers are hoping to raise even more.
Through Dance Marathon's
funding, Colin is able to attend
summer camp, play adapted soccer
and do "recreational therapy" -
non-traditional activities like mar-

Colin Northrup, 14, was inspired by the University's Dance Marathon to start his
own fundraiser at his mdidleschool, Northrup, a Dexter resident, suffers from
cerebral palsy and received physical therapy funded by the campus fundraiser.

tial arts that help exercise muscles
and improve coordination.
But Colin has been busy with
more than just fun and games.
Students became excited two
years ago when LSA senior Steve
Crompton, the external director of
the University's Dance Marathon,
gave a presentation to the school's
Community Service and Learning
class. Val Berryman, who teaches
the class, said the students in one of
the class's committees were eager

to launch the school's first mara-
thon.
Crompton couldn't be happier,
saying that Colin has gone through
"the full cycle." At first, he was a
recipient of the therapy funded by
Dance Marathon. Now he's helping
to provide it for others.
"We've empowered him to take
on the responsibility of continuing
the mission of the Dance Mara-
thon," he said. "His life has been so
See DANCE MARATHON, Page 3

SAM WULSO/nai
LSA sophomores John Ciccone (RIGHT) and Brian Mikolajczyk (LEFT) wait for LSA senior Ramzi Takla to deal them their cards
in a game of blackjack at South Quad's multicultural-themed casino night, which featured traditional and multicultural games.

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