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March 10, 2008 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-03-10

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,News

I

2A - Monday, March10, 2008

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Greeks give press the silent treatment

ROTC SCRUBS

The Interfraternity Council presi-
dent at Penn State University, Abe
Gitterman, recently issued a policy
prohibiting all fraternity members
from speaking to members of the
press, the Daily Collegian reported.
In an e-mail sent to fraternity
members, Gitterman said the policy
is meant to protect "the credibility
and images" of the fraternity system.
The policy asks for the IFC execu-
tive board to be consulted before any
interaction with the media.
Critics of the policy are concerned
about the limitation it might impose
on the freedom of speech. "Just
because you are the president of a
fraternal organization doesn't give
you the power to control what people
can and can't talk about," said Melis-
sa Melewsky, a media law attorney
from the Pennsylvania Newspaper
Association.
STUDENT PRESIDENT KILLED
University of North Carolina's
student body president, Eve Marie

Carson, was shot and killed l
in what appeared to be a ran
of violence, The Associate
reported.
Her body was found in ti
early Wednesday morning,
keys and wallet are missi
car was found a mile away
had stayed home that nigi
her roommates went out, sa
Chief Brian Curran.
There was no sign of fort
into her home, he said. Ther
suspects.
ICEBREAKER BANN
TheUniversityofNebrask
ly prohibited the playing ofA
a popular game often used a
breaker on college campuE
Associated Press reported.
Juan Franco, the Univers
chancellor of student affair
a campus-wide e-mail that t
"is extremely inappropriate
day and age in which we ar
familiar with the Virginia'I

ast week Northern Illinois University shoot- 7
sdom act ings."
-d Press Fans of the game think the Uni-
versity is overreacting.
he street "The game is just a big-kid version
and her of hide and seek. It makes you think,
tng. Her and it's strategic," said Lance Parke,
. Carson an Appalachian State student.
ht while
id Police PRAYING FOR FUNDING
A $10 million state appropria-
ed entry tion given to a Baptist university in
re are no Kentucky was found to be unconsti-
tutional after the school suspended
a student for coming out as gay on
ED MySpace.com, the Chronicle of
arecent- Higher Education reported.
Assassin, Judge Roger Crittenden ruled that
s an ice- the appropriation was "a direct pay-
ses, The ment to a nonpublic religious school
for educational purposes," and is
ity's vice therefore unconstitutional.
s, said in The University of Cumberlands
he game had intended to use the money to CHANEL VON HABSBURG-LOTHRINGEN/0
in this fund its new pharmacy school. It has Potential candidates for an honorary aviation serv
in tis unditsnewpharacyschol.It as sciety within ROTC clean the M on she Diag. All
e all too 30 days to file an appeal candidates ore required to clean the M and take
rech and EMILYBARTON standardized entrance exam to join the society.
CAMPUS EVENTS& NOTES THREE THINGS YOU
Conference on 'Future of Islam' SHLD T AV

Daily
vice
!n

(14C IIC41-aan 1ailm
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NEWS EDITORS: EmilyBarton,KellyFraser,Lisa Haidostian, AndyKroll
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FINANCE ASSISTANT MANAGER: Daniel Cheung
The Michigan Daily stI SN745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by studentsat theUniversity of Michigan.One copy is avalablefree of chargetoallreaders.
Additionalcopiesmaybe picked upatthe Daily's officefor $2.Subscriptionsforfalltermstartingin
September,vias..reawlar Winterterm(anuary through Apri)is$11,yearlong tSeptember
throughApilis195.niversit ilits resuecattoadusbsiptin rateO pus
uebscptinsfoallsmand35.Absciptionsegatbeppaid.Oheoiohfannailyisaebersf
The Asatd resd Thsitd Colae ~ress.

A

CRIME NOTES
lot NW-43, DPS reported. The
Door to dorm car was valued at $5,000. Police
music practice are investigating the case.
ThuSICa"NIUTDe

room damaged
WHERE: Alice Lloyd Hall
WHEN: Friday at about 2:30
p.m.
WHAT: The door to music
practice room B170 in the Base-
ment of Alice Lloyd Hall was
damaged, the Department of
Public Safety reported. The
damage was valued at $500.
Police have one suspect and are
investigating the case.
Car stolen from
Northwood
parking lot
WHERE: Northwood IV
Community Apartments, Lot
NW-43
WHEN: Thursday at about
noon
WHAT: A person reported a
car was stolen out of parking

Iriee A s r
issued late at
night in Arb
WHERE: Nichols Arboretum
WHEN: Friday at about 1:50
a.m.
WHAT: Three people were
cited with minors in possession
of alcohol at Nichols Arbore-
tum, DPS reported. They were
released by police at the scene.
Unknown man
bothers students
WHERE: West Quad
WHEN: Saturday at about 3
a.m.
WHAT: An unknown man
was in West Quad harassing
students, DPS reported. The
man was escorted out of the
building. Police warned him
for trespassing.

humor
WHAT: A conference titled
"The Serious Stuff about
Humor: What is It? Why is
It?" that looks at the science
behind humor and comedy.
Two writers from "The Daily
Show with Jon Stewart" will
also speak at the conference.
WHEN: Today from Ito 5 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Theater
Talk on race and
gender in the
presidential race
WHAT: A lecture about the
historical and current contexts
for understanding the role of
gender and race in the presi-
dential election
WHO: Institute for Research
on Women and Gender
WHEN: Today at 3 p.m.
WHERE: Lane Hall, Room
2239

discussion
WHAT: A panel discussion
with Islamic scholar Nasr
Hamid Abu Zayd and Uni-
versity faculty on how the
interpretation of the Qur'an is
affected by those who inter-
pret the work for the public
WHO: Center for Middle
Eastern and North African
Studies
WHEN: Today at 5:30 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League,
Hussey Room
CORRECTIONS
0 A story in the Feb. 11 issue
of the Daily (Cash shortfall
slows down Washtenaw wire-
less program) said the city of
Ypsilanti created a free
wireless network with a pri-
vate donation. The network
was created by Steve Pierce
and Brian Robb.
0 Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

Students can now begin
signing up for the Depart-
ment of Public Safety's UM
Emergency Alert System text
messaging program by enter-
ing their mobile phone num-
ber into Wolverine Access. The
system will send messages to
students and faculty in the
case of a tornado, shooter or
chemical spill on campus.
The No. 4 Michigan wom-
en's gymnastics team
beat No. 1 and three-time
defending national champion
Georgia on Friday. The Wol-
verines are now 15-0 on the
season.
>>FOR MORE, SEE SPORTSMONDAY
Serbian prime minister
Vojislav Kostunica dis-
solved the government
Saturday and called for new
elections, Time reported. Kos-
tunica wants the new elec-
tions held on May 11, and said
the government will function
ip a reduced capacity until
that date.

I I

Experts: Iraq war Will cost $12 billion a month in 2008 Israelto build homes in West Bank

JL JL I

(AP) - The flow of blood may be
ebbing, but the flood of money into
the Iraq war is steadily rising, new
analyses show.
In 2008, its sixth year, the war
will cost approximately $12 billion
a month, triple the "burn" rate of its
earliest years, Nobel Prize-winning
economist Joseph E. Stiglitz and
co-author Linda J. Bilmes report in
a new book.
Beyond 2008, working with
"best-case" and "realistic-moder-
ate" scenarios, they project the
Iraq and Afghan wars, including
long-term U.S. military occupa-
tions of those countries, will cost
the U.S. budget between $1.7 tril-
lion and $2.7 trillion - or more
- by 2017.
Interest on money borrowed
to pay those costs could alone add
$816 billion to that bottom line,

they say.
The nonpartisan Congressio-
nal Budget Office (CBO) has done
its own projections and comes in
lower, forecasting a cumulative
cost by 2017 of $1.2 trillion to $1.7
trillion for the two wars, with Iraq
generally accounting for three-
quarters of the costs.
Variations in such estimates
stem from the sliding scales of
assumptions, scenarios and budget
items that are counted. But what-
ever the estimate, the cost will be
huge, the auditors of the Govern-
ment Accountability Office say.
In a Jan. 30 report to Congress,
the GAO observed that the U.S. will
be committing "significant" future
resources to the wars, "requiring
decision makers to consider diffi-
cult trade-offs as the nation faces
an increasing long-range fiscal

challenge."
These numbers don't include the
war's costto the rest of the world. In
Iraq itself, the 2003 U.S.-led inva-
sion - with its devastating air bom-
bardments - and the looting and
arson that followed, severely dam-
aged electricity and other utilities,
the oil industry, countless factories,
hospitals, schools and other under-
pinnings of an economy.
No one has tried to calculate
the economic damage done to
Iraq, said spokesman Niels Buen-
emann of the International Mon-
etary Fund, which closely tracks
national economies. But millions
of Iraqis have been left without
jobs, and hundreds of thousands of
professionals, managers and other
middle-class citizens have fled the
country.
In their book,"The Three Trillion

Dollar War," Stiglitz, of Columbia
University, and Bilmes, of Harvard,
report the two wars will have cost
the U.S. budget $845 billion in 2007
dollars by next Sept. 30, end of fis-
cal year 2008, assuming Congress
fully funds Bush administration
requests. That counts not just mili-
tary operations, but embassy costs,
reconstruction and other war-
related expenses.
That total far surpasses the $670
billion in 2007 dollars the Congres-
sional Research Service says was
the U.S. price tag for the 12-year
Vietnam War.
Although American military
and Iraqi civilian casualties have
declined in recent months, the rate
of spending has shot up. A fully
funded 2008 war budget will be
155 percent higher than 2004's, the
CBO reports.

JERUSALEM (AP) - Israel
announced plans to build hun-
dreds of homes in the West Bank
and disputed east Jerusalem,
drawing Palestinian condemna-
tion just days before a visit by a
U.S. general to monitor the trou-
bled peace process.
Housing Minister Zeev Boim
said the new housing would
include 350 apartments in Givat
Zeev, a West Bank settlement
just outside of Jerusalem, and 750
homes in the Pisgat Zeev neigh-
borhood of east Jerusalem.
Speaking to Israel Radio, Boim
said the Givat Zeev construction
initially began some eight years
ago, but was suspendedbecause of
fighting with the Palestinians.
"When violence subsided,
demand grew again and contrac-
tors renewed their permits to
build there," he said. The Pisgat

Zeev construction, he added, "is
inside Jerusalem's city borders."
Israel captured the West Bank
and east Jerusalem in the 1967
Mideast war. It immediately
annexed east Jerusalem and con-
siders all of the city its capital.
The annexation has not been rec-
ognized internationally.
The Palestinians claim all of
the West Bank and east Jerusalem
as parts of a future independent
state. But Israel has said it wants
to keep large settlement blocs,
along with Jewish neighborhoods
of east Jerusalem, under any final
peace agreement.
The construction "is consistent
with our long-standing position
that building within the large set-
tlementblocs,whichwillstayapart
of Israel in any final status agree-
ment, will continue," said govern-
ment spokesman Mark Regev said.

9

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